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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's spring in Michigan and time for maintenance. I have a pretty big list this year and had some questions.

The PO directly attached the instrument cluster power leads and the radio to the batteries by wrapping the stripped wires around the terminals. I wanted to clean this up with a terminal block or something. The batteries are in the cockpit locker. Is a small bus bar for each leg acceptable? I was just going to install one for pos and one for negative on the wall directly above the batteries.

I've also found Maine Sail's recommendations on replacing cutlass bearings, I'll need to find out my diameter later, I was wonder if someone had recommendations for removing the shaft coupler so I can get this all out. I'll also be repacking the stuffing box. I have no idea when that was last done.

I also have no info on transmission oil change from the PO, so that should be an adventure.

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

- Randall
 

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I suspect there is some sort of ABYC code for protecting the bus bars from being exposed and shorted.

Just draw the trans fluid out through the dip stick or fill hole with a pump and replace. Couldn't be easier.
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Engine oil and tranny fluid should be a breeze.

Removing the coupler from the output flange from the engine was easy for us.
Removing the coupler from the shaft, not so much.
I'd go and buy a steering wheel puller from a NAPA or similar autoparts place. You will need some longer bolts that match your coupler bolts if whatever comes with the shaft puller doesn't.
"V" drive or direct drive or geared drive on your M 30' OI?
G'luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't think it's a V drive, but I'm not familiar with the other two types.
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Randall,
A direct drive engine is probably the most common set up with most smaller boats. This is where the output shaft of the engine faces the stern and connects directly to the shaft.

A geared or reduction drive (typically 2:1) is more common on bigger, heavier boats so they can swing a larger prop behind the boat.

With a "V" drive set up the engine output shaft faces forward and connects to the "V" drive gearbox which then spins a shaft that runs back toward the transom. With this set up parts of the drive train can be 'buried' underneath the engine making it difficult to work on the stuffing box etc without moving the engine. I asked because I was on a 36' Morgan that had the "V" drive set up.

Hopefully you have a direct drive set up as it is fairly straight forward to work on, depending on the boat.
 

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No DC panel? Normally the instruments will be powered off the panel and the circuit protected by a circuit breaker. Running them off the battery directly without protection is dangerous. At least you need a fuse in the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, it's a straight drive then.

There is a DC panel, and the instruments are switched, but the PO didn't do it quite right. I think he ran a leg directly from the battery to a switch on the panel ... I guess I need to pull the panel off and see what's in there. The instrument wires all need to be replaced at the very least anyway. There are splices all over, and they aren't run cleanly, which means it's pretty hit or miss if they work at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here's hoping my poor man's prop puller works :) I have an old C clamp with the end split into a Y. I think it's pretty much the same thing ... I need to get it all apart this weekend so I can get an idea of all the parts I need to order and what sizes. I'll also check the condition of the stuffing box. Hopefully it just needs to be repacked.
 

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Beneteau F310 ~ APOTHIC
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If you have a few electronic items to put in, and need an easy way to add more than you have switches for I'm a really big fan of the Blue Seas Fuse Blocks. Unless you're doing something crazy, you can usually feed it with a 10AWG wire, and run 14AWG to the branches. Of course, you want to check amperage and be safe, but that was well within specs for what I needed.

I ran a feed from the main house bank bus to the panel breaker labeled "Electronics", and then on to the blue sea block. This feeds my radio, VHF, and whatever gizmos I add in the future have an easy place to integrate.

Great way to clean up raw battery post wraps and make them safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I pumped out the transmission and replaced the fluid. I didn't have any problems. I also did our annual oil change. No problems there.

The prop and shaft were a different matter altogether. I don't have my cutlass in a strut, and the prop is only a few inches in front of the rudder. The rudder came off with only a few issues getting the brass key out of the rudder shaft. The prop was a royal pain. I tried a C-clamp that had a split on one end thinking it looked a lot like a prop puller. I couldn't get enough torque on the end to break it loose, and ended up renting a real prop puller. Then, we got to the shaft. That took a lot of convincing to get out, and it wasn't pretty when we did. The packing nut had been overtightened, presumably for several years. It was quite worn down. It was also worn down, though not as bad, around the cutlass bearing. I took it to a machine shop and was told it would cost 250 to repair. I'll be checking prices on a new shaft tomorrow.

I tried getting the cutlass bearing out by cutting through the brass in two spots. This seemed like a good idea except for two complications. 1) I'd read others used a screw driver to "pry" the edge of the cutlass bearing up. Unfortunately, my cutlass bearing is glassed in, and doesn't have a metal sleeve or anything. So I started to cut into the glass. 2) The brass sleeve of the cutlass bearing is really thick, and doesn't take well to bending. I tried all manner of plier-like devices and couldn't get it to crush. I finally decided to call a proper mechanic and have him do it properly. I'd rather not do any more damage in my amateur musings.
 

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We got a new ~36" long SS shaft this winter for $225. Why pay $250 to have the old one repaired when a brand new one should cost less then the repair? You might get something back by recycling your old shaft for scrap.

These press fit fittings on the drive train are not easy to get apart after they have been together for a while.

Your experience with your Cutless bearing sound a bit bizarre. Probably a good thing to call in a 'marine mechanic' to help out. You could end up doing more harm then good if you were trying to cut through the stern tube (which is what the Cutless gets press fitted into).

A fairly long winded account of doing our drive train (Cutless included) with pictures is here: 2011, November 30th. Begin drive train rebuild | Odalisque
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Caleb, I just got my measurements to deep blue yacht supply and it's going to be 200. I just need to verify set screw divots and any other features are going to line up.

The cutlass is bizarre. I don't see a brass stern tube, just glass. That said, the glass may be wrapped around the end of the stern tube, so I can't see it. But I'd just as soon let someone w experience look at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got deeper into this this weekend. The stern tube is a ceramic-like material. I ended up putting a socket wrench socket of roughly the same size as the cutlass, attaching and extension and hitting it with a hammer until the cutlass came out. The glass I saw was wrapped around the end of the stern tube, so I did no major damage.

Between taking down the rudder, removing the prop shaft, and the cutlass it's been about three days of work, but most of that is learning my way around unfamiliar aspects of mechanics. I also got to replacing the impeller. It had 2.5 fins missing. I suspect the engine will be much happier this year.
 
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