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I have a Catalina 25 with a roller furling.

I have never used a spin sail before ( but kinda understand the use ).

Since I have a roller in the front, I don't have the normal "metal line" that goes to the top of the mast for sails.

Do some boats have more than one "metal" line ( what is the name? ).

Or am I way off?
 

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If you want to get into spinnaker sailing there's a lot of gear to buy - the halyard for the spinnaker needs to be installed, you'll need a pole and its control lines, and of course the sail itself. All new this could run you a fair bit of money.

From your questions so far I'd suggest that you find some good books on sailing and sailing terminology so that we can better answer your questions!
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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The asymmetric cruising spin will cost about the same, but has a little less hassle installing an flying it. A traditional spin requires a pole, pole topping lift, and a pole downhaul. You'll also need to store the pole, usually with pole mounts that attach to your lifeline stanchions. Then there's more work involved with flying the spin with a pole. First you have to set up the pole, which means attaching it to your topping lift and downhaul, and clipping it to the mast ring and the guy (the sheet that goes on the windward side is the guy) You'll have 2 lines to play (the sheet and the guy), plus adjustments to the topping lift and downhaul.

An asymmetric spin has only the downhaul that attaches to the tack, and 2 sheets at the clew. Spin Sets and takedowns are a little easier as you don't have the pole to deal with. The other difference is that the A-spin cannot sail dead downwind. A-spins tend to be a little faster though, as evidenced by having to take a lower phrf rating with an A-spin.
 

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Seems a bit daunting..
Can I use a spin sail when sailing solo?


A poled out spinnaker - unlikely

A gennaker (asymmetrical) in a dousing bag - perhaps

Jack
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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Seems a bit daunting..
Can I use a spin sail when sailing solo?
If you can set, fly, and douse a poled out spin, and drive the boat at the same time, sailing solo, then you are a stud and I want you to crew on my boat.

I know people who singlehand while flying an asymmetric spin, even without a sock. It's a lot of work, but possible.
 

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I use a standard symmetrical spinnaker frequently while sailing solo. I don't do it in strong winds but up to 10 knots no problem. You would want to practice with crew first.
Remember if you are in a 10 knot wind and you get the boat moving in the direction of the wind, say 4 knots the apparent wind is only 6 knots which I find pretty easy to handle a decent sized spinnaker (mast head, 30 foot boat.)

To set I lock the heading so I am setting the spin in the sheltered area behind the main. I have both sheets tight so half the spin is backwinded on itself. Then once back in the cockpit I adjust the sheets so that the spin opens. Then I run forward and set the pole.

The hardest part, I found is dousing, I have gotten the spinnaker wet a few times:eek: mostly because the spin halyard is led aft to the cockpit and I want to control it from the fore deck.

I find sailing solo with a spinnaker a very pleasant experience!!
 

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Reccommend that you catch a ride on another boat a few times when they are going to race. You will then learn how the spinnaker is rigged and used.
The time spent as crew on that other boat will really help you learn to sail your own boat.
 

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Reccommend that you catch a ride on another boat a few times when they are going to race. You will then learn how the spinnaker is rigged and used.
The time spent as crew on that other boat will really help you learn to sail your own boat.
Excellent advice!!
 

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You asked a couple of questions that I don't think have been answered:

I have a Catalina 25 with a roller furling.

Since I have a roller in the front, I don't have the normal "metal line" that goes to the top of the mast for sails.
I think what you're saying is that you don't have the "normal metal line" [i.e., the twisted wire cable headstay, commonly referred to as the "headstay"] that goes to the top of the mast. If your boat had the cable headstay, your sails would be said to be "hanked on." Instead, your headsail slides into a slot that is attached to your headstay, called, among other things, a "headfoil."

Do some boats have more than one "metal" line ( what is the name? ).
Yes. My boat, for example, has a headfoil with two slots, so you can raise two headsails at the same time for downwind sailing, or, you can raise one headsail before you lower the other one.

Some boats have two headstays, but you don't see it too often. It's mostly done by long distance cruisers, who want to ensure that their rig won't come down while at sea.

In short, the terms that I think you're looking for are "headstay" and "headfoil."
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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Just to make things a little more confusing, many times the headstay is still present but hidden from view inside the aluminum foil.
 

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Ok. I have no halyards ( since I have a roller ).
So I couldn't use a spin anyways.
You do have a halyard. You've just never seen it because it's all the way at the top of your "roller" setup. If you want to get your jib down someday (really down, not just rolled up) you will need to ease the halyard and pull it down.
 
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