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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! First time sailboat owner here in need of advice. Apparently there was structural hull damage that occurred during winter lay-up likely due to improper placement of stands or not enough stands. I noticed initially that there was a very slight lean towards starboard after the boat was placed on the stand. I didn't make anything of it at the time. Now, maybe too much of the boat's weight was resting on the aft starboard stand pad. There is now an inward bulge in the hull. Luckily, the inside can easily be visualized in the quarter berth. See links for full size pictures http://i.imgur.com/DKlGn6U.jpg and http://i.imgur.com/9GYUrId.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I forgot to mention that there is a crack in the fiberglass on the inside as seen in the picture. There is some sort of structural frame (aluminum?, fiberglass?) that is now bent inwards at the bulge and the overlaying fiberglass is split apart (see picture). Suggestions for repair?

Also, any suggestions regarding the rudder? A survey last September showed no cracks or outward sign of damage to the rudder but obviously now that its been draining (or freezing?) all winter, there is rust dripping visible. A google search showed that people drill into the rudder to drain the water then fill the holes up with filler. Should I do work to the rudder before putting her back in the water and if so, what? Thanks for all the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the input. The survey only stated that no cracks or damage was seen on the rudder, hammer tests were negative all around, but that moisture meter readings could not be obtained in the exterior hull or rudder because it had just been hauled out. This is what he says at the end:
I certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief:
The statements of fact contained in this report are true and correct. The analyses, opinions
and conclusions are limited by the reported assumptions and limiting conditions and they
are my personal, unbiased professional analyses, opinions and conclusions. I haveno
present or prospective interest in the vessel that is the subject of this report and I have no
personal interest or bias with respect to the parties involved. My compensation is not
contingent upon the reporting of a pre-determined value or a directionin value that favors
the cause of the client, the amount of the value estimate, the attainment of a stipulated
result or the occurrence of a subsequent event. I have made a personal inspection of the
vessel that is the subject of this report.
This reportshould be considered as an entire document. No single section is meant to be
used except as a part of the whole.
This report is submitted without prejudice and for the benefit of whom it may concern.
This report does not constitute a warranty, either expressed or implied, nor does it
warrant the future condition of the vessel. It is a statement of the condition of the vessel
at the time of survey only.
Unfortunately I don't have any better pictures of the cradle. This is the best one I have and yes, we're noobs and left the headsail furled up over winter. imgur: the simple image sharer

We were thinking that we should get her in the water to get the load off and work on her there. Would it be best to keep her out and change up the stand configuration to get off that spot? Also, in the cradle, the keel is resting at the bottom. When the boat was hauled out, we were not there and we just assumed they would know what they were doing (we certainly didn't know any better).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
civdis24
What make boat is she? Have you tried to lower the screw jack under the deflected spot and put something much larger to spread the stress? Really.. it's best to get the cradle set up now while the boat is on it. When she goes back in cradle the end of the season you will have less adjustments to make You could/should also, mark or lock the screw jacks in place and also make sure there is a reference mark on the boat you can use when she's back in the cradle again.
Welcome aboard!
Thanks! She's a 1979 O'Day 28
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Does it makes sense to add a new stringer parallel and adjacent to the damaged stringer? I'm picturing a similar concept to a splint. Maybe overlap the grp over both the new stringer and the damaged one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Did I miss what the yard has to say about the damage they caused and how they are going to repair it?
Yea... We're gonna talk to them about it on Friday. A friend of mine thinks we should file an insurance claim but we also want to tread lightly. I mean I guess it is their fault as the boat had just been surveyed and didn't have any voids or anything that could have caused that spot to be weakened. I'm not sure what I could say that they did wrong other than that the boat should have had more than the four posts of the cradle. It was also very slightly listed to the effected Side which may have changed the center of gravity enough to force the damage. Otherwise the boat appears to be resting on its keel. We were also not present during haul out... And didn't know any better at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The cradle was supplied by the yard. This place is not the most legit boatyard, after all the owners motto is "we're not good but we're cheap". So I suppose you get what you pay for. Again, we are total newbies so the yard just said yea no worries we'll take care of it so the cradle is theirs and we weren't there when it was hauled. Next year we'll be sure to learn from this experience. Also, we inquired about taking down the mast and they said that they like to keep them in now so we just went with the flow.

I wonder how we should approach them tomorrow and I'd really like to get a consensus regarding whether or not we should put her back in or repair on the hard
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Civdis,

I would approach the yard as a new boat owner and simply ask them what they think happened here; then, ask them if they can add a separate jackstand or two to either side of this cradle pad so you and they can both inspect the hull. They should certainly be willing to do that for you, at the very least. You should be able to get a feel from them as you both inspect the vessel together whether or not they are going to volunteer any responsibility or contribute to the repair.

I know you weren't there when they put you in the cradle, but did you return shortly afterward and was the boat leaning when you did?
Yea it was, ever so slightly. We noticed it but didn't figure it was a problem...
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Update: Today we went down to the boat. The yard owner wasn't there but we showed the problem to the yard man and he helped us relieve the stress to that area with two additional jack stands. On Monday we're going to try to jack up enough to lower the cradle pad and tackle the repairs.http://i.imgur.com/08cBo1k.jpg

Also, we worked on the rudder. We drilled a couple holes and drained a lot of water. At first it was clear and I was relieved but then it got rustier... Here's a picture of what drained out: http://i.imgur.com/dEitlLO.jpg?2 It's like a quart of water and it was still slowly draining when we left. On Monday we're going to do some major work on the rudder, and our plan is to patch it up for now and possibly buy a new rudder for next year and really do a full overhaul on this one as a winter project.
 
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