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I am debating between several options in terms of cookers for my contest 30 mk1. It must be gimbaled because i am planning to cruise extensively and in conditions that may sometimes be too rouge for me to really be able to cook on a non gimbaled stove. i have a coleman camping stove one of the dual fuel ones, and i have a forespar mini galley. i like that the mini galley has a fully gimbaled potholder i.e it is gimbaled in all directions as opposed to most stoves which only compensate for the yawing of a boat. My question is, the forespar mini galley uses litle propane tanks and i really don't like propane, could i take the burner part of of it and attach it to my Coleman camping stove which i believe can be made to burn kerosene, or simple gasoline, or should i buy an alcohol stove, and build a gimbaled mount for it, i have seen this done on an ericson 27. Another alternative i suppose would be if i could convert the mini galley to burn something other than propane. I just dont like the idea of propane on my boat.
 

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If you're scared of propane (but you're willing to convert to GASOLINE:eek:??????) then I'd recommend the Origo style wick alcohol type stoves.. they are available in gimballed versions.However propane is a pretty manageable and compact fuel if used appropriately.

http://www.dometic.com/d23b666d-f37b-47f8-9cdd-c9ae628dee8e.fodoc

btw most stoves gimbal to accommodate the heeling angle, not the 'yawing' of a boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I suppose gasoline isn't a good option but i have read that those stoves can be converted to burn kerosene which i have read is the least volatile fuel. If i were to stay with propane it would require me to build a draining fuel locker however and that is a lot of money and work i could save by converting to alcohol. I will check out the origo wick style they look like a good compromise. I had a butane stove once as well but i was similarly concerned about blowing my boat up and threw it out.
 

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I am debating between several options in terms of cookers for my contest 30 mk1.
Hi duchess

You have to do your homework on how the different stove fuels work and how efficient they are, then decide which one to have. I don’t remember seeing a stove that burns gasoline or anyone insane enough to want it.
Alcohol is ok for weekends but it does not have the BTUs for everyday cooking and is only available in the US and Canada. You can use other fuels on the stove but you take the chance. Kerosene in my opinion is the best, having used it daily for many years with no problems whatsoever, no soot, no flare ups no dirty pots, no smell. It does not have the same BTUs as propane, and you need to prime, but you don’t need the extra monitoring necessary for a gas stove. The insurance companies like it too. However, the market dictated that propane is more convenient, because you just light it and cook, so the special kerosene burners are no longer available, at least I cannot find a source for the burners and parts anymore.
Gas has its drawbacks, but as stated above, if you take all the precautions, you should be fine.
Choose a stove that is easy to find parts and a fuel that does the job, this will be your home and you need to use the stove 3, 4 times everyday – so avoid having to start all over again when you get tired of eating cold or uncooked food.
 

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Had a guy once tell me he used kerosene in his Coleman camping stove all the time? Never tried it, can it be done, or was he just F*$#ing with me?
 

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Coleman dual-fuels I've seen are either Coleman fuel or unleaded gasoline. Never have seen a kero unit.
If that's what you've mentioned or actually seen; please fwd a link, as I'm currently seeking an alternative to propane.
 

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No one has mentioned using LNG. Lighter than air and won't settle in the bilge. I have been using for over 30 years with no issues.

Edited..ty Faster

Had to check...Tank says compressed Methane
 

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No one has mentioned using LNG. Lighter than air and won't settle in the bilge. I have been using for over 30 years with no issues.
You mean CNG?? Compressed... rather than Liquified...
 
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You mean CNG?? Compressed... rather than Liquified...
Like propane it is liquid I believe in the tank, but a gas when released. It is the only type of stove I have not used.

Duchess

First question - where will you be going? Cng is only available in some parts of North America, not in the rest of the world. Alcohol is rare in most parts of the world and very expensive if found. I have heard it said that in the Caribbean it is less expensive to use overproof rum! Alcohol is needed to prime a kerosene stove unless you use a propane torch which also works. As posted the kero burners are not produced anymore, the last ones we received were made in Portugal and very poor quality as well.

I have owned and cooked on kerosene stoves (Primus) in the 60's and early 70's, alcohol (the worst or the lot) and actually gasoline - Coleman stove used outside only in the 60's on my first small boat. For the last 25 years I have used propane and wouldn't go back to another fuel even if I was paid to.

The only reason Origo and other alcohol stoves are popular is because many are scared of propane. On a cooking basis only comparison propane would be the choice of the majority as it is with any professional cook, electric being not as good and not a choice on a small boat.

Propane is safe if used properly. All burners now have shut-offs if the flame goes out. It is one of the cleanest fuels. It doesn't smell in use nor make people nauseous as alcohol can. It is available worldwide - outside North America it is the major cooking fuel in virtually every country.

The tank can be rail mounted as many have done, which eliminates the need for a sealed locker. Propane sniffers can be purchased at a reasonable price.

I would recommend an Eno 2 burner gimbaled stove like the one shown at the bottom of the catalog pic below. It comes with pot holders and is easy to keep clean. Eno is Force 10 and they are available at any good marine store.
 

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Like choosing a boat, choosing a stove should be based on how you'll actually use it. If you're basically just heating stuff up, cooking some eggs and such, the Origo type is fine, and you can get fuel at any hardware/big box store. If you're more into "cooking", than I'd go with propane.
 

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Like choosing a boat, choosing a stove should be based on how you'll actually use it. If you're basically just heating stuff up, cooking some eggs and such, the Origo type is fine, and you can get fuel at any hardware/big box store. If you're more into "cooking", than I'd go with propane.
Agreed. I believe the Duchess wants to travel far.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi duchess

You have to do your homework on how the different stove fuels work and how efficient they are, then decide which one to have. I don’t remember seeing a stove that burns gasoline or anyone insane enough to want it.
Alcohol is ok for weekends but it does not have the BTUs for everyday cooking and is only available in the US and Canada. You can use other fuels on the stove but you take the chance. Kerosene in my opinion is the best, having used it daily for many years with no problems whatsoever, no soot, no flare ups no dirty pots, no smell. It does not have the same BTUs as propane, and you need to prime, but you don’t need the extra monitoring necessary for a gas stove. The insurance companies like it too. However, the market dictated that propane is more convenient, because you just light it and cook, so the special kerosene burners are no longer available, at least I cannot find a source for the burners and parts anymore.
Gas has its drawbacks, but as stated above, if you take all the precautions, you should be fine.
Choose a stove that is easy to find parts and a fuel that does the job, this will be your home and you need to use the stove 3, 4 times everyday – so avoid having to start all over again when you get tired of eating cold or uncooked food.
so if kerosene is best which i have also read on atom voyages website, what is a good kerosene stove and where do i get one. last summer and the summer before i survived on uncooked canned, you do what you have o but id like to be able to eat things other than canned beans, soup and corn.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Like propane it is liquid I believe in the tank, but a gas when released. It is the only type of stove I have not used.

Duchess

First question - where will you be going? Cng is only available in some parts of North America, not in the rest of the world. Alcohol is rare in most parts of the world and very expensive if found. I have heard it said that in the Caribbean it is less expensive to use overproof rum! Alcohol is needed to prime a kerosene stove unless you use a propane torch which also works. As posted the kero burners are not produced anymore, the last ones we received were made in Portugal and very poor quality as well.

I have owned and cooked on kerosene stoves (Primus) in the 60's and early 70's, alcohol (the worst or the lot) and actually gasoline - Coleman stove used outside only in the 60's on my first small boat. For the last 25 years I have used propane and wouldn't go back to another fuel even if I was paid to.

The only reason Origo and other alcohol stoves are popular is because many are scared of propane. On a cooking basis only comparison propane would be the choice of the majority as it is with any professional cook, electric being not as good and not a choice on a small boat.

Propane is safe if used properly. All burners now have shut-offs if the flame goes out. It is one of the cleanest fuels. It doesn't smell in use nor make people nauseous as alcohol can. It is available worldwide - outside North America it is the major cooking fuel in virtually every country.

The tank can be rail mounted as many have done, which eliminates the need for a sealed locker. Propane sniffers can be purchased at a reasonable price.

I would recommend an Eno 2 burner gimbaled stove like the one shown at the bottom of the catalog pic below. It comes with pot holders and is easy to keep clean. Eno is Force 10 and they are available at any good marine store.
would you suggest that stove over the propane one i have now if i were to stay with this one what i could do is either store the mini propane botles in a sealed cooler that is kept on deck lashed to something or i could convert th stove to be able to be fed by a tank on the rail. I am getting the impression that alcohol doesnt have the power i need, and you say kerosene stoves are of low quality. I am planning on crusing toronto to newfoundland this year then heading for europe via bermuda and after that i will likely head back west to the carribean via bermuda, I am probably going to then work a bit and possibly go on a full circumnavigation slowly. possibly though the first part is for sure.
 

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If you are happy with the single burner (I think) stove you have you could keep it. I would keep it as a second emergency stove and get a proper 2 burner gimbaled stove with outside tank.

You are planning a lot of travelling, so your priorities should be:

1. Availability of fuel
2. Ease of use
3. cost of fuel
4. efficiency of fuel including cleanliness and heat produced - alcohol vs propane for example

If your current stove is a one burner (not the Coleman but the Forespar) it is rather limiting. A 2 burner stove you can use when sailing (gimbaled) should be the minimum I would think. My stove is a 3 burner gimbaled with full oven with broiler - I regularly use the oven as well as 2 or 3 burners - just like at home, which is what my boat is. Camping is ok for a few days but it wears thin after a while.
 

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We have an Origo one-burner on our boat. The non-pressurized alcohol is relatively easy to find and it heats up FAST (much faster than we expected).
 

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Duchess There's currently a gimbaled kerosene stove on ebay, search for "sea swing."

I use an MSR Dragonfly backpacking stove with kerosene on my boat, and love it (although it's not gimbaled). It's far more powerful than any stove (portable or not) I've ever used, and will boil a gigantic pot of water in minutes. Sometimes I run it on regular automotive diesel fuel, which is really cheap. It can also run on gasoline or white gas if I swap out a nozzle.

I think kerosene is the way to go for stoves as it's both safer, and more energy dense (so you burn a lot less fuel). The downside is that they can be a bit smoky when first lighting them, before they warm up.
 

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We have an Origo one-burner on our boat. The non-pressurized alcohol is relatively easy to find and it heats up FAST (much faster than we expected).
Relatively easy to find in North America - but not where the Duchess will be going.
 

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Duchess There's currently a gimbaled kerosene stove on ebay, search for "sea swing."

I think kerosene is the way to go for stoves as it's both safer, and more energy dense (so you burn a lot less fuel). The downside is that they can be a bit smoky when first lighting them, before they warm up.
As far as fuel use 10 lbs of propane lasts me 6 to 8 weeks cooking aboard every day - I use the oven regularly as well.

There is no "safe fuel" really, if there was it wouldn't burn.:)

Alcohol is considered by many (including a few long term cruisers I know) as the most dangerous fuel. You often cannot see the flame. One cruiser had a flare-up with an alcohol stove and the water that was put on it just chased the flames under cabinetry - the boat was a total loss.
 
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