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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 1980 H30 has a "frozen" main sheave. All of the standing rigging is the original from 1980. As the mast has to come down to replace the sheaves I plan on replacing all of the standing rigging as well as the lights and wiring. I have good mechanical skills but little experience with rigging. Other than adjusting shroud tension, my only rigging experience was assisting a friend install roller furling on a Catalina 27. I have a pretty extensive set of mechanics tools but no swage tools or experience in cutting or swaging steel cables. I have three questions; is it possible to order shrouds cut to length with the hardware (eyes, turnbuckles, etc.) already attached, and can anyone recommend a source? Otherwise, is it less trouble than I am supposing and I should do everything myself, or lastly, is it a major job with serious safety concerns that I should leave to the professionals? I have already found a rigger to "build" the new rigging, but his schedule is booked solid for several weeks, and I typically prefer to do my own boat projects. Thanks in advance for any input.
 

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Otter
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I would hire a professional. Rigging is definitely one of those things you don't want to learn on your own. It's worth the wait. I replace my rigging every 5 years to be safe. I don't know if you have ever been on a boat that has dis masted itself but I haven't. I have seen it happen and knew I would not want to experience that myself. The wait is worth the safety factor.
 

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On the east coast a place like rigging only is used by DIY owners

You just remove you old stuff ,roll it up and UPS it to them and a week later a box with new stuff comes and you just put it on with some caution and common since





 

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Ive vernon a dismasted boat. I would also hire a professional. I am on day one of my new standing rigging and it was a process. There were a number of other things I did not know needed to be done that was only apparent after the mast was off. They can tell you what needs to be done. You might want to take off your chainplates and look for corrosion where they pass through the deck.

I'm sure you're handier than I am, and I helped, but it's really the glue that holds everything together. Do you have options in your area? It would probably help the cost if they had competition. If it's just the one place and they are that booked, he's not likely to cut youa good deal.
 

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You can get all the tech details about rigging with books like Brian Toss's Rigger's Apprentice. Check out his website. I agree with giving your rigging to an outfit and have them copy it. Don't go just by the measurements. Wouldn't try to swage my own a lot of risk there could end up wasting a lot of expensive wire. The only exception is if you're going the swageless route like Norsman for which it's common to DIY.
 

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I was really apprehensive about replacing all of my rigging myself, but sticker shock of having a rigger do the whole thing for me forced me to do it myself. A good friend of mine who owns a boatyard encouraged me and said that it isn't rocket science and if you have your old stays/shrouds then you don't even need to do any math. He was right, as soon as I made up my first shroud I could see how strong the mechanical fittings are and I have no doubt that they will hold up nicely.

Northoceanbeach makes a good point about the chainplates, they certainly should be pulled and checked if they haven't before. There is a decent possibility that they could be suffering from crevice corrosion after 34 years. I replaced all 6 shroud chainplates on mine because they had issues.

There's 2 DIY routes you can take:
1. Send your old stays/shrouds to RiggingOnly or another reputable rigger and have them swage up everything for you as Tommays said. I seriously considered that, and it probably would have been slightly cheaper than the route I chose, but my old rig had some seriously unnecessary toggles and other bits that were used to make up the difference for several shrouds that were too short and I wasn't comfortable sending them into a rigger and telling them to use the old shroud as a template, but add 3.25" in length. It's not that they couldn't do it, I just didn't want to leave that to someone who hasn't seen the entire rig.

2. Order your new shrouds and stays with the top end swaged with an eye, have each piece of wire a foot longer than you know you need, and order a mechanical compression fitting to do yourself. I used Hayn Hi-Mod because they have a castellated crown ring that makes arranging the wire strands a breeze and they were recommended by Brion Toss (He certainly knows his rigging) and that they are the only terminal certified to 100% breaking strength of the wire itself. Installing the fittings is simply a matter of laying the new wire next to the old, marking the cut line and cutting the wire with a hacksaw. I bought a new blade for the job and taped the wire where I was going to cut. I was surprised how quickly it cut. The instructions are really easy and there are several YouTube videos that show how it's done. It took me 1.5 hours to do 3 wires, but most of the time was spent on the first. I did a write up on my blog (Magic #16) just last week.
 

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Read my posts from this past April. I just did the entire refit of the mast and rigging also. I did all the work myself, but I hired a pro rigger to measure and order the rigging. It was delivered to me, I did all the work.

Now here's another point you might consider. After I did all the work and restepped the mast, I hired the same guy for a couple hours and he "docked tuned" the boat with me... all the while I was gaining knowledge input I'd never get out of a book. I was actually doing the work and learning. Kind of like OJT in a tech school. I then tuned the rig out on the water and now feel very confident about anything rigging (for MY boat).

Dave
 

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J,

Lots of great info.

How deep are your pockets? Have a rigging shop do them, about $110 per line. Buy the wire rope and StaLok fittings. about $110 per line. The benefit of StaLok is inspection. Some folks will have swaged fittings at the pole and mechanical fittings at the deck for this reason. Water, salt or other, drains down the wire and into the grooves, following it into the fitting where it begins to corrode. Mechanicals can be removed and re-installed. You might need to replace the cone.
 

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I made up all new shrouds and stays for my 28-footer using Norseman terminals. 8 lines with all-new hardware (bought from Rigging-Only) was ~$1800; it would have been twice that to have done (though my mast was already off the boat).

It was VERY easy if one just takes care (measure twice, cut once). I did ruin one terminal dry-fitting it and galling the threads... use thread protectorant and perhaps buy extra Norseman (or Sta-Lok) hardware with right-of-return if any is unused.
 

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You are in San Diego. There are several rigging shops there, and you could probably find one that you could coordinate the timing with your mast removal/yard time. You don't have to do it by mail. I do almost all the various mechanical jobs on my boat (and my vehicles) myself, but there are some things I leave to the professionals. Rigging is one. I have used a local rigger (Newport Beach) whose prices were less than do-it-yourself ideas, the jobs were done very fast, and above all, it was done right. Check around your area, and go talk to some in person.
 

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J,

If you do have, "I have good mechanical skills" DO IT YOURSELF. It's NOT that hard and often times you will get a better job. I can't tell you how many times over the years that I have seen a few "banana" swages come from a professional rigger!

The new Hi-Mod fittings are easy to work with, stronger than a swage, and completely reusable and replaceable. You can take one off and inspect, then replace it. NO EXTRA parts like cones or sleeves that need to be replaced if the fitting is to be reused!

THAN, have that local rigger come out and help you dock tune the rigging, or even help with the under way rigging. BUT, make sure to ASK a lot of questions. Make it a learning experience for you so next time you will not need him.

You can see my short (14 min.) Youtube video of my last rerig at;

**** NOTE: this video is in 3D, but you can turn that off by going to the bottom and clicking on the gear icon and then selecting 3D off.

Greg
 

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Greg,
I found your video while searching for 'how-tos' on Hayn Himod rigging and it was what convinced me to do it myself. Great job.
GLAD I HELPED!!!

I think the more you can do for yourself, the better sailor/cruiser you will be.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all of the replies. Here is the current status.
Boat yard crane dropped the mast yesterday. I removed the rigging and took it to a local rigger. They estimate new rigging will be available in a couple of days. I disassembled the mast head and pulled the sheaves. Of the four sheaves two are in good shape. I could not find replacement sheaves so I found a machinist that will fabricate two replacements as well as provide new bushings and pins.I inspected the chainplates and completed the minimal maintenance indicated and cleaned and tinned the connector for the electrical on the boat side. The plan is to replace the wiring lights and antennae tomorrow and reassemble the mast head and rigging as they are available. If all goes smooth I hope to have the mast stepped on Friday afternoon, mount the boom and mainsail and adjust tension on Saturday and sail on Sunday. I will repost once all is complete.
 

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You are in San Diego. There are several rigging shops there, and you could probably find one that you could coordinate the timing with your mast removal/yard time. You don't have to do it by mail. I do almost all the various mechanical jobs on my boat (and my vehicles) myself, but there are some things I leave to the professionals. Rigging is one. I have used a local rigger (Newport Beach) whose prices were less than do-it-yourself ideas, the jobs were done very fast, and above all, it was done right. Check around your area, and go talk to some in person.
Do you mind if I ask who your rigger is in newport beach? I'm looking for a good, fair priced rigger in the area.
 

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Do you mind if I ask who your rigger is in newport beach? I'm looking for a good, fair priced rigger in the area.
If I was on the boat or had any kind of memory I'd let you know who I used to make up my staysail stay. I got one end swaged, attached that to the mast tang, cut the wire to length then used a Norseman fitting on the deck tang. Really easy, and reasonable.

Anywho it's probably one of these guys;

SoCalSail buyer's guide: Masts and Rigging: Rigging & Swaging

Good luck,

goat
 

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West Marine can provide all the rigging you need. Ask them for the Rigging Sheet for sizing, or just drop off the old rigging at any store and they will make it to size.
 
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