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I would measure the OD of the shaft log as carefully as possible. Based on your comments that your measurement of the stuffing box didn't include the barbs, it could be a 2 inch hose will work.

I understand those that like the PSS glands. I am not in that group however. I don't like the possibility (even if it's remote) that if it starts leaking in the middle of the season I have to haul the boat. A standard gland can be worked on with the boat in the water. And I really don't mind making occasional adjustments and the periodic repacking. KISS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Jim, that's my current plan. I'm going to swing past the boat early Friday morning to take the measurement, then head to a local prop shop to get the shaft and coupling fit and faced. I'll also probably have the shaft trued while I'm there. I'll see what they have in the way of hose that might work. Then I'll head back and start the install.
 

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I'm a big fan of the PSS shaft seal, but will offer more info for future consideration. They recommend replacement every 5 yrs. The cost difference between the entire unit and only the wearables isn't that great and many just do the whole thing. I still say they are worth it, but more to consider in the budget. The standard stuffing box should have this mystery hose replaced too, so you should buy a few extra lengths, just in case.

p.s. the right size hose is really necessary. While I appreciate some suggesting you try, a reinforced hose just doesn't stretch. That's essentially the reason they reinforce them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I took the day off and visited Dragon Wing today. I cleaned the shaft log and used calipers to measure it. The OD is 2". I used the calipers to measure the stuffing box the yesterday morning (rather than just using the tape measure across the widest part of the mouth), too - it's 2", not 1 7/8". That made me feel better, because I couldn't get any 1 7/8" hose that was more than 2 ply. I called a local dealer of Buck Algonquin hose, and they ordered some 2" ID for me. They said that their orders typically arrive next day, but they are only open M-F, so I took off today to get the hose. I also took the prop shaft and coupling/flange to the prop shop.

Have I mentioned that I don't really have the best of luck?

The owner of the prop shop is the only one who can run the lathe that is used to true the shaft and to do the fitting and facing. He had a doctor's appointment this morning, and the staff said they weren't sure if he was coming back today. Normally, it's the kind of thing they can do same-day, while you wait. But not today.

Since I was there and was waiting for the stuffing box hose, I knocked out a few small projects at the boat. I called the vendor at 1:30 PM to see if the package arrived. They had trouble finding the box, but eventually they did. When they opened it, the hose clamps I ordered were in there, but not the hose.

At this rate, I could have dropped the prop shaft off tomorrow (Saturday) and I could have ordered the stupid hose online, thus avoiding wasting a vacation day. 'Twas not a good day.
 

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That's a standard boat day. One step forward, one step back. Somehow, I still get where I am going. No one knows how. That 2" hose identification was a plus.

I just installed my entire dodger, bimini and side curtains in the dark. It is going to rain tonight. Can't wait to see what I did wrong in the morning.
 

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I took the day off and visited Dragon Wing today. I cleaned the shaft log and used calipers to measure it. The OD is 2". I used the calipers to measure the stuffing box the yesterday morning (rather than just using the tape measure across the widest part of the mouth), too - it's 2", not 1 7/8". That made me feel better, because I couldn't get any 1 7/8" hose that was more than 2 ply. I called a local dealer of Buck Algonquin hose, and they ordered some 2" ID for me. They said that their orders typically arrive next day, but they are only open M-F, so I took off today to get the hose. I also took the prop shaft and coupling/flange to the prop shop.

Have I mentioned that I don't really have the best of luck?

The owner of the prop shop is the only one who can run the lathe that is used to true the shaft and to do the fitting and facing. He had a doctor's appointment this morning, and the staff said they weren't sure if he was coming back today. Normally, it's the kind of thing they can do same-day, while you wait. But not today.

Since I was there and was waiting for the stuffing box hose, I knocked out a few small projects at the boat. I called the vendor at 1:30 PM to see if the package arrived. They had trouble finding the box, but eventually they did. When they opened it, the hose clamps I ordered were in there, but not the hose.

At this rate, I could have dropped the prop shaft off tomorrow (Saturday) and I could have ordered the stupid hose online, thus avoiding wasting a vacation day. 'Twas not a good day.
I don't know if this will make you feel better, but I hope so. Yesterday one of the fittings on our fresh water pressure system manifold developed a leak. With the closest Home Depot 300 miles to the north west and since we're headed south, we tried a couple of o-rings with no success. Silicone sealant is holding for now, but being on a French island there is no chance for a fitting with US threads here. Next possible island which might, just might, have something which will do, is St. Lucia, but being a British island I'm not at all convinced their hardware stores will carry US threaded fittings. So, at my best estimate, it will be about 2 months before I can get a $3.00 part on the boat, never mind the $25.00 shipping on that $3 part. So, a week end to wait isn't really all that bad. :) Ain't yachting fun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Capta, thanks. I'm not sure that it makes me feel better, but it does put my problem into perspective. :) I hope you guys are enjoying your honeymoon! FWIW, I have some "RTV silicone gasket sealant" from an auto-parts store. That seems to work well for applications where typical silicone caulk isn't quite robust enough.

Minne, I did get my dodger and bimini installed today. I realized that I was missing the straps that keep the dodger up, so I had to improvise, but hey, they are both up. I managed to do mine in the daylight, before the storm came. Good luck with yours; hope you got everything right!
 

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If there is too much free play in the shaft, you really should replace the cutless bearing while you are at it. Although it can be a bugger of a job, the consequences of not doing it include vibration, possible damage to gearbox and premature wear of the expensive shaft and PSS itself. These dripless seals are marvellous, but if they do fail, the boat will sink far quicker than would usually be the case with a leaky stuffing box.
 

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.....These dripless seals are marvellous, but if they do fail, the boat will sink far quicker than would usually be the case with a leaky stuffing box.
Probably the same as the connector hose letting go on a stuffing box. Although, I've never heard of a PSS bellows letting go, especially within the 5 yr recommended lifespan. Has anyone else?
 

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About to start the same project myself. Been procrastinating this project since we purchased 2 summers ago and obviously the boat needs to be hauled. We're hauling out next week for new bottom paint. Going to replace the cutlass bearing while we're at it. As far as I can tell nothing has been done to the stuffing box in a long time. The coupler is a pile of rust. Have been soaking it w/ PB Blaster all winter. Was able to remove all coupler bolts last weekend. Next is cutting the coupler to remove it from the shaft. Good rainy day project.
Jim
 

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Mission accomplished.
It took longer to set up dust control and fire prevention than to do the job. About an hour w/ 4 1/2" grinder cutting on top of the key way. A few taps on a chisel in the cut and the coupler is off. Much easier than I expected.
Can"t go any farther til I'm on the hard.
Jim
 

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Just amazing how well those metal cutting wheels work Jim isn't it? I have a 14" metal chop saw and when doing things on the wheeled cradle for my boat it's usually easier to use the grinder with cutting wheel
 

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I feel your pain:) A couple of months ago, on a mooring in FL, I took on the long delayed task of separating the shaft coupling. The bolts had been soaked with PbB for a LONG time and were going nowhere. This is at arm's reach, mind you, of course, where it cannot be seen except with mirrors. Well, I went to Home Depot and bought that small profile Milwaukee rechargeable recip saw and a bunch of metal blades and succeeded in cutting off the nuts by feel. What a great little tool! It took the better part of a day and three or four blades but I finally got all the bolts cut off. The shaft alignment, which I had been worried about, since it had not been checked in so long was, of course perfect, needing no mount adjustments:)
 

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Made my day.
Don't think I'd want to do the same job in a gas boat. Quite the spark show! Melted the lens on one of my LED lights.
Jim
Yes, that's why I didn't grind the bolts off which would have been much quicker. I have a small grinder on board that actually works off the inverter but thought grinding would be a great way to start a fire and to do damage to the tranny and anything else, not being able to actually see it. No way to control the sparks way in there. With the little saw, I was able to go slow and check it with a mirror now and then to make sure I was cutting only what needed to be cut. Was able to slice the nut side off flush with the coupling, doing no damage to the coupling, tranny seal, or anything else.

I'm not a big fan of Milwaukee tools but this is a great little saw to have on the boat:http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-M12-12-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Hackzall-Reciprocating-Saw-1-Battery-Kit-2420-21/202311908
 

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Bolts wasn't the issue. The coupler was. I have a coupler flange puller. Not enough room for it. The coupler had to be split. No way around it. I considered cutting w/ a saw but the grinder did a much faster and easier job. Lots of wet towels covering everything helped a bunch.
Jim
 

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Jim, two thoughts in the event that soap (or grease) and brute force won't do.

Maybe there's enough meat on that fitting to polish it down a bit, taking down the ribs without compromising the strength?

Or the opposite, have a shop fill it and shim it out, so it fits the 2" hose, and get that.

I wish someone could magically invent an inductively coupled electric motor/prop, so we could just stop making holes in otherwise watertight hulls...I know, all it takes is money.(G)
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Hello, thanks for the suggestion. I re-measured with calipers, and it's 2". So, I'm good. I have the hose on order. I'll be assembling everything as soon as it arrives. Hopefully I'll have everything together soon. If I can get back to the boat.
 
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