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Nautidawg
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Discussion Starter #3
Awaiting response from beneteau. Figured it might cost a fortune and my searches online didnt' find too much info.
 

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Even Home Depot sells Teak which you can cut to size yourself however if your up in Anchorage, Juneau, etc Alaska you would likely have to mail order it from one of dozens of suppliers. Having Beneteau mill and pre-cut exact replacements for you would likely be much more costly. If you don't feel up to ripping the strips down yourself you still may find a local carpenter, contractor or lumber yard that will do it for at a more reasonable cost however Beneteau might surprise us all with reasonable rates.
 

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Unless your boat is a fairly recent model (perhaps the most recent) I don’t think Beneteau will supply a replacement. They no longer make a replacement for mine (Jeanneau owned by Beneteau) and my model was discontinued only 10 years ago.

I think all Beneteau group boats have decks that are make of teak systems, not individual boards. IOW, the strips are pre-attached, in a tongue and groove style, to make larger sheets of deck and cut to size. Edge and trim pieces are then made to fit. They are also fairly thin.

One option (all are pricey) is Teak Deck Systems, who will make a deck for you from a template. They can be ordered in varying thicknesses and are real individual planks, not the same as the OEM cheaper stuff. If you look up the Boatworks YouTube channel, he has a couple of episodes on making the template and installing the new deck.

I suspect, if it is similar to mine, the cockpit sections are laid into recessed cavities, so thickness may be limited.

My decks are 14 years old now and I can see a replacement on the horizon. Not fun, but an upgrade would last substantially longer than the OEM product, if cared for properly.
 
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s/v Passport, Bianca 111
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Don't just buy any teak from a home center. You need vertical grain (quarter sawn) or you are wasting your money.

I just did this over the winter. I'm pretty experienced with woodworking so did a lot of my milling but you can have the milling done. I can't imaging going through the boat mfg. but then again it wasn't an option for me.

I intended to buy pre-made panels from Teak decking systems but prices have gone up about 30% in the last 18 months. It was $4K for the cockpit and my cockpit ain't that big.

So I decided to make the panels myself. I shopped around quite a bit and got some good recommendation from people in the industry on where to buy raw material. I went with East Teak Teak Lumber - Teak Wood - East Teak Fine Hardwoods. They were great, the wood was very nice and they will mill it for you if you like. Buy the glue/mastic to glue it down and the seaming compound from Teak Decking Systems. All in all I probably have $900 in it. I probably only added 30% of the labor building the panels myself as that is pretty easy.
 

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S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
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I just did this over the winter. I'm pretty experienced with woodworking so did a lot of my milling but you can have the milling done. I can't imaging going through the boat mfg. but then again it wasn't an option for me.
Any photos to share?
 

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Most home centers if you go to the Special Orders or Contractors Desk can order quarter sawn Teak or other specialty woods. You just have to ask and many may surprise you with economical prices that beat the internet venues.

I was head of maintenance in a millworks that was part of a home center store and we could get just about any species of wood that was not banned from import into the USA (sometimes even find the banned ones that were imported before the ban went into effect or were reclaimed) and would many times buy it in rough form to saw and mill to the exact specification and profile required. A good millworks will also have the ability to dip and infuse under pressure different types of wood preservatives to increase longevity.
 

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s/v Passport, Bianca 111
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I have no doubt you are right and I'm not trying to be contrary but for me, I would go to one of only a couple teak suppliers.

I learned a bit about the global teak industry during this project and if you want to in fact use teak, you may as well use the best stuff because your really not going to save much with lesser quality wood. The right wood will last 30+ years of seasonal boating (assumption based on the POs location) so a job that only needs doing once. This also assumes of course that you know what your doing with maintaining the teak i.e. no scrubbing with the grain, chemicals, etc.

Plantation teak is just not as good but may very well be good enough. It really depends on you and your expectations.

Pics forthcoming
 

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Nautidawg
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all.
@Minnewaska, yes indeed these are strips that are milled to certain lengths and shape (rounded on tops for lack of better word)-and they are recessed. Owner(s) never maintained for what I can tell-there are broken strips, cracked strips, missing strips....

Called a mill yard and they can do but actually sort of suggested against teak (due to it being $35/bd ft). Def a challenge to replace this stuff as like you said theyr'e recessed--too bad Beneteau did it like this back in the day ;)

If it were flat and not recessed we could just remove and polish up the fiberglass and leave it there...
 

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s/v Passport, Bianca 111
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Just make a template of the recess with paper. In some ways its easier.

Get milled teak battens. Cut them to rough but oversize length. Secure them and caulk the seams. Put the paper template on top, trace, and cut off the excess. Glue it down and then caulk the perimeter.

You can get it cheaper than that.
 

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Another option is to replace with one of the new cork products. Easier to repair and nearly maintenance free. I have to assume preparation of the base is critical for a smooth look.

Ironically, I have an odd issue with it. They make the cork to look like a caulked teak deck from a distance. It's like tofurkey to me. If you want to eat tofu (especially if doing so for vegetarian reasons), why make it look and taste like turkey? You should want it for what it is. Dying fake caulk lines on teak seems weird.
 
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@icarus05 I was looking at your pictures thinking, damn that boat is inside! Nice spot. Teak work looks nice, winter 18 for me. I broke the boat budget winter 2017. There is a guy here in NJ that sells reclaimed teak logs. There is another in White Plains NY and third in Baltimore area that supply FEQ to Marine market.
 

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Annapolis Source for teak for cockpit replacement

In the mid-Atlantic I heartily recommend Exotic Lumber in Annapolis (Rt 50 west end of the Bay Bridge). They run an amazing shop. EVERY kind of hardwood. Lots of teak lumber (up to 10ft). and teak veneer marine plywood (1/8” is hard to find). They mill and plane and make basic cuts. No routing.
 

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Re: Annapolis Source for teak for cockpit replacement

In the mid-Atlantic I heartily recommend Exotic Lumber in Annapolis (Rt 50 west end of the Bay Bridge). They run an amazing shop. EVERY kind of hardwood. Lots of teak lumber (up to 10ft). and teak veneer marine plywood (1/8” is hard to find). They mill and plane and make basic cuts. No routing.
I second Exotic Lumber. It’s a wine store of different wood. Right down the street from our marina. Look in their scrap bin for extraordinary deals.
 

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Yes as addicting as a wine store. I could wander their warehouse for hours and not get bored. Roberto is the manager and he is GREAT👌
 
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