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Master Mariner
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Amazing! After more than 5 years aboard this boat, I have found a spinnaker dowser of some sort, in the bottom of a forepeak locker.
Has anybody seen anything like this before and do you have any idea of who made it and/or how to rig it?
It has about a dozen plastic rings of varying sizes and lots of lines and shock cord, with a small block and a round wooden stop(?). Hope the pics help.
 

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Sailboat Reboot
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Are the rings attached to the lines? If not, you are most likely looking at the remains of a douser. Usually they are a long sleeve of fabric. The rings would be attached to the fabric. This way the lines don't get all tangled when you pull all the rings to the top.
 

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Master Mariner
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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, the rings are attached to each other with shock cord and parachute type cord. I doubt this setup had any cloth. The rings appear to be very a slippery plastic, perhaps teflon.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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I would imagine it is rigged the same way as a sock so you hoist the spin with the rings holding the sail, then pull the rings up to the top. Reverse the process to douse.
 

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Sailboat Reboot
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OK
At the top of the rig should be a double loop - most likely steel. The top of the spin gets attached to the bottom (inside) and the top of the loop gets attached to the spin halyard. On the bottom loop there should also be a block.

Now it is easier to explain what you are trying to do then give you specific instructions.

Once the top of the spin is attached to the top of the sock raise the sock up on the halyard. The loops should fall down around the spin so that it is quenched. On the bottom loop there should be some way of raising the loops - one or more lines should go to the block up on top. Usually this line is rigged as a continuous loop. Pull one side, the loops should slide up the sail until they are all bunched at the top. Pull the other side and it should pull the loops down to the bottom quenching the sail.

In strong winds you will not be able to pull down if the spin is full of air so you are going to have to dump it before you can douse it.

Does this help?

Usually the sock is 10 or so feet shorter than the sail. this is to make it easier (so they say but I disagree) to get the clew and tack hooked up. So do not be surprised if it seems a little short. Underway you would drop the halyard that ten feet to get the bottom of the sock to deck level, dump the sail and then quench it.

Also, look at the top of the hoist - climb the mast in calm wind if you can. The rings will be banging against the forestay and may also be moving the top of the spin away from the boat. You need to be careful about chafe.

Fair winds and following seas :)
 

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Looks like a headache waiting to happen. Spring for a sock. My ATN cracked at the hoop and shred my spin. Just replaced it with one from north sails. Cheaper and worked great today!
 

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Old as Dirt!
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Amazing! After more than 5 years aboard this boat, I have found a spinnaker dowser of some sort, in the bottom of a forepeak locker.
Has anybody seen anything like this before and do you have any idea of who made it and/or how to rig it?
It has about a dozen plastic rings of varying sizes and lots of lines and shock cord, with a small block and a round wooden stop(?). Hope the pics help.
The device/set is from the late 1970's early '80's and, at that time, was known as a "Spinnaker Sally", a forerunner to the Spinnaker Sock of today. In the "old days" one would pull the head of a spinnaker through a plastic bucket with the bottom cut out. The buckets had relatively large but weak rubber bands stretched over them and every few feet of sail, one would slip a rubber band off the bucket, around the sail. With the sail "trussed", it was easy to control the hoist and the launch but one was still confronted with recovering the sail which, for a large sail and short handed crew, could be problematic. The Spinnaker Sally came about when someone figured out that by slicing the bucket horizontally and jointing the resulting hoops with lines, one could control the hoist and launch of the sail, and, with a single down-haul to "snuff" the sail, the recovery. It worked, "Kinda", but the theory was (far) better than the reality.

Despite the foregoing, you might want to "give it a whack". It would be an interesting experiment. Or Not.

FWIW...
 

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Yikes... I agree with weinie, that thing looks like a freakin' DISASTER waiting to happen... If ever there was a spinnaker 'sock' designed by Rube Goldberg, that's it... I'd sooner try using it as a drogue/drag device... :)

You might actually be able to snuff a chute in ideal or tame conditions with it. My concern would be during the hoist and unfurling. After the thing is at full hoist, if any part of the chute between any of those hoops begins to fill, you could have a real mess on your hands... Even with an ATN, the sail can sometimes tend to bunch up inside the sleeve as it is hoisted - with that contraption, seems like it would be a virtual guarantee... Not to mention, the potential for fouling that rat's nest on lines on a spreader tip, or something else up the rig?

I wouldn't even bother trying it, put that piece of crap on eBay, ASAP...

:)
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Ahh, where's your sense of adventure Jon? Should fit that contraption to a blooper, go full bore madness :)
 
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