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I love my Stainless Steel anchor!

Hello Fellow Sailors:

I love my stainless steel anchor. It s beautiful! It also has never hit the water in 3 years as I never anchor out! My family loves marinas.

Big Moe
 

· Sea Slacker
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btw, all those tests show "hydrobubble" anchors doing pretty well. but there aren't any seemeingly sold or manufactured. what gives? where are those hydrobubble anchors? seems like a good idea (even if it looks a bit, erm, unusual)?
 

· Telstar 28
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I think that Hydrobubble went out of business. :) Given that their homepage is no longer active... that might be a good bet.
 

· Anchorsmith
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Stainless steel is fine for anchors, the correct marine grades are perfectly fit for purpose, and problems resulting from cheapies shouldn't slur the good quality ones. 316L is however expensive, and high tensile grades like 2205 to maintain shank strength are even more expensive. Hand polished SS versions of galv designs should be something like at least 3x the price, all things equal. If not, something's compromised...

Take a look at: Anchor materials (Rocna Knowledge Base)

Some stainless steel pornography:
www.rocna.com/images/remote/rocna-55-stainless-gallery.pdf

And re the Fortress / Danforth:
Old generation anchors (PeterSmith.net.nz)
 

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I have a stainless anchor that came with my boat. I anchor out a lot but I don't know about the PO. Whatever, my anchor is in good shape, is far from new and when I did an Ardrox crack test on it last year, there were no signs of any stress cracks.
 

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Hello Fellow Sailors:
I love my stainless steel anchor. It s beautiful! It also has never hit the water in 3 years as I never anchor out! My family loves marinas.
Big Moe
:) :) :)
"Price" seems fairly decisive when choosing anchors. It is, after all, one of the items to label "consumable" on board. People lose anchors, you may have to cut loose and run in some emergencies, and boating neighbors can create all kinds of tangles.

I use a Spade as primary and Fortress as No.2, and it has worked well, not inexpensive, but not pure luxury either. Not to discount "quality," and certainly not ignoring design efficiencies, most of us will draw the line somewhere. It is not difficult to take anchoring to an art form if money is no object - you could add a Swisstech marker buoy with furling lines (it costs as much as the anchor itself), you could have a solar-powered strobe light for the marker buoy, not to mention half a dozen clever substitutes for the plain bosun's hook - but unless you live at anchor for months, is it strictly necessary? To me, functionality beyond the basics tastes too much like a decorated mobile home surrounded by a garden and the obligatory garden gnomes.

Stainless steel? Not bad. Next question: how much?
 

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Adamlein - they seem so ubiquitously marketed, even by respectable manufacturers like Manson and Rocna.
Perhaps just because their customers want them?? - Here you will never see any « lancha » (motor boats) with a galvanized anchor - they MUST be stainless...

OsmundL - the most common mistake is to leave too short a chain in the water.
Again a classical perceived wisdom - Holding is given by the anchor and SCOPE is important - Chain is only the best mean to avoid chaffing the line on the aggressive sea bottom.

Sailingdog - The Bruce…. They were really designed for use as very large anchors for stationary oil platforms
Again and again another classical perceived wisdom - Bruce company is a manufacturer of large anchors for stationary oil platforms - But the Bruce anchor used for pleasure boats has NEVER been designed nor used to hold oil platforms - the anchors used for this purpose are a completely different design.

Brak - for holding power and setting ability Fortress consistently comes out on top of all tests
Setting ability is one of the PROBLEMS of the Fortress anchor - and do you know why the Fortress anchor has a big holding power ?? Only because tests are done in relation with the WEIGHT of the anchors.
If you compare the Fortress with any other steel anchor - weight for weight, it has three times the steel anchor surface area.. and therefore also about three time its holding..
Try the Fortress with the same blade surface area than steel anchors, and the holding of the Fortress will be quite modest !..

Brak all those tests show "hydrobubble" anchors doing pretty well. but there aren't any seemingly sold or manufactured.
Although it is important to have a good product - the way of MARKETING it is much more important - Hydrobulb anchor was the clear winner of SAIL magazine testing 2006 - but look who is using the (modified) results of this test to promote his anchor ??-

It is also interesting to see some manufacturers who promote the use of high tensile steel for their galvanized anchors and use 316 stainless steel for their stainless steel anchors - Mechanical characteristics of 316 stainless steel are nearly identical than mechanical characteristics of mild carbon steel..

João
 

· Telstar 28
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The problem is that crevice corrosion damage is CUMULATIVE...so, continued use leads to further degradation, and the failure can occur with little warning. :)
Guys
How long do you think a ss anchor would have to be burried in the mud to have a problem? Do use your anchor instead of a mooring for those who are not at a dock?
 
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