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In our sailing class last year, the instructor briefly touched on the subject of bringing the boat to a stop in the shortest possible time. But neither my wife nor I can remember what he said the maneuver was!

Would it simply be heaving to?
 

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In our sailing class last year, the instructor briefly touched on the subject of bringing the boat to a stop in the shortest possible time. But neither my wife nor I can remember what he said the maneuver was!

Would it simply be heaving to?
How to stop a boat in the shortest possible time?...
I think running aground would do it.
Or hitting a reef, or running into the dock. Having your son accidentally drop anchor would do it, or letting go of the boom and knocking your wife overboard. I'm sure there are probably a few slick ******* maneuvers too.
But I don't think any of my suggested maneuvers would help you'd pass the class, nor would they be very good for your boat! ;)
 

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Hmmm????? "Quick Stop" fer me was getting the rudder snagged onna racing bouy line! ;) Guess an anchor off the stern would do 'bout the same. Possibly fire the iron genny and put it in "R" right smartly would do it too..;)

I'da liked ta see that vid; but my phone's browser is incompatableI could always use some tips on coming to a halt. Perhaps a quick pointer on the diff w/a heave-to?
 

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Barquito
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If I wanted to stop, I would just head into the wind. Aproaching a dock you could also add some quick large movements of the tiller side-to-side, or if you are on a small enough boat, or have burly enough crew, you can push the boom out into the wind. In the open water, heave-to, or sometimes called the safety position.
 

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Maybe this will work better for you, there's a written description, but if you can enlarge the diagrams they are pretty clear. Quick turn method from a reach is shown then the Quick stop from close hauled.
MOB Man Over Board US Sailing Couse and Sailing School
I like to do the pick up while hove-to. When done from close haul / close reach, you do not touch the sails. Easily done by one person.

 
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Barquito
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jackdale - I'm going a little off topic here, but, have you had any trouble doing this in high winds? I would think having the sails trimmed in for a close haul coarse would knock you down pretty good while broadside to the wind.
 

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jackdale - I'm going a little off topic here, but, have you had any trouble doing this in high winds? I would think having the sails trimmed in for a close haul coarse would knock you down pretty good while broadside to the wind.
I have done the maneuver in up to 25 knot winds.

The fact that you are heeled over is actually advantageous as it puts you closer to the MOB.

These are some of the advantages of the method. This was part of a discussion within CYA.

a) It can be done easily by one person.
b) There is usually no need to adjust sails.
c) The sails are always under control. There are no flying clews or sheets.
d) The MOB is always on the same side of the vessel and kept in sight.
e) If unsuccessful, just come around again.
f) The MOB can be reached on most vessels by lying on the deck and grabbing them. I retrieved a TV antenna off Cape Scott in this manner.)
g) Works exceptionally well with a life-sling.

Is is actually similar to a quick stop, but the jib is not furled.

In some trials in San Francisco, they found that when stopping with the MOB to windward, the boat made more leeway that the MOB.
 

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In our sailing class last year, the instructor briefly touched on the subject of bringing the boat to a stop in the shortest possible time. But neither my wife nor I can remember what he said the maneuver was!

Would it simply be heaving to?
Heaving to is a process for stopping the boat...but not the quickest. The quickest maneuver is rapid port-starboard full movement of the rudder, naturally combined with luffing the sails. On a boat like a Colgate 26, which has a rudder which can be turned 360 degrees, a couple of repeated 90 degree swings stops the boat almost immediately.
 

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Thanks Jackdale, Much better diagram, I'm also more familiar with being hove to while picking up as opposed to luffing up as shown on the US Sailing site. I've recovered more hats, gloves, camera bags and fenders than people, keep hoping for the bag of money that fell off a southbound panga.:D
 

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Heaving to is a process for stopping the boat...but not the quickest. The quickest maneuver is rapid port-starboard full movement of the rudder, naturally combined with luffing the sails. On a boat like a Colgate 26, which has a rudder which can be turned 360 degrees, a couple of repeated 90 degree swings stops the boat almost immediately.
Ha! None of that would work on my boat.. it'd just ignore your rudder and sail movements and keep going. :)

Heave-to seems to be something that works on ALL boats (not just pocket racers) from Tall Ships downwards perhaps why it is taught to be the quickest.
 

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I've never seen Heave-To taught as the quickest way to stop a boat. I teach at a lot nonprofit and we teach it as the best way to stop the boat for a long period of time. That is also how I use it, we go hove-to if we want a lunch break, need to reef the main, or otherwise need a break.

Where I teach we use safety position (come up beyond close hauled, release sails) as a quick way to stop the boat, but not a way to stop it on a dime. We teach rudder braking/tight turns as a quick way to slow down the boat (especially while docking).

We've moved away from the Quick Stop/Jybe Around style of MOB to Figure-8. It is safer not to jybe in the conditions where you might have lost someone overboard. I'll have to try jackdale's version where you leave the sails tightly trimmed on a few boats and see how it works for me.
 

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We've found the Quickstop method to work fastest, though you do need the room to do the maneuver. Whatever point of sail you're on, tack and circle 'round. We've done this with the spinnaker up in 15 knots of wind, as well as with other sail/wind combinations. It puts the boat pretty much back where you were, ready to do something else. What you do after that - luffing, heaving to, dropping sails, picking up a MOB or a mooring, is up to you.
 

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Has anyone tried heaving-to with a self-tacking jib? Some monohulls (Hanse) and many multihulls have self-tacking jibs.
 

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Has anyone tried heaving-to with a self-tacking jib? Some monohulls (Hanse) and many multihulls have self-tacking jibs.
Yes, you need to prepare first, in Scandinavia you will find that self-tacking jib is used on more boats than just Hanse.

I have permanently rigged barber/inner/outer haulers on my self-tacking jib.
The way mine are rigged they have several uses.
  • Adjust the slot while sailing upwind
  • I can open up and while going downwind
  • It will prevent the jib from auto gybing when going DDW in lumpy sea
  • It is an easy way to backwind the sail

Some pictures
The barber hauler is attached to the ring around the 1:2 sheet, this way I have he pull going parallel to the track even with a partly furled sail.


The jib pulled closer to the center line.


I have installed pad eyes at the toerail for the low friction rings.
 
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