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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,
Does anyone have nay tips for loosening a stuck valve? Its the cockpit drain valve. Looks to be bronze. She is in a cold river now so I do not wish to try and plug it from outside. Is there any other way? Heat? also does anyone know if it can be taken apart somehow?
Any and all tips welcome!
Cheers,
David
 

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Senior Moment Member
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The nut opposite the handle comes off allowing the valve to be disassembled - out of the water.

I'd be concerned about that Christmas tree above the valve - looks like a lot of corrosion there.

Also, is that hose on the left only held on with PVC tape? :eek:
 

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I can think of several ways .Then I think of how much you have attacked my posts. Then I thought "He claims to have all the answers. Let him figure it out.?
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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:confused:How much attacking could have happened in all one of Dave Tersch's prior posts?:confused:

If it were me, I'd seal it from the outside with a toilet wax ring, and try to fix the valve... Or, more likely, haul the boat and replace the whole shebang with real through hulls.
 

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That post really makes me wonder if Brent actually reads others posts or if he's simply become a paranoiac with everyone here "attacking" him.

That looks like a "real" bronze cone valve to me - I'd pull it apart when the boat is out and inspect the cone - unless it's become wasp waisted some valve lapping compound will make it new again.
 

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Try loosening the thumbscrew and tapping it lightly with a rubber mallet or a wood block and hammer--careful not to break anything. For me, that usually breaks the seal between the rubber plug and the bronze body.
The handle turns a rubber plug that works like a ball valve, and the little thumbscrew at the other end compresses the rubber inside the bronze body, sealing it.
If no joy, you might try loosening, but not removing, the small thumbscrew, spraying some silicone into it and see if it penetrates. Since the core is rubber, I guess petroleum solvents would be a bad idea.
As has been said, you can disassemble it easily when the boat is out of the water. Smear the rubber plug with silicone grease and put it back together.
BTW, is that electrical tape on one of the Y's?
 

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Hello Sir,

You can remove the Seacock while the boat is in the water but you will not be able to insert a new one properly without the boat being hoisted out. If you simply want to remove the seacock then use a heavy hammer. Just be careful not to hit the sole or anything else you do not want to get damaged. I had to remove the water intake seacock for my diesel engine this way because it had never been changed for 30+ years apparently. Of course, do try and make sure all of the fasteners are off- sometimes a hacksaw and chisel are required for this. A seacock stuck without is easily beat out. Just make sure you have a good plug ready to go. You can expect a large volume of water the second you succeed.
Since you have to hoist the boat to install the other side of the seacock it would perhaps be better to do it now. Besides, usually you can get discounts during winter as the marinas are slow from lack of boat usage. If you wait until Spring/summer you will pay premium.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys for the replies, I should have replaced this ancient thing when I hauled out last spring! Doh!
I'll try to persuade it using the techniques mentioned, but she's good and stuck.
BTW What's meant by "wasp waisted"?
Oh and the electrical tape on that one side is pretty much cosmetic, covering what I recall to be a sweated connection...Once I can use the valve I intend to fix all that up.
Thanks again and happy sailing!
-Dave
 

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BTW What's meant by "wasp waisted"?
Perhaps this illustration will provide some inspiration toward understanding;
 

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Loosen the nut a 1/2 turn or so on the other side of the handle, then use a short piece of pipe on the handle for leverage. Make small movements back and forth increasing throw slightly each time. It may be seized, so if you don't feel movement with reasonable force (you decide), wait 'til next haulout. You might be able to do it with just the heel of your palm if you're not a sissy boy. ;^)

Good luck,

goat
 

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The attachment appears to be a 'tapered plug valve' an old fashioned, very robust, and EASILY rebuildable through hull valve, usually made of 'quality' bronze. The 'tapered plug' portion should be 'greased' yearly (with WATERPROOF silicone grease) or these valves will usually seize.

To 'release' and if the plug, etc. are not severely pitted ....
1. loosen the large NUT on the 'small side' of the plug.
2. use a block of hard wood against the nut 'screwed back' to be 'level' with the end of the threads
3. put a MASS of heavy weight against body of the valve on the side of plug which is larger .... 8lb. head from a sledge hammer, large 'masonry hammer' etc. This to 'resist' any 'motion' of valve when you do #4
4. Take a medium weight hammer, and sharply 'strike' the wood held over the threads (protected by the loosened nut) while holding the mass from the 'other side' of the valve. 99% of the time a sharp 'rap' with a hammer will 'spring' the plug loose.
4a. If the surfaces of the either the plug or the 'barrel' are severely corroded pitted, the valve will now leak/drip.
5. DO NOT put a lot of pressure on that HANDLE, as you will risk breaking it off .... use the hammer on small end of the 'plug'.
6. Once the plug is loose, look for a large cap screw on the side of the body of the valve. Thats where you can add a bit of waterproof grease until you later do a complete maintenance/repair/rebuild job when you haul the boat. The 'grease' is what makes the 'precise' seal to keep the water inside the valve.
7. Don't remove the plug from the barrel while the boat is in the water ..... or 'in come de ocean'.

To repair/rebuild:
1. Remove the plug from the valve. (boat on the hard).
2. Go to an automotive supply store that caters to 'auto-mechanics'
3. Purchase a small quantity of COARSE valve grinding compound and a small quantity of FINE valve grinding compound.
4. Make a water/grinding 'slurry' and apply to the internal mating surfaces.
5. Rotate the plug with compound applied until the inner surfaces are clean, bright, and without pits and other surface defects.
6. Apply waterproof silicone grease to the plug, insert it and rotate it to insure even distribution of the 'grease'
7. Replace the 'nut', but with 'just enough' tightening so that the plug 'easily' turns and all leakage stops. Come back in several days and retighten but not too much 'strain' or you'll seize the valve (but a sharp whack with a hammer will free it ... but it will need 're-greasing').

Note - when first inspecting or during 'grinding' or other repair - if you denote any 'red' / reddish color to the valve in any place, it means that bronze has had its wee bit zinc used up (as an anode) and the valve has been weakened metallurgically and SHOULD be condemned. An american made bronze valve during that era had very little zinc; asian made bronze (even today) will have relatively high amount of zinc (for 'easy machinability') and this zinc content is easily extracted by 'electrolysis'.

hope this helps.
 

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BTW What's meant by "wasp waisted"?
When the center of the cone - where the opening/closing is controlled - gets corroded it can get worn down to the point where it won't seal even in the closed position - the image in post 10 shows the shape.
 

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I can think of several ways .Then I think of how much you have attacked my posts. Then I thought "He claims to have all the answers. Let him figure it out.?
Well considering his only two posts are right here in this thread, I think you may have gone off the deep end.
 

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If boat out of water have had luck just taking off hose. Flushing junk out of inside and cleaning best I could then pouring in WD, liquid wrench or like product. Come back and light tap handle back and forth now and again. In a week or two able to dissemble using no force. Then lightly compound as outlined. Grease and re assemble. If not sure about it. Hose clamp short bit of hose and fill with colored water. Plug outside with paper towel. Wait a week. If any thing comes out replace the sucker.
 

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I wouldn't screw with this until it's out of the water! it's the cockpit drain and it's not leaking. Do it once, when you can do it right, as per Rich's post.

Break something, while you're in the water and then you've created an emergency. my 2 cents.
 

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One more vote for do it on the hard.
 

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Despite the naysayers, it can easily be replaced while in the water. I did the exact thing two months ago with my cockpit drain valve. On mine, the handle literally had broken off, stuck open. I too thought it had to be pulled out, but a buddy told me it was easy to do in the slip - he had replaced his while on a passage to the Cook Islands last year.

The process was pretty simple - get the new valve prepped and ready to go and lay it right next to the through hull, disconnect the hose at the top clamp (where it is above the waterline), start unscrewing the valve. When the valve finally unscrews, put the palm of your hand over the through hull to stop water - you will maybe get 1/2 cup of water in your bilge, and no, there is not much pressure to the water coming out, you can easily put your hand on it. Grab the new valve, remove your hand and quickly put the other valve on and start screwing it in.

This worked great for me and I was amazed at how easy it was - got maybe 1/2 cup of water in the bilge throughout the whole procedure. I did have wooden plugs laid out, at the ready in case something would go wrong. I suppose if you think the old valve is worth rebuilding, you could simply buy a screw-on cap instead of a new valve, and cap it while you rebuild the valve, and then reinstall the valve using the same procedure.

I was glad to have learned this procedure.
 
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