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Discussion Starter #1
I'd LOVE to have a ceiling of teak strips, but the lumber would cost more than the boat. In my area, there are no lumber places other then HD and Lowes, who carry only oak and poplar.

Can anyone suggest an affordable but sufficiently durable species of wood, and where the heck to find it?

If I am unsuccessful in my quest, I will simply use foam headliner, but I sure would prefer wood. Many thanks. :)
 

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I'd LOVE to have a ceiling of teak strips, but the lumber would cost more than the boat. In my area, there are no lumber places other then HD and Lowes, who carry only oak and poplar.

Can anyone suggest an affordable but sufficiently durable species of wood, and where the heck to find it?

If I am unsuccessful in my quest, I will simply use foam headliner, but I sure would prefer wood. Many thanks. :)
If you have some time, I'd suggest that you sign up for Woodcraft's e-mail alerts. I found a great deal on some Honduran Mahogany. Honduran mahogany is often used in marine environments and while it's not as rot resistant as teak, it's much better than many other alternatives. It also will blend nicely with teak. You'll probably need access to a thickness planer and a table saw, but if you were considering teak anyway, I'm assuming that you may already have the tools.

-- Bill
Belle Voile
PSC 34
 

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Sapele is cheap, available, and absolutely beautiful. Not bad to work with and has a pleasant but light scent.
Sorta like cedar with a tiny hint of oak. A soft scent. Ahhhhh...

It compares quite closely with Honduras Mahogany in rot and insect resistance, but is slightly stronger (and very slightly heavier), and much harder.

I've found it to be relatively forgiving of bending to easy large radii (such as a hull liner) when its hardness is considered (harder than maple actually), but suggest you stick to nice, long, straight grained planks if that is your use.

Afromosia is nice stuff, too. Half the price of Teak, but twice the cost of Sapele.

Iroko would be an excellent compromise as well. Its price falls between that of Afromosia and Sapele.
 

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+1 for Sapele, have used it for a galley rebuild on our boat and exterior doors (not on boats) for years.

Try Hardwood Lumber & Millwork in Lakeland, haven't used them but their reviews are excellent. I expect they can plane and rip what you need, if you're not equipped to do so.
 

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While at HD look at closet liners. They used to have some cedar paneling that I always thought would make good ceiling. It comes in bundles of 20 square feet or so for on the order of $20.00. The cedar also has a slight but pleasant aroma. I bought some for the boat, but my wife insisted I experiment with a closet first. Cedar has a long history aboard ship.
Always remember that teak became the"preferred" wood for marine use because it was the cheapest available material.
Lou
 

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Is it a ceiling OR a head liner you want? For head liner yellow cedar ,cheap ,durable easy to work. Light colour can be good unless you want the dark man cave look.
 

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Is it a ceiling OR a head liner you want? For head liner yellow cedar ,cheap ,durable easy to work. Light colour can be good unless you want the dark man cave look.
Good point. Slats of teak are frequently used as ceiling (i.e. on the inboard sides of the hull). However, I don't think I've ever seen it used on the overhead. I'm not sure to which the OP is referring.

-- Bill
Belle Voile
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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, I'm referring to the ceiling, as in the inside of the hull - not the overhead.

I'm in a time crunch, will be back this evening. Great replies, thanks all!!
 

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I assumed he was talking about ceiling, since that was the word he used, and my response was regarding ceiling not headliner. That being said I've seen bead board used as headliner, and it doesn't look bad. I considered it, but could only find 1/4 inch which was too difficult to would with.
 

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Everyplace sells Ipe, one of several woods called "ironwood", for decking. That puts some limits on the size (i.e. 1x5?) but you can always have that ripped to the size you want. If you need longer strips, you're off to find a real lumber yard. Best done locally, since shipping lumber is rather pricey.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Here's something I had not thought of: Chuck Rose, of "Cruising LeaLea" fame, brought up the possibility of using plywood strips rather than solid lumber. Said he had seen it done, with excellent results.

This appeals to me a lot. It would save me a fortune, and be easy to do. I'd use marine-grade, Sapele-veneer plywood, thoroughly sealed with penetrating epoxy, and varnished.

If the idea is sound, what thickness do you guys think would be best? Would 6mm be enough? That's just a hair under 1/4". Better off with 9mm maybe?

Speaking of sapele veneer, I've always thought that's what the manufacturer used on my boat. Am I right?


 

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You're close enough to Ft. Lauderdale to try Constantines Wood Center - Woodworking Supplies and Tools - Fort Lauderdale, FL they are a woodworking shop that stock veneers and lumber for cabinetry and other fine woodworking trades. I know them from their previous location in the Bronx, NY.

Among other great resources, they sell a "veneer sampler" kit with something like 50 slices of labeled veneers in it. It is a dangerous kit, it exposes you to the lust for many fine and exotic wood that can be had.(G)

If they don't have what you need, they'll certainly be able to tell you if there's any local source for it. Craftsmen, not clerks.
 
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