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Shut up and go already! (Hoping that's the motivation you seek)
:)

You've already put more thought into this than many people who have done what you want to do and lived through it.
 

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I always like to think of the edge of my deck as representing the top of a 1,000 foot precipice, and my lifelines as being charged with 600V of electricity. I figure such a mindset is my best shot at staying aboard, so Thanks, but no thanks, I don't think I'll try stepping overboard anytime soon some night offshore, hoping some New Age Santa Claus or Tooth Fairy is gonna catch me before I make a splash...

What about those who ran out of money but chose to continue on?
Damn, I'd love to how one manages to do that :) All the 'cruisers' I've seen that were broke, weren't going anywhere...

I recently posted a thread titled voyaging on $500.00 a month. I was looking for like minded voyagers who chose a slightly riskier approach to voyaging rather than let fear of the unknown keep them changed to the dock. It has been a fun thread but overwhelmed with people pushing their fears on the few of us willing ready and able to make an honest attempt at being self sufficient, working when we need to and going with less from time to time but still cutting the dock lines.
You know, as far as I can tell, you haven't gone much of anywhere under sail, so far... So, I'd suggest you lighten up a bit on some of your judgments about what might be keeping others "chained to their docks"... I don't see anyone "pushing their fears" in this thread. Many of us might simply have no desire to cruise on a 22' boat, and going without an engine is not an option for myself, and many others. If that works for you, great... however, your insinuation that your particular choices make you somehow more "self-sufficient" than anyone else here seems pretty damn smug...

I see others in this thread dealing with the REALITY of their lives and responsibilities, and adding up REAL numbers that apply to them... Not everyone posting here, instead of being out there, is doing so because they are AFRAID of taking off... Living aboard and voyaging full-time is not necessarily the be-all and end-all for everyone posting to this thread, nor do most of us likely embrace the delusional notion that if we step off a cliff, some safety net will be magically cast to arrest our fall...
 

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I don't think I've ever met anyone actually cruising who was 100% done with every project that needed doing, before they left. We sail every day with a list of things that need doing.
But, as for a net appearing; it's not too likely, so one should make certain that the jobs that aren't done are not critical to the voyage planned.
The only people I've ever met whose boats are perfect, are those who have them professionally maintained and use their boats very, very little.
"Damn, I'd love to how one manages to do that :) All the 'cruisers' I've seen that were broke, weren't going anywhere..." Amen to that, Jon.
 

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Boys and boys... I've removed a few posts above, let's not let this devolve into a name-calling slugfest.

Barefoot.. let's keep this civil.
 

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Been there, done that, don't have to anymore, don't want to anymore, but you go and have fun. I'll be in the best restaurant in the harbor, check please, peace out.
 

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"Step off the cliff and a net will appear"

Only if you are incredibly lucky.

It seems that for you leaving the dock and sail away is your ultimate goal even if you have to do it on a 22ft boat without engine, no insurance, no health care plan and probably not enough money to keep cruising.

That's OK, for me and it seems for all here and maybe that net will appear when you need it, maybe not.

You seem to consider that your objective is the prime objective of all that sail and like sailing or cruising, I mean to live in a boat and sail away and that the only reason that all the others don't do it's because they are afraid or have not the conditions to do it.

I would say that for many the more important thing in life is to have a family, to have and raise kids, to fit in society in a useful and contributory way....and to sail. Many of us could live full time in a boat if we wanted to. We chose not to because that's not what we want, not because we are afraid.

That does not mean that we like less to sail or to cruise than you, just that we like it in a different way and are not interested in the life style you seem to have chosen.
 

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Dude - I've been reading your blog for a long time now - at least a year. Maybe it is time for you to go back and re-read what you have written. The majority of it is how "back in the day" you were a big financial success, knowing this person or that person. But apparently you have "dropped out" of the working class and now have to scavenge, or borrow, or have someone give you stuff in order to keep yourself going. Is that an existence? And to make yourself feel better about it you are now saying that anyone else who doesn't follow what you are doing are losers. Think about that. The folks on this board, and many others, are hard working folks who "are" living out their dreams - everyone has different dreams. It may not be your dream of sailing off into the big blue yonder, without a penny to your name, living off others...I mean the kindness of others. Most folks are self sufficient in boating because they've worked hard and earned the money to make it that way...they didn't drop out of the working class. My recommendation or advise (and you know what you can do with advise) is for you to actually get a job, like everyone else and build up that Cruise Kitty....then you'll go, be self-sufficient and not have to live off of others....I mean the kindness of others.

Also - when most folks know their limitations...as in, they know they can only afford a certain boat, etc...they enjoy that boat and have fun with it, they get off the dock and they go as far as they can. It may only be on a small lake, doesn't matter. They have what they paid for and they Make fun for themselves and others. They don't whine about what was, what could be, what is....they just go out there and do it and enjoy it. So go and have fun!!

Happy seas and fair winds to you. May it end up being everything you had wished for!!

Oh, and p.s. the only Net I ever had was the one I built...I'm just not the type to Step off a cliff and expect there to be a Net to catch me. I had my Net with me Before I stepped off the cliff. Just sayin'
 

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Read the book, No Shortcuts to the Top, by Ed Viesturs. It's one of my all time favorites.

It is not what you might think, as it has nothing to do with climbing a corporate or social ladder. Rather, as written by one of the greatest American mountain climbers of all time, its about planning for risk, but more importantly, doing what you planned. Ed postulates that most climbers that are hurt or killed, decided to press on in the moment, when at base camp they would have acknowledged they should have turned back. On Ed's first summit attempt on Everest, he turned back within 300 meters from the summit. He spent two months on the mountain and could literally see the goal line. But he reached the time he needed to turn back to do so safely. Many would have pressed on the next hour and risked a descent in the dark.

The point is, he rejects the idea of a net just appearing. You make your own fate and must have discipline to survive over the long haul. Anyone can get lucky once.

It really is a great read, as it contains a interesting story of his climbing evolution. I don't think one needs to have interest in mountaineering to like it, or more importantly, to really get a great perspective from it. For those less familiar, Ed has climbed every single 8k meter Himalayan mountain, without supplemental oxygen. I've lost track of the number of Everest summits he has... something in the order of a dozen.
 
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Damn! Looks like some good stuff got deleted . . ...

I have to say I am not fan of the crowd that approaches the budgetary issues by answering the question "how do you only spend X" (the magic number) and they say "well you by a sack of potatoes every time you enter an odd numbered nation and make sure you always trail your hook from the starboard side of the boat" . . . numbers are numbers and money is money. Math is good and can answer many questions.

On the other hand, the "net" might be a bit metaphorical, ya know guys? Part of the metaphor might be that you can't let your decisions be dictated by fear *or* (for those of us who have lived mostly conventional 1st World Western lives) by expectation that life on a boat will or should be driven by the same realities as workaday life a shore. If you ever had a chance to live even a little outside of the mainstream, you know that the generosity of strangers and fellow travelers is frequently beyond all possible expectation, and that there are opportunities and resources that you only begin to perceive when you get away from the notion of "what do I need to spend to get / do X" (be it on a sailboat or on land). To me, those nebulous qualities of life outside the mainstream are some of life's most precious experiences. So, I think BFN and Christian (to the extent he adopts bfn's arguments) deserve not only some slack for the metaphor (yeah we can all make fun of the guy whose net doesn't appear) but also some thanks for the topic even if it is one which is unlikely to survive the slash and burn nature of forum discourse.

The two real problems I see with this thread are: First a more proper metaphor might have been: do your best and a net may appear when you haven't done enough (pretty much John Vigor's black box or the approach Capta describes to preparation . . . Smacky that's for you and your ISAF regs -). While the net may be a metaphor, the cliff holds some real direct correlations to sailing and I wouldn't want to be stuck waiting for my metaphor to show up. The second problem I see is that just like the "big boat / have all the money" sailors often have little clue what life outside their financial cocoon is like (regardless of how remote an island they have sailed to or how dirty a sailor's bar they have entered); the go small go now crowd might recognize (or come to recognize) the opportunity and beauty of life outside the mainstream (call it the fringe or a more essential life or whatever) but they often couple their love of that lifestyle with some really harsh criticisms of (and crazy political ideas about) those they don't identify with. The result is that it is almost impossible for them to talk to each other (even though both could probably use a bit of what the other knows).

Anyway, that's my take on life an cliffs this rainy morning!
 

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I've helped clean up several climbers for whom a net did not magically appear.

Scale the cliff, by all means. But provide for your own own safety By that I mean both physical and financial/emotional, since it might be inferred those are part of this thread.
 

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I prefer Ray Bradbury's version of the "cliff" meme:

You’ve got to jump off cliffs all the time and build your wings on the way down.”
 
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