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So, this is probably a stupid question, but it's really got me stumped:

Say you're long-term cruising in a medium/large boat - maybe 75'. When you reach a place you want to stop for a day or so, you drop the hook and dinghy to the shore, right? But then, what do you do with the dinghy while you shop/go eat/whatever?
 

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There's usually a place to lock it (have a long and a short cable/chain available).. in other locations it may be safe to simply leave it, esp if you're not long gone or far away.

Here in BC there's rarely a reason to worry about the tender ashore.. everyone else already has their own.

In the Caribbean there are some places that have well-organized "boat boys" who will arrange for someone to keep an eye on your tender for a nominal fee. We've found that (in reputable areas) the cost is minimal.. $5 E.C. or so.. and you're seen to be contributing to the local economy.Often using a boat boy's services in general provides you some protection. Other areas like Cariaccou, for example, simply seem to have no crime culture whatsoever.

Clearly identifying your tender is a good idea too. One other thing.. outboards seem to be the target of most such thefts - fairly anonymous items and easy to move - it's a good idea to make your motor look unique or otherwise beat up and unattractive. In Mexico recently some tenders were stolen, to be "found and returned" for a fee some days later - sans motors... somebody had a bit of a racket going on.
 

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Locking the outboard to the boat and locking the boat up are both really, really good ideas. I prefer the Stazo outboard motor lock. Very heavy stainless steel construction. Looks like this:



Available from sailorsolutions.com where i got the photo.
 

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Locking the outboard to the boat and locking the boat up are both really, really good ideas. I prefer the Stazo outboard motor lock. Very heavy stainless steel construction. Looks like this:



Available from sailorsolutions.com where i got the photo.
I just put a padlock between the two dogs on the outboard but SD's lock looks nicer, and more expensive! :p
 

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Unfortunately, the dogs on the outboard don't always cooperate with being able to throw a padlock on them. The padlocks also tend to rust up and become impossible to unlock. And I can cut through a padlock in a few minutes with a wide assortment of things... leaving the outboard free to walk...where this lock is a good deal harder to deal with.

I just put a padlock between the two dogs on the outboard but SD's lock looks nicer, and more expensive! :p
 

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about dingy identity....

I've heard both for and against having your boat name on your dingy...... the against suggested it told people you weren't currently on your boat.

any opinions on this?

Derek
 

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My boat's name is Blythe Spirit, the dinghy's name is Mahalo. I bought it used and decided to leave the old name on it. Plus, no way to get it off without damage to the hypalon.

Locks are good, chaining to a tree is good, but a determined thief will get it no matter what you do. Here in Zihua, now that I'm living ashore more than on the boat (heh, heh), I pay a guy for guarding it 24 hours a day. He's a fisherman, and has other guys watch it when he's gone. So far, no problems. He even washes it. All for about $15 USD a week.

What works, works, what doesn't means a missing dinghy or motor, there's no universal formula, sometimes stuff just happens!
 

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Yup.
I've heard both for and against having your boat name on your dingy...... the against suggested it told people you weren't currently on your boat.

any opinions on this?

Derek
 

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I've heard both for and against having your boat name on your dingy...... the against suggested it told people you weren't currently on your boat.

any opinions on this?

Derek
In my experience, the people who steal from your boat are not normally opportunists, they do this stuff for a living. Your leaving and returning to your boat is observed and noted, cross-referenced with data on the other boaties you consort with. You can paint whatever you want on your dingy, it'll not change the fact that you are being watched.

The only safeguard I use is to etch/carve a name onto the underside of the seat where it can be found if you need to prove ownership. Anywhere else, it will be removed. Even better of course is if it has a serial number, record that in your logbook. This is compelling evidence to the local Gendarmarie.
 

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All good ideas. I will repeat some passed on to me. Make your dink and motor unattractive. Don't take the motor if you can row.

Last, a fellow told me he cut a hole in the bottom of his hard-bottom dink and had a well-made plug to fit that was fastened by a large wing-nut and clamp. Just take the plug with you when you leave the boat on the berach. Turn the boat over on top of the oars. This hides the oars and reveals the hole.
 

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If you are taking a dinghy ashore from your 75' boat, you leave the cook on the mother ship and leave one crew with the dinghy while you take the other crew with you to carry your purchases.

The "hole in the bottom" idea reminds me of the guy at the bar who's just ordered a beer, HAS to go to the head, and doesn't want anyone snitching his new mug of brew. So he puts a note next to the mug: "I spit in this beer." When he gets back he finds that someone else has added: "So did I.". Someone who's up for stealing a dinghy isn't going to think twice about adding another hole to a boat that already has one.
 
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