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Anyone out there know anything about soverel 37? Are they shoal draft centerboard .How is their sailing ability?
racadaca
 

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I have a Soverel 38 sloop built in 1969, I have owned the boat for 46 years. It is the Centerboad version, 4.6 ft with the board up and a little short of 10 ft with the board down. The centerboard is 1500 pounds of solid bronze. With the board down the boat become very stable and stiff.
 

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First boat I ever sailed in was a brand new Soverel 37. Long time ago but I do recall we made a pretty fast passage to the central Bahamas. Since it was new, no problems but I have heard they were pretty well made.

And yes it was a centerboard but don't recall if it was weighted like the 38 hduncan reports.
 

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First boat I ever sailed in was a brand new Soverel 37. Long time ago but I do recall we made a pretty fast passage to the central Bahamas. Since it was new, no problems but I have heard they were pretty well made.

And yes it was a centerboard but don't recall if it was weighted like the 38 hduncan reports.
The solid bronze centerboard was an option. The Hinkley CB version has a bronze leading edge but the CB is wood. Well built? All I can say is that mine is still going after 51 years. I sail in the Bay of Fundy and it can get pretty nasty. 8 tons with a 11 foot beam she tends to punch through the water.
 

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I almost bought a Soverel 33 a few years ago. It was designed as a racer, not a cruiser. The hull in the bow area oil canned a little when she really got going. She was FAST & carried a lot of canvas. She was fully powered in 8 knots of breeze. She handled very well during the sea trial. That particular boat was stripped for racing & had no real amenities down below. The 37 looks to be heavier & more robust. I don't know any Soverel owners that are not fond of their boats.
 

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The Soverel 38 was built as a racer/ cruiser. The Idea was to have a fairly comfortable boat that was pretty good in races. They were built with the cruising the Bahamas as a consideration. With 4.6 draft with the board up you could get in over most of the coral reefs. She was in Hopetown Harbour when I bought her in 1974. Now she sails the less than inviting Bay of Fundy with it's fog, stiff currents and the highest tides in the world.
 

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Eleven years to get a first reply to an original post!! That has to be a record!
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I almost bought a Soverel 33 a few years ago. It was designed as a racer, not a cruiser. The hull in the bow area oil canned a little when she really got going. She was FAST & carried a lot of canvas. She was fully powered in 8 knots of breeze. She handled very well during the sea trial. That particular boat was stripped for racing & had no real amenities down below. The 37 looks to be heavier & more robust. I don't know any Soverel owners that are not fond of their boats.
Just for clarity, there were two completely different Soverel 33's. One was designed in 1968 by Bill Soverel. While the design was essentially a late CCA centerboard racer-cruiser, it was much more of a shoal draft cruiser, that it was a boat that could be raced to its rating or a fast boat by any objective standard. Glass work was pretty crude on these boats and so I might expect some oil canning near the bow area, but I would never say these boats carried a lot of canvas.
The other Soverel 33 was designed by Bill's son Mark Soverel. That boat began life as the Soverel 30 which began life as a MORC race boat and was later extended to 33 feet to better suit it to the IOR rule, The Soverel 33 was a super race boat being extermely fast for its day under a broad range of conditions and a blast to sail. They remain competitive under PHRF even today, These boats did have a very generous sail plan, but they had a cored hull with internal framing in the bow area, so I seriously doubt that one of these would have oil-canned unless it had been damaged and poorly repaired.

Jeff
 

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Owned a Soverel 33 1985 model designed by Mark Soverel, built by Pacific Boats. these boats were fantastic sailing boats and very fast in light air. Kinda wish I still had it except for the large head sails when short handed. they were light weight cored hull and deck but very well build and strong boat. some of the early ones had the oil canning problem in the bow and this was fixed by adding a horizontal stringer half way up the inside of the bow section. mine came with the stringer and never saw any oil canning. the 33 was similar in looks to the 30 but a new boat designed for one design racing and at 6500 lbs it was trailerable. requires a very good crew to sail to it's rating in PHRF with an 87 rating. the older Soverel were deigned by Mark's father Bill. Bills designs were all cruising boats that performed fairly well but old designs of the 60's and 70's narrow hulls and not as much space as later designs. money would be better spent on later designs. from the 80's.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Owned a Soverel 33 1985 model designed by Mark Soverel, built by Pacific Boats. these boats were fantastic sailing boats and very fast in light air. Kinda wish I still had it except for the large head sails when short handed. they were light weight cored hull and deck but very well build and strong boat. some of the early ones had the oil canning problem in the bow and this was fixed by adding a horizontal stringer half way up the inside of the bow section. mine came with the stringer and never saw any oil canning. the 33 was similar in looks to the 30 but a new boat designed for one design racing and at 6500 lbs it was trailerable. requires a very good crew to sail to it's rating in PHRF with an 87 rating. the older Soverel were deigned by Mark's father Bill. Bills designs were all cruising boats that performed fairly well but old designs of the 60's and 70's narrow hulls and not as much space as later designs. money would be better spent on later designs. from the 80's.
I had not heard that some of the early boats did not have the same internal structure as the later boats. I looked at buying one of the prototypes and that boat had the horizontal stringers, and transverse frame in the bow.
Of course the Olson built boats (Pacific) were the absolute best of the bunch. I think it was Mark Soverel who told me that George Olson was not satisfied with the fairness of the hulls and so built his own molds.
I also think that it was Mark who told me that the hull for the 30 and the 33 were the same, except that the stern of the 30 was cut off the plug and a new stern graphed on to make the 33.
I am surprised that you found that Soverel 33's were not competitive without great crew work. Around here Soverel 33's were very competitive in PHRF, several competing to win CBYRA highpoint Trophies quite a few times even pretty recently. They seem to do best in light air or races where it is windy enough to do a lot of deep reaching. My sense is that they seem to sail well enough in a broad range of conditions to get pretty consistent podium finishes.

Jeff
 

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I had not heard that some of the early boats did not have the same internal structure as the later boats. I looked at buying one of the prototypes and that boat had the horizontal stringers, and transverse frame in the bow.
Of course the Olson built boats (Pacific) were the absolute best of the bunch. I think it was Mark Soverel who told me that George Olson was not satisfied with the fairness of the hulls and so built his own molds.
I also think that it was Mark who told me that the hull for the 30 and the 33 were the same, except that the stern of the 30 was cut off the plug and a new stern graphed on to make the 33.
I am surprised that you found that Soverel 33's were not competitive without great crew work. Around here Soverel 33's were very competitive in PHRF, several competing to win CBYRA highpoint Trophies quite a few times even pretty recently. They seem to do best in light air or races where it is windy enough to do a lot of deep reaching. My sense is that they seem to sail well enough in a broad range of conditions to get pretty consistent podium finishes.

Jeff
I don't know about the 33 but I can tell you that the 38 with the 1500 bronze centerboard will give a lot of boats a run for their money in a good breeze. In a puff where other boats will round up the 38 with a 1500 lb centerboard hanging 10 feet down is stiff as hell. The rail goes down in the water and she goes like a train. Some years ago in a friendly club race with about 24 boats I started last at the back of the pack since I didn't have an experienced crew. We overtook and passed every boat except 2 stripped down J35's. The wind lightened, all the other boats through up their spinnakers and I was left behind........:confused::confused:.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I don't know about the 33 but I can tell you that the 38 with the 1500 bronze centerboard will give a lot of boats a run for their money in a good breeze. In a puff where other boats will round up the 38 with a 1500 lb centerboard hanging 10 feet down is stiff as hell. The rail goes down in the water and she goes like a train. Some years ago in a friendly club race with about 24 boats I started last at the back of the pack since I didn't have an experienced crew. We overtook and passed every boat except 2 stripped down J35's. The wind lightened, all the other boats through up their spinnakers and I was left behind........:confused::confused:.
I understand that having a 1,500 lb c.b. would be helpful if there was another 7,000-8000 lbs of ballast somewhere else, but with an SA/D around 15 and 18,000 lbs displacement on a 30 foot waterline it would take a really good breeze. ;)
 

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Sail area to displacement was 26.75, with standard sails.

To me, that is a lot of canvass, but I normally look at ocean going boats. Perhaps in other circles that amount of cloth may appear less impressive.
So that is why I distinguished that there were two very different Soverel 33 s. The sailboatdata link is to the Mark Soverel designed Soverel 33. That boat has a very generous sail plan. But while I stand corrected on some of the early boats, the Mark Soverel designed 33's that I knew had cored hulls and stringers and transverse frames in the bow so I questioned the bow oil canning.

The comment you quote out of context refers to the Bill Soverel designed Soverel 33 which has a SA/D less than 15 and that is not much sail area.

Jeff
 

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So that is why I distinguished that there were two very different Soverel 33 s. The sailboatdata link is to the Mark Soverel designed Soverel 33. That boat has a very generous sail plan. But while I stand corrected on some of the early boats, the Mark Soverel designed 33's that I knew had cored hulls and stringers and transverse frames in the bow so I questioned the bow oil canning.

The comment you quote out of context refers to the Bill Soverel designed Soverel 33 which has a SA/D less than 15 and that is not much sail area.

Jeff
Thank you for the clarification.
 
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