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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was watching a video today that showed how to set a spinnaker.

I have 2 spinnakers and a Flanker on this boat. I also have two different sizes of spinnaker poles.

Just out of curiosity I looked up the prices on those poles. I had absolutely no idea that I have $2000-$4000 in Spinnaker Poles sitting on my deck.

I'm sure this has been asked a 100x, but what is the justification of such high prices for these things? They are literally worth more than a new mainsail on this boat. worth quite a bit more than my car.
 

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They are so expensive because they are made from poluminum, one of the rarest and most expensive metals on the planet. I believe that the only commercial mines for the stuff is in the Republic of Foresparonia. As they have a lock on the poluminum production, they set their own prices.

Spinnaker poles get tremendous loads put on them so they are made of high strength aluminum and the end fittings are super strong. What is your “J” dimension, and how do your two poles compare in size to it? Have you flown all your kites yet? Do you have the various “foot” dimensions. I’m not familiar with the “Flanker” term, perhaps it is what we call a “shy kite” here in San Francisco?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are so expensive because they are made from poluminum, one of the rarest and most expensive metals on the planet. I believe that the only commercial mines for the stuff is in the Republic of Foresparonia. As they have a lock on the poluminum production, they set their own prices.

Spinnaker poles get tremendous loads put on them so they are made of high strength aluminum and the end fittings are super strong. What is your "J" dimension, and how do your two poles compare in size to it? Have you flown all your kites yet? Do you have the various "foot" dimensions. I'm not familiar with the "Flanker" term, perhaps it is what we call a "shy kite" here in San Francisco?
I have never sailed this boat. I don't know how to sail. I am taking lessons this summer.

We are currently "On The Loop" and at a marina waiting for the weather to break so we can start making the boat more loop comfortable.

I don't know much about the two poles. This boat has rigged for racing and seems to have had a run of previous owners who took racing this boat serious. It has lots of upgrades and more sail than I have room to store including a Blade Jib.

So, think of me as the guy who doesn't know how to drive but just bought a race car.

The mainsail is fairly news and I think the previous mainsail might be serviceable, but I have no idea. It literally has small holes in parts of it.
 

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You probably have one spinnaker pole and one whisker pole. The spinnaker pole will be larger in diameter and fixed in length, the whisker pole will be smaller in diameter and adjustable in length. The spinnaker pole will have lines running along it for an uphaul, downhaul, and pole end release lines. The whisker pole is likely rigged more simply and just has the release.

They can be cheaper on the used market. I bought my pole for $60, it came off of a boat that was raced heavily. The pole itself is in rough shape (but usable for my needs) and the ends are good.

New whisker poles for a 30' boat are in the $400-$2000 range. New spinnaker poles are more.
 

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Pearson, congratulations! Enjoy the journey. Remember, first walk, then run. And always feel free to ask questions. Check your poles like Alex says. Spinnaker poles are always fixed length and most rules say they cannot be longer than the distance from your mast to the bow (headstay actually, this is your “J” dimension). If one of the poles is adjustable, it is a whisker pole and is used to hold out your genoa when running downwind. If one of your poles is a little short stubby one, that is a reaching strut (say, 3 feet long or so). Leave that one in your garage, basement, or attic - you are not ready for that one yet.

If you are bored with all the snow, take your kites home and measure the distances between the three cringles and report back. We will then try and figure out what you have then. You might also want to keep all your kites at home in a dry, ventilated place as again, these are “graduate” level sails and you will first be taking “Intro to Sailing 101”.
 

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I think a Flanker was a spinnaker made from heavier cloth for higher winds. You'll want to get them out of the bags just to make sure none got put away wet.
And you can probably store some of them at home as George suggested for a week or two.
 

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As long as we are on the subject of poles.... Anyone want to hazard a guess as to what these two are? They were left onboard from the PO and I've been kicking them around the cabin the last couple of years. Overall length is 64" X 1.25". They are marked P and S so I assume they are specifically used on their respective side. Any info would be appreciated :D





 

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Poluminum?

Damn. I thought spin poles were made from spinuminum.

Most whisker poles are not adjustable.
Spin poles have to be much bigger in Dia due to the compresssive load they see when you are spin reaching with the pole on the heasstay.
That is why they invented reaching struts. ( short little poles used with spin poles to increase the vector of the spin guy and reduce compression.)
If you never put the pole on the headstay then you can get away with a far lighter pole. If all you want to do is go wing and wing you can get away with a toothpick.
 

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They are made out of spinuminum too? I saw a chunk of spinotite in the Smithsonian Hall of Minerals once. Impressive stuff. Me bad on the adjustable comment. My pole adjusts, I assumed everyone's did.
 

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Just out of curiosity I looked up the prices on those poles. I had absolutely no idea that I have $2000-$4000 in Spinnaker Poles sitting on my deck.
Chances are you don't... Not even if they're carbon fiber, and the end fittings are unobtanium...:)

$4K in poles might be possible if both are carbon fiber, and one was an all-carbon line control whisker pole... I doubt that would be the case on a used Pearson 30 :)
 

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3" one is the spinnaker pole, the smaller expandable one is the whisker pole.

Don't use the whisker pole with a spinnaker unless you want to see it explode.

You can leave both (and your spinnakers) at home for the time being, they are something to use once you've got some sailing experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
3" one is the spinnaker pole, the smaller expandable one is the whisker pole.

Don't use the whisker pole with a spinnaker unless you want to see it explode.

You can leave both (and your spinnakers) at home for the time being, they are something to use once you've got some sailing experience.
I've kept them "at home" since I bought the boat. I just wish "At Home" was someplace not taking up space on my deck. I've seen some mounted on the front of the mast. I'd like to get a mount like that.
 

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My pole adjusts, I assumed everyone's did.
Mine used to, last time I tried it wouldn't budge. :eek:
I went out with someone in a similar situation to you, he kept saying "It's just all these ropes !! There's so many of them it's confusing, I gotta get rid of some of them !!"
 

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I've kept them "at home" since I bought the boat. I just wish "At Home" was someplace not taking up space on my deck. I've seen some mounted on the front of the mast. I'd like to get a mount like that.
The mast-front mounts are quite expensive.

When you've done some sailing you should go out on another boat that is equipped with a spinnaker (and where the skipper is experienced in using it) and fly it with them. That will give you an idea of if you'll even want one. Depending on your sailing venue an asymmetric spinnaker might be a better choice. They are easier to launch and fly, especially if you only have a small crew.

Used good quality (tri-radial, fabric in good shape) spinnakers for 30' boats are selling for $300-$700 on eBay these days. Panel cut ones are worth less. You can probably sell the pole for $100-$200 if it is in good shape.
 

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They are so expensive because they are made from poluminum, one of the rarest and most expensive metals on the planet. I believe that the only commercial mines for the stuff is in the Republic of Foresparonia. As they have a lock on the poluminum production, they set their own prices.
:laugher There are deposits of poluminum near Seldengrad, as well. They require rare conditions to form: a peat bog with tightly woven vegetable fibers must burn to create a carbon felt, which is then infused with amber resin from dying epox gougeonus beetles. The poluminum is carefully extracted with a core drill, lubricated by injecting a slurry of liquified dollar bills. The core is then lathed to finished diameter. Exacting work, mostly carried out in Poland or Sevastopol.
 

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In praise of that expensive and seldom used (by most cruisers) spinnaker pole taking up room on deck,

A good number of passagemakers who got dismasted and lost the rig, survived and reached shore only because of an emergency mast made from the lowly spinny pole, with a spare jib rigged sideways:

The Annapolis Book of Seamanship: Fourth Edition - John Rousmaniere - Google Books

So say nice things to it, you never know....;-)
 
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