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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone!

I am picking up my new boat today - a 1978 Catalina 30! I'm really excited to get her to her new home and start the punch list of projects to get her ready for a summer of fun sailing. The first project is going to be replacing the jib halyard that broke this winter.
I'm wondering if I could sail her home today (across SF bay) using the spinnaker halyard as a temporary jib halyard....the jib is on a harken roller furling system......the spinnaker halyard, as far as i know, goes all the way to the mast head. Can anyone see any problem to doing this for the short ride home?
Thanks for your help!
cheers
greg
 

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It's going to be an odd angle on the swivel, but it should work.. maybe be a tad conservative on the luff tension for that trip. Or send someone up with some string and 6 inches of bicycle chain, drop a messenger line and feed the new halyard through first!
 

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Congrats on the new to you boat
you could but I would not furl the sail, the haylard might get wrapped around the headstay because the angle of the haylard is about the same as the headstay. the jib haylard needs to be at a 15 degree angle to the forstay and short ( between sail head and sheeve ) so it does not wrap on the forestay when you furl
 

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Discussion Starter #5
overbored:
But don't the spin halyard and the jib halyard come out of the mast in pretty much the same place? If so, why would the angle of the spin halyard be any different from the jib halyard?
thanks everyone for the replies so far!
greg
 

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I wouldn’t use the spin halyard for the jib on my boat for the following reasons. Chafe: The spinnaker block is above the headstay which it will chafe against if used as a jib halyard, you also run the risk of getting a cotter pin for the headstay impaled in the halyard and jamming it. The other big risk is, in normal operation, the headstay stabilizes the upper furling car so the sail can be furled. Often, riggers install line restrainers on the mast to make the proper fairlead to the upper car. Using the spin halyard will tend to rotate the car out of alignment with the tack which opens the possibility of jamming the furling gear (next to overrides, this is the most common cause of furler jams). Another concern is spinnaker blocks are not designed to carry the loads required of a headsail. Breaking the sheave wheel on that block could jam the halyard. If it was my boat, I’d buy a and thread a replacement halyard. And if I couldn’t afford that, I would re-reeve the spinnaker halyard as a proper jib halyard. If the jib halyard is completely missing, I’d go up on the main halyard to do this repair. Or, you can motor your boat over to your new marina.
 

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overbored:
But don't the spin halyard and the jib halyard come out of the mast in pretty much the same place? If so, why would the angle of the spin halyard be any different from the jib halyard?
thanks everyone for the replies so far!
greg
No. A spinnaker halyard should/does run through a block hanging on a crane that projects it outside/above the forestay, so the halyard can swing in front of the forestay, to either side.

I would would use a spinnaker halyard temporarily for a jib, with a few caveats:
1.dont use the furler gear
2. dont use a full hoist jib
3. dont use it too long
 

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I wouldn’t use the spin halyard for the jib on my boat for the following reasons. Chafe:

But in this case the lead would be from the swivel head to the spinn halyard block.. this would spin the swivel around to point towards the spinn halyard crane.. so I don't think chafe would be a serious issue but it's not the position the swivel head is meant to be in.

This is not a good long term situation, I agree, but for a short one shot as long as nothing gets seriously stressed I think it would be OK.. even furling. One problem might be if the crane position does not create a decent angle between the forestay and the 'temporary' halyard lead then halyard wrap might be an issue.
 

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HANUMAN
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overbored:
But don't the spin halyard and the jib halyard come out of the mast in pretty much the same place? If so, why would the angle of the spin halyard be any different from the jib halyard?
thanks everyone for the replies so far!
greg
If it comes out of the top of the mast from a sheave next to the jib halyard it very well may be a second jib halyard. It's fairly common to have this set up.

The spinnaker halyard will probably be external and may lead to a block just forward of the forestay.

Gotta camera with a zoom? Post a pic?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone for the info so far. I'm going over to the boat this afternoon and will check it out.
cheers!
greg
 

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Faster, yes, theoretically the halyard won’t chafe while sailing on the same tack (side) that the spinnaker halyard’s exit on its block. The problem manifests itself when you go over to the opposite tack. Then the line will chafe the underside of the headstay. The nightmare scenario would be the spinnaker halyard block “flipping over” in the same direction that you are unfurling giving you a partial wrap around the headstay and all the associated chafe and jamming potential. I’ve tried to run up a 2nd jib on a foil and I got binding during the hoist. So much that I installed a 2nd jib halyard. Can one use a spin halyard this way without a problem developing? Give it a try and report back. If it was me, I wouldn’t do it on a new to me boat, sailing across the “slot” on SF Bay for the first time. A properly functioning jib halyard is needed for the basic operation of a sailboat a spin halyard is optional. My suggestion is to re-rig it as a jib halyard.
 

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Hello Everyone!

I am picking up my new boat today - a 1978 Catalina 30! I'm really excited to get her to her new home and start the punch list of projects to get her ready for a summer of fun sailing. The first project is going to be replacing the jib halyard that broke this winter.
I'm wondering if I could sail her home today (across SF bay) using the spinnaker halyard as a temporary jib halyard....the jib is on a harken roller furling system......the spinnaker halyard, as far as i know, goes all the way to the mast head. Can anyone see any problem to doing this for the short ride home?
Thanks for your help!
cheers
greg
Having had a jib halyard wrap around the top of the furler in the middle of the bay, I can tell you that sitting on the bow for an hour just this side of the bay bridge trying to sort out the mess is an experience I'd rather not repeat. If the halyard DOES wrap, you get to manually wrap the jib around and around the furler.

I'm not saying don't do it JUST for the one time (though that WOULD be the cautious approach), just to watch carefully what's happening at the top as you furl and unfurl.

You could purchase a new jib halyard and get a rigger to install it before the trip. That's what I'd do I think. Didn't I just see a small craft advisory with gusts to 35 kts? That's a bad time to find out the furler's binding.

Where's the journey from and to? How short is short?
 

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I'm with GeorgesB and the rest of the naysayers on this topic.

We 'accidentally' raised our jib using the spinnaker halyard and our Furlex 101 top unit would not deploy to the top of the stay and got jammed about 3/4 of the way up. PITA to recover from and potentially very bad for your jib if it is left to flog for too long. Not just mildly dangerous but embarrassing too.
 
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