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Hi there sailing enthusiasts!
I am looking for a boat, preferably a steel construction, that may take me safely and comfortably to any corner of our big world. I would now like to ask you; what are some nice, good quality steel boats you know? In the 40' range, and would love a ketch! This is, though, not a demand. Of course, the Joshua, but there must be others that are similar? And if there are aluminium boats that you think of, I would love to hear about them too!
 

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What is your budget and which coast are you on? And are you familiar with steel boat maintenance? One season of neglect can seriously deteriorate steel boat condition.
There are several Bruce Roberts boats that size that are somewhat common among steel boats.
 

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The Nordic countries have a particular fondness for steel hulls, so take a look at pretty much anything coming out of Scandinavia and its environs. Personally you couldn't give me a steel hull, I don't want the maintenance headache.

Maybe, just maybe if I were headed somewhere with ice flows, but even then I wouldn't prefer aluminium.
 

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Maybe, just maybe if I were headed somewhere with ice flows, but even then I wouldn't prefer aluminium.
Blah, not me, I hate aluminum boats in ice. I know a lot of passage making expedition boats are aluminum for speed, but I have found aluminum boats in any kind of hard ice are brutal. The lack of ductility always seems to lead to bone rattling, noisy rides and lots of damage. Better than fibreglass, but for serious ice work, give me steel.

OP: Most steel sailboats I've encountered have been custom jobs, or even home built. I think personal preference plays a huge factor in this sort of thing. If I was looking for a used steel boat, I'm not sure I'd look for any particular brand names, I would assess each boat individually based on their individual merits and features.
 

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Tough and slow. Good for ice. There is a good youtube video on a couple that are able to do most of their own steel hull mtce. work. Seems that sailors are some pretty handy folks. At least the ones who make youtube videos.

Considered a thread asking who your favorite youtube boat/sailor is. The Velos crew has a good gig going. He picks up girls at various ports and debarks them before they get "too confident". Seems like a smart guy.

There is the Norwegian viking named Eric Aanderaa or something. Pretty amazing guy, he does everything himself including flying his expensive drone off the boat in the North Sea in winter. The drone is not waterproof. That is confidence. Hope I never hear about the North Sea prevailing....one very tough area.
 

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There's one newly for sale on Cruisers Forum;
Can't post links yet. It's a 40 ft Langedrag steel sloop 1989 45k
Pat
 

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Would you mind sharing why you have an affinity for a steel boat. They can be hearty for sure, but also highly exposed to oxidation and galvanic corrosion. You need access to examine every square inch, inside and out, routinely. Many boats have inaccessible areas behind cabinetry. I'm not sure if steal boats consider this.

You may find that fiberglass is much stronger than one imagines. On Yachting World's Crash Boat youtube series, they struggled to put a hole in it, so they could test patching methods. Personally, if I was concerned with structural integrity (it's far down my list of worries), I would search boats with water tight bulkheads first. The only exception may be the very high latitudes, but they aren't even on my bucket list.
 

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Jongert (Home) probably builds the oldest and most successful line of steel boats. I saw a 120 footer a few weeks back at the White Island anchorage that I'd take around the Horn tomorrow! Of course, someone else could take one of their smaller ones around, but I'm old and like my comforts at sea, even when the wind is gale force or higher.
I don't really think the offset in maintenance between a reasonably priced steel cruising boat of some years and a well built glass one of equal age is worth it unless you are a professional welder and would rather spend your time maintaining the steel than sailing.
Don't get me wrong, I love steelies. Professionally I've operated a ton of steel tugs, freighters, tour vessels and yachts, yet I bought a glass boat to retire and cruise on because I'd rather sail than maintain the steel.
If you are thinking that steel is unsinkable, please remember the Titanic.
 

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Just as well that Brent and Smack don't screw up the thread. The OP got an answer and pointed toward Origami, if they're interested. No need for 100 pissing posts. Again.
 

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True. Although I must admit that even when the thread was in the depths of the mud, I learned a lot about steel boats, backyard builds and yacht design.
 

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OK I'm not a steel boat fan......However a boat that I see most everywhere is here:

Van de Stadt Design - Van de Stadt 34

For the intrepid cruiser on smaller budget this could be the boat for you. Enough of them around for the the savvy buyer to pick up a steal....
 
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