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Crealock 37
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676 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While the boat is sitting in the slip during the winter I like to have a couple low power air dryer fans running to help with condensation/mold/etc.

My concern is if there is a power outage (not uncommon due to avalanche or high winds over the winter) my batteries might be discharged since the inverter will continue to power the dryers. On my boat everything goes through the heart interface, it's not possible to isolate the AC side.

Would this work? Split the shore power cable with one side going to the normal connection for the boat, the other side being a 3-prong female "household" plug I could connect an extension cord to for running the air dryers?
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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5,179 Posts
Maybe I'm not understanding your problem correctly.. but couldn't you just run the extension cord from a spare AC outlet on your shore power box dockside - along with your usual shore power cable? Tape them together if you need to..
 

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Could make up a shore side splitter and run the two cords from there. Probably one male 30 amp in, one 30 amp and one 15 amp female out. This conveniently ignores legal breaker requirements on the 15 amp circuit if the dock is 30 amp. So? I've made these up so able to plug in power tools on the dock without draping the cord back from the cockpit.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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5,179 Posts
If most dock boxes are like mine, they only have one outlet.
Then plug into your next-dock neighbours one when he isn't looking. ;)

There'll be a spare someplace. It's not uncommon around here to see an extension lead being run half-way across the marina...
 

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Catalina 400 MKII
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AC being Alternating Current, I presume. If you have an Inverter/Changer, they often have a setting to isolate the inverter to the off position. At any rate, I have done what you propose. I have a splitter on the dock. One side goes to 30 Amp, which goes to the boat. The other side of the Y is a typical house style plug. I bought a 50 Amp extension cord (it was expensive) which I run into the boat so that I can run some extra heaters in the winter when we are at the dock overnight. Works fine. I don't leave it hooked up, however, when I'm off the boat.
 

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Assuming your shore power comes in to a breaker panel with a feed from the panel to the inverter, is there a spare breaker you can use to feed a circuit for a convenience outlet or two?
 

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Mold would be pretty unusual in the dead of winter in the northern latitudes, unless you already have an active colony. Cold winter air can't hold much moisture, so it's naturally dry.

Most marina's around here won't allow a boat to be plugged in, on the hard, while away. Batteries only need to be topped up every 4 to 6 weeks, assuming they are fully disconnected and not drained by parasitic load. We also put Kanberra Gel aboard, which seems to work best in closed unvented environments. All cabinets are opened and about a dozen buckets of Dry-rid are placed around in the sinks, etc. She is vented with fresh, cold, dry air, each time we stop by to top charge the batts.
 

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I would be a bit reluctant to make a Y connection in the shore power cord, as it is then far less weather-proof. It could even be a serious safety hazard.

Far better to do your connection inside the boat, and have an unbroken shore power cable.
 
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