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I noticed initially that there was a very slight lean towards starboard after the boat was placed on the stand. I didn't make anything of it at the time. Now, maybe too much of the boat's weight was resting on the aft starboard stand pad. There is now an inward bulge in the hull.
It is not unusual with a slight lean towards any of the sides - or in other directions. I never put much attention to that, actually it is often good to have the boat to lean slightly to one side, then water will easily flow away.

Some boats are known to be somewhat soft, and need a wide support pad (my pads are in the size 1 ft x 1 ft), this is often recommended with hulls with a sandwich construction. From photo #2 is looks as your pads are of good size.

GRP is in itself quite soft. If there are no support by frames and / or stringers the material will bulge. A soft bulge is not to worry about, but do inspect carefully - look for cracks in the gelcoat. Cracks inside is not to worry about, but ouside should be handled.
- If you look around you will see that many boats actually have cracks on the outside, where owners for one ot the other reason has decided not to repair it. A solid grp hull, where the fibers have bee really saturated, there is not much to worry about.

You could take a small hammer and very lightly knock on the grp around the bulge and at the bulge. Same, "solid" sound - good. If you hear a more un-distinct sound, then there might be a weakened area. There are of course more ways of doing this, with eg ultra-sound, so you might ask a professional to have a look. But it is good to have investigated self first.

It is difficult to see how large (deep) the bulge is from the photo. A minor bulge is no real worry.

For future, it could be good to think about how / where you would like to position the supporting pads. This does take some thinking, as it is not good to have b ulges close to inner support as bulkheads - that will result in cracks and too sharp bends.

As pointed out, rust in the rudder ... not good.

/J
 

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I forgot to mention that there is a crack in the fiberglass on the inside as seen in the picture. There is some sort of structural frame (aluminum?, fiberglass?) that is now bent inwards at the bulge and the overlaying fiberglass is split apart (see picture). Suggestions for repair?
That is probably a stringer (depends on the orientation, could be a frame as well). It is not difficult to repair if you can use an angle grinder and do some grp work - it is easy, you can learn quickly if you are used to tools and some handy work.
Firstly, fix the support on the outside so the is no pressure in creating the bulge. That means you have to make another arrangement for supporting the boat on land. Be creful, so this doesn't happen again.
Then, you might have to apply some preassure from the inside to correct the bulge. Doubt this will need much force, but you must have something to see to that you get the hull back in shape.
Next step is useing the ange grinder, cut away bad parts. Before that you can make some investigations with a chiesel and hammer - do not be afraid to hack away bad patches from the stringer - what is bad should go away. The hull I would be more careful with.
The damage is only in one point, but to repair you have to cover a larger area. When cutting away in the stringer, then the should be over a distance of maybe some 3-5 dm (1 -1½ ft), and both ends should be tapered.
With the angle grinder you have to sand away the gelcoat of the hull in the area. Last stage is to rebuild the stringer, and to get it attached to the hull, all this with grp.
Here, I do not go inte the detail, just indicating the main steps. You have to get more detailed info from eg a book "how to repair fibreglass boats" or something.
To do this repair is neither difficult nor expensive. Use normal grp materials (not epoxy).

It could be good to invest in some thinking on why and what has caused this. It looks as the stringer was too weak, and wasn't fastened enough to the hull (?). Stringers are usually horisontal, and if you are unlucky then there has been water in the fold between stringer and hull. This water may have penetrated in between the stringer and the hull, and maybe frozen (?), and thus causing a separation. Pure speculation from my side.

Also, any suggestions regarding the rudder? A survey last September showed no cracks or outward sign of damage to the rudder but obviously now that its been draining (or freezing?) all winter, there is rust dripping visible. A google search showed that people drill into the rudder to drain the water then fill the holes up with filler. Should I do work to the rudder before putting her back in the water and if so, what? Thanks for all the help!
If you have got water in the rudder (so it seems) the drill a small hole (5-8 mm) at the lowest point where there is a void inside the rudder (light hammer, listen carefully, just light tapping). If water comes out ... OK, then you know that.
Do not fill with a filler! Use a maschine screw instead, which you then remove the following fall (and replace in the spriong and so on).
It is difficult to see in the photo, sometimes one does gets some rust coming out also from stainless - this is as stainless is not really stainless it is just rusting very slowly. But to get this process to slow down, the steel must be open for oxygen ... which will build up a thin layer of oxide. Without this, some rust may be produced.
In itself, som rust stains are not dangerous. They may be a sign of some serious damage inside the rudder - who knows what kind of steel was used?
I would recommend the small hammer again ... listen carefully. If it looks like it is just on the surface (where the rust origin is) the I recommend using a chiesel and removing bad parts, and then rebuild with new grp.

It is difficult to say if you have any serious damage in the rudder or not, based on one photo.

You may have a look on the survey, what did it actually say, and does it include some clauses on damages that were not really identified - a surveyor should give some kind of ensurance that he is worth his pay.

/J
 

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Does it makes sense to add a new stringer parallel and adjacent to the damaged stringer? I'm picturing a similar concept to a splint. Maybe overlap the grp over both the new stringer and the damaged one?
No, not much. It may even be counterproductive ... the hull is obviously soft, then if it is made too stiff locally it will not flex in an even way.

Just repair the old stringer, and see to that it is tapered off both in lengt and in the other dimension so stiffness comes gradually.

As said by the Vega guy ... this may be about nothing.

If you cannot do the job yourself you have to contact someone professional.

/J
 

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Did I miss what the yard has to say about the damage they caused and how they are going to repair it?
Did they?

Not so sure.
- The yard could rightly assume that the craddle was correctly dimensioned wrt pad size, and that owner does have some responsibility.
- The boat is said to lean somewhat, but does anyone know if this was there from the moment the boat was placed in the craddle?
- In any case, normally, a hull can take the load from some slight leaning. (I always lean my boat on the hard).
- the damage we have seen indicates hull is not as strong as it should have been. The stringer should not break for such a preassure.
- Did the owner say that he just furled the headsail? On the hard? Meaning mast was on, and with some extra wind load from the furled headsail.
- do we know anything about how the boat was supported (owners responsibility)?. With the mast on, with the furled headsail, and maybe not as tight supported as it should have been, then the boat could have started to rock back and forth - this is not an unlikely scenario.

The owner gives the impression to be a new boat owner, rather new to boat handling (that is OK, we have all been there). That is not the best position to start accusing the yard for neglect.

If it was me, I would have fixed the repairs myself. This as I know how to do it. For a new owner ... the best alternative may be to contact the insurance company.

/J
 

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Once your boat gets back into it's natural element (water) the hull will relax and any indentation should correct itself.
Maybe, maybe not.

If there is any repair work to be done I would do it once the boat is back in the water and had a chance to resume it's normal shape.
Well, there is this about making repairs in a dry hull, with a good and even temp. GRP works are best done on the dry, in a controlled environment, where the GRP can harden fast - as it should. GRP hardening is very dependant on temp.

After over 10 years of owning a sailboat I have had this happen several times over the winter with our cradle. It has only been a minor annoyance, at best.
Well, after about 50+ years of sailing and 40 years of boat owning .... these things are rare, and should be rare. It is far from the norm. If it happens, one should repair.
Having said that, repairs are easy done and not costly - if DIY.

Next winter haul out be sure to remove both sails from the boat and try to be there when they do.
And why not un-step the mast while on it? As the new owner of the boat you should yourself inspect the mast and all parts of the rig.

BTW: if the boat is to use the same craddle in the future, and to have mast on while on the hard, then further support is strongly recommended. Some elementary mechanics do say that support at bow and stern will minimize movements.

Oh, well ...

/J
 

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By coincidence I just found a GRP repair handbook on the net: in Sailing and Yachting Downloads Marine Engione Manuals scroll down a fair bit, and there will be a link to a handbook in pdf.
- I have not read it, do not take any responsibility and many other can probably be found on the net. This is rather established knowledge, most are probaly very similar.

Reading this doesn't mean one must have to do the work. But one gets more informed, understanding of the basics, and know what is expected to happen. It is easy to work with GRP, but maybe not comfortable.

/J

PS: Bluemoment is a nice homepage, BTW
 

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Update: Today we went down to the boat. The yard owner wasn't there but we showed the problem to the yard man and he helped us relieve the stress to that area with two additional jack stands. On Monday we're going to try to jack up enough to lower the cradle pad and tackle the repairs.http://i.imgur.com/08cBo1k.jpg
First step; looks good. Did the yard man offer any .. explanations?
Now, this pic does show that someone has put some bricks / stones under the craddle - luxary! That indicates the yard has taken some action.

Also, we worked on the rudder. We drilled a couple holes and drained a lot of water. At first it was clear and I was relieved but then it got rustier... Here's a picture of what drained out: http://i.imgur.com/dEitlLO.jpg?2 It's like a quart of water and it was still slowly draining when we left. On Monday we're going to do some major work on the rudder, and our plan is to patch it up for now and possibly buy a new rudder for next year and really do a full overhaul on this one as a winter project.
Isn't that what you would expect? First some clear liquid, followed by some not so clear liquid ... more rust particles.
Again, you "must" try to investigate the rudder. Some rust in the water from the rudder is more or less expected. As was pointed out earlier - is there any damages from freezing? What can be seen? Look, and listen.

On one hand, what you have seen now doesn't have to mean that there are any structural damages. Some discolored water, some stains on the outside - nothing.
But then, on the other hand, one should be able to rely on the rudder.

In a situation like this ... try to get some professional to have a look. A new rudder is expensive (I guess).

/J
 
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