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I have sailed with a lazy bag for the least 4 seasons - wont go back..
Used to have lazy jacks and sail cover, while cruising we now cover the sail when not in use.

These comments are based om my setup - I know there are lots of different designs around.
  • It does not interfere with reefing lines or outhaul.
  • It can be stowed along the boom if I will improve air flow around the lower part of the sail
My main is loose footed and the lazy bag sits in the luff rope track on the boom.
There is a batten on both sides to stiffen up the cover, I can also roll the cover onto the battens to stove it on the boom.

The lazy jacks are integrated into the system, there are 4 attachment points on each side made of strong webbing.

I have used SS rings to link the lines (less friction than rope/rope, cheap, noting to chafe the sail)

The bottom part of the cover is made of some mesh , except for aft part where it is open and only attached with webbing straps and slugs.

The cover are held together around the mast with webbing strops.

In this photo the cover is rolled onto the batten and secured to the boom.
The lazy jacks are led forward and one of the SS rings are visible.



Her you can see the hook used to hold the cover in place, notice that the hook opens downwards. You can also see the mesh in the bottom of the bag.


This is the opposite side withe the eye and the bungee loop.


At the end off the boom no mesh only two webbing straps with slugs holding it in place while giving room for reefing lines and outhaul.
 

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I have a Mack Pack system from Mack Sails.

Its one of the best improvements we've made and their product is less expensive than competing similar products.

Well worth taking a serious look imho.

I must admit the one thing I dread is putting the mainsail away. I have lazyjacks with a conventional sail-tie and buckle-down cover setup. I have uttered many profanities at the end of the sailing day.

What's the scoop on the Stack-Pack or mainsail drop-bag (term?) setup? I've seen a few threads on the subject, but I'm still confused?

- Can this type of bag work with my existing lazyjacks?

- Do you have to have full-batten sail for this system? Doyle shows full battens in their photos.

- Can't you just have a canvas shop make one that works around the lazys and flake it into the bag as you zip it up?

- Can the bag roll and tie up along the boom or does it have to stay vertically extended under sail?

- I'd like to see your setup if you have one!

- David
 

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I made a set of stowable lazy jacks for my boat and the two charter boats I crewed on both had them. I have not the issue with lazy jacks that people have mentioned here. My boat has partial battens, one of the charter boats was a gaff rig, and one was marconi with full battens. I am just not sure why people have so many problems with them. In my opinion they are the biggest bang for your buck. I find them almost essential for single-handing.
 

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Something I didn't mention in my previous post; I have done a fair bit of sailing on a boat with in-mast furling and on the boat with lazyjacks that I mentioned.

I'd take even the less than optimized lazyjacks any day over the in-mast furling. Easier to use, better sail shape and area, no jamming in the mast, WAY cheaper - it's no contest in every way.
 
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I have the stack pack on my current boat, and had a Dutchman system on my prior boat. Both of them have pluses and minuses, but both are more convenient that a loose cover. The biggest negatives on the stack pack are that it takes a considerable amount of fiddling with the adustment of the lines each season until I get them optimized. It is also true that a little care needs to be taken to avoid the battens catching in the lazyjacks when raising sail, but that is not a big deal at all. The Dutchman was also a pretty good system, though that boat had an older sail and did not flake quite so smoothly as other seem to expect. Either system is pretty good.
 

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I saw a lazy jack system where the lazy jacks went through blocks on the spreaders (flag halyard block was replaced with a double block to take lazy jack and flag halyard). this kept the lazy jacks from chafing the sail. The lazy jack lines went under the boom and back up the other side so when slacked off (with boom supported by topping lift or boom gallows) a regular sail cover could be installed. Cost = 2 double blocks (or just mount a single next to the single flag halyard block), and enough line to make the lazy jacks. My boat has a "jiffy reef" reefing system and I use the hooks on the boom when making up my lowered sail, a length of 1/4" line running back and forth the length of the boom then pulled tight....nice neat and cheap.
 

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We installed the dutchman system on our last boat when we had a new main built Took about a season to get the sail broken in but once that was done the system worked great. The main would fold itself in perfect flakes. The cover had to be modified to fit around the lines.
We have in boom furling on the current boat and I'd never go back. Fully battened main that goes up and down from the cockpit very quickly. Takes seconds to put the main away. Infinite reefing too. Down side is cost. Ours was $17k
Jim
 

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I'm a poor sailor.....17K......that's what I paid for my boat. Marketing in this country is trying to get people to rely on "pre-made stuff" and frowns on ingenuity....I think I'll figure out something myself
 

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For 17K I would expect to get a new mainsail, running and standing rigging a couple of headsails and maybe a storm try....and $10,000 change. My boat is 30', I just replaced the standing rigging with 300' of 1/4 316SS and am replacing halyards with 350' 3/8" and main sheet with 40-50' 7/16" low stretch Samson braid and have been pricing new sails so I have already figured the cost. I look around I can't afford to pay the first person I find to "have it done".
 

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some people do their own work and some people have been led to believe that they are incompetant and need to have a professional do everything for them...it's what keeps the marine industry alive, the concept that people have to have thing done for them by a professional and can't learn to do themselves....it's a trickle down of our whole economy.
It's the boaters that have more money than time and are willing to "have work done" that allows us poor boaters who are willing to do the work alive.
In the horse world there is a saying "Some horse owners muck their own stalls, and some have their stalls mucked for them"...same thing applies to boats. If you are too busy working to make money to pay the professionals to do the work for you you don't have the time to do it yourself.
I could not afford to have a fraction of the stuff I have done, done for me. One thing about learning to do for yourself when things do breakdown (and they will) you can fix them.
 

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$17K for a main for a 40' is highway robbery, no matter how fancy it is.
 

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John,

I am going to "build" a stackpack fashioned after the kit Sailrite offers. Have you seen that one? I would like to get some feedback on the design before I start. It will be a wonderful upgrade to manage the main with simplicity.

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John,

I am going to "build" a stackpack fashioned after the kit Sailrite offers. Have you seen that one? I would like to get some feedback on the design before I start. It will be a wonderful upgrade to manage the main with simplicity.

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I would be interested in this review as well...I am one of those "poor sailors" that enjoys the "projects"
 

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I studied the forums and decided that the EZ-Jax system would be best for me. I like that the EZ-Jax retract out or the way, so that you can use them with an unmodified sailcover, and the battens cannot get caught when raising the sail.

I placed an order, and never received it... They never charged my credit card either. After several conversations and email exchanges over two months with the owner of the business, in which he apologized for losing the order, I finally told him to cancel the order.

I studied the design, and built my own out of red and green (port & starboard) ¼" Sta-Set for less than ½ the cost of the EZ-Jax system.

These are one of the best improvements that I have made to the boat!
 

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I studied the forums and decided that the EZ-Jax system would be best for me. I like that the EZ-Jax retract out or the way, so that you can use them with an unmodified sailcover, and the battens cannot get caught when raising the sail-eherlihy.
We love our EZ jacks and bought them a cuplke years ago. I added the lines so I can deploy them from the cockpit. Still have to go forward to pull them back,, but you can do that once anchored or at the dock.

If anythuing vreaks ( or when) I will fix myself. Glad you did it yourself. I will have questions eventually.
 
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