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We recently purchased a 32 Catalina - She'll be stored on the hard in Florida for 11 months (until November 2015). So far, we have arranged to keep her at an inland marina (25 miles up Okeechobee River/Canal). They provide boat stands and two hurricane tie downs.

We are planning to put all bedding, linens, towels, fabric stuff in vacuum storage bags; remove all food stocks; additive in the diesel fuel; drain water tanks.

What else can we do to prevent mold/water/heat damage upon our return?

Tarp or not? Leave a hatch or port partially open?

thx,
 

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As many solar-powered fans as you can find holes for -- the more airflow the better. Passive won't cut it in summer, forced-draft for the win.
 

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BUY SOME GALVANIZED OR NON FERROUS METAL GAUZE. BLOCK EVERY HOLE,

Gotta keep those mud wasps out.

Create a drain in the bilge by removing a plug or even the whole seacock. [ Gauze!] You don't want the boat to fill with water.
 

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Disconnect the lowest seacock hose, stuff the opening with brass scrubbing sponge to keep the critters out, and put in as many solar powered fans as the boat can handle. Even when it's very humid and raining, these fans do an outstanding job of mildew prevention. I use 72mm computer fans for venting, very low power consumption, very high performance and easily mounted with a couple wood screws.

I do not recommend using the WM fans that folks install for the head - just not enough air movement, but better than nothing.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the comments so far.

We'll be using the Indiantown Marina, btw.

Looks like it will be important to install a couple of solar vents. In order for them to work, no tarp (it sounds like).

great idea to provide some drainage from inside, just in case the water gets in, let's give it a way to get out. GREAT idea!!!

thank you everyone for your thoughts.

~markb
 

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bratzcpa, we plan on doing the same thing but at Glades Storage. I am considering options as well and have included an ozone generator on my list. We have used one in the home for some 30 years and have very good things to report about it. It is a much lower power consumer than a dehumidifier and could be run off solar.

Last time we were at Indiantown, they didn't have power in the storage area. Glades can provide some power but it is $50/mo.

In my mind (as dictated by my budget), this pretty much limits me to a solar and/or wind power supply, and a low power consumption fan and/or ozone solution.

I am also looking at mechanical wind driven ventilators like you see on roof tops. A wind-driven system isn't a stand-alone solution in Florida; as there are many hot, humid days with very little wind, but it would help.

The need to evacuate rainwater is very important unless you are absolutely convinced your boat doesn't leak at all. I've seen several boats "sink" while in dry storage. My plan is to generate enough solar power to run the bilge pump occasionally if needed.
 

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You can still place a poly tarp over the boom, which will help keep a lot of water and other airborne debris out of the cockpit. That tarp will not create problems with ventilation, but be sure you do not shade your solar panel with it.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Ozone destroys rubber, iirc. Be careful on a boat.

We store with kanberra gel aboard. Lots of it. Needs replacing every 2-4 months.

Plenty of damp rid containers too, but a powered dehumidifier is best.

Good to start as clean as possible.

In such a humid environment for the summer, you'll need ventilation.

25 miles inland is better than near shore in hurricane season, but I would go to Georgia, if it was an option.
 

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You can still place a poly tarp over the boom, which will help keep a lot of water and other airborne debris out of the cockpit. That tarp will not create problems with ventilation, but be sure you do not shade your solar panel with it.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
Yes, leaves are notorious for blocking scuppers which allows water to build up on deck and in the cockpit sole. A tarp is a good idea if it can be kept from blocking ventilation. If I am anywhere near trees, I put a tarp over the boom and the trickle charge panels out further forward on deck where they get sun.
 

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smurphny, does the smell of the mold packs dissipate quickly after opening the boat? I also like leaving a tarp above the cockpit and roof. Due to frequent very high winds from
Florida's summer thunderstorms, I have seen a lot of them get shredded. I think the key is to use very heavy duty tarps stretched tightly so they don't flutter.

Minnewaska, we have used ozone on the boat and at home for mold/mildew control for over 30 years with good results, and haven't experienced rubber destruction. Under what conditions did you experience this?
 

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smurphny, does the smell of the mold packs dissipate quickly after opening the boat? I also like leaving a tarp above the cockpit and roof. Due to frequent very high winds from
Florida's summer thunderstorms, I have seen a lot of them get shredded. I think the key is to use very heavy duty tarps stretched tightly so they don't flutter.

Minnewaska, we have used ozone on the boat and at home for mold/mildew control for over 30 years with good results, and haven't experienced rubber destruction. Under what conditions did you experience this?
Yes, it is a moderately strong odor and I would not want to inhale it for long but it does dissipate almost immediately with a good airing out. It also does not seem to make cushions or porous materials retain a smell. I use double the recommended amount for the cubic feet involved and also keep some in less ventilated containers to lengthen the effective time it will work. I just tape over some of the vent holes in some of the plastic containers which came from another similar product. I have noticed a film on higher fiberglass surfaces which I'm assuming comes from this chemical but it does not seem to do any harm and wipes off easily. I also give my wood surfaces a wipedown with white vinegar regularly which works to keep mildew from forming.
 

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.....Minnewaska, we have used ozone on the boat and at home for mold/mildew control for over 30 years with good results, and haven't experienced rubber destruction. Under what conditions did you experience this?
I've not used ozone, but I just hit the google button to confirm my recollection. There is ample study that it is harmful to rubber. Starts with exterior cracking apparently. Could be where you can't see it well.
 

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smurphny, thanks for the lead on the mold packs. Their information indicates that it controls mold growth by depleting oxygen in the air. Sounds like it would work best on a boat that is sealed up so little new oxygen is introduced. I think I will give it a try.
 
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