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Unpaid Intern
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
Some of you may know that we've been preparing to sail our "new" 1984 Sabre 34 home from CT to MD, starting this past weekend. Well, we did indeed depart, and the boat is now on the Chesapeake Bay! She's not home quite yet, as it worked out well to make the trip in two "legs", the first from CT to VA, the second from VA to MD (this coming weekend).

Once I have more pics together, I'll post more of them, and more details of our trip. Suffice to say it was WET, and we made good time. We took the Long Island Sound through NYC route, then out at Sandy Hook straight to the Chesapeake Bay. It took us about 71 hours from departure to arrival, and that includes the 9 hours we anchored at night near Throgs Neck. We averaged 6.1 knots while underway--not too bad--though it rained and rained, so we were always in foulies everything was always wet.

Anyway, the point is that we all arrived safely, the boat did very well, and she's almost home. :)

More to come... For now, here's a pic of Valinor taken shortly after we arrived at the marina at 5am. Thanks as always to all the Sailnet members who helped me through the purchase and prepping for launch this spring.
-J
 

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Telstar 28
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Nicely done Joz... looking forward to a detailed post with more pix. :)
 

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Unpaid Intern
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Congrats Joe! How did you miss all that big stuff that came through yesterday??!! Hope you have a great ride up the bay this weekend. She's looking good!!
Funny you should ask. One of my crew had XM Weather with his GPS. So we watched the cells come up out of Suffolk, VA, clock through Norfolk and Virginia Beach, then up across the bridge tunnel and right at us. Literally, the storm cells were following our track line right at us for hours. We just looked at the cell vector projections, and turned port or starboard--whichever looked more favorable. We never got hit head on.

Although XM Weather was a great tool, I wonder how much of it was luck and how much of it was making the right calls. Maybe a little of both.

Worst we got was tons of rain, a bit of wind, and one of the strangest lightning/thunder experiences I've had--in the fog. We were totally blocked in with fog, yet surround by very close thunder and lightning. Really weird.
-J

P.S. Thanks mgmhead and smackdaddy! We're looking forward to the sail home to MD.
 

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Tartan 37C
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Wondering why you went down the coast and up the bay & not the Delaware River and C&D canal route? Other than missing the thrill of the Delaware, it's a much shorter trip.
 

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Six point one on a 34 foot boat sustained over that stretch of active sailing is great passage speed. Well done, if wetly done.
Ditto. Well done. Boat looks great!

And, yeah, I'm curious too about your choice of route too? Was that the plan, or a change due to weather?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The question about the route is a good one. I know it seems a little odd, but it worked well for us. There are a couple things you should know.

1) My crew would not have been able to take enough time off work to accomodate a trip all the way from CT to MD in our slip, so it was likely we were looking at 2 legs--either CT to Cape May-ish, or CT or Norfolk, then a second leg where my wife and I complete the delivery home to MD.

2) My entire crew (three others besides me) for Leg 1 live in the Hampton Roads area, so having this "stop over" in Norfolk eliminated a lot of logistical issues.

We decided to shoot for Norfolk with Cape May as a back-up in case of bad weather. This allowed us to a) deliver my entire crew to their home base, b) borrow a crewmember's car to drive home to MD (which my wife and I bring back to them a few days later), and c) have someone to check in on the boat where it sits now (very close to a crewmember's home).

I'm also more familiar with the Chesapeake Bay, so the sail up the Bay is more comfortable territory for me, so I don't need experienced crew. I wouldn't need that crew for the Delaware route either, but there I'd have transportation/logistical problems with a Cape May stop-over.

So basically, we added 100 miles of ocean passage--about 16 hours at our speed--to bring in a lot of benefit in terms of logistics.

To be clear, we would never have done that if the weather forecast was looking bad for continuing past Cape May. It was just our goal, and we were lucky enough to get a weather window that allowed it.

One thing to note about our average speed. We were motorsailing for a good portion, because of light winds right on the stern. Just didn't want to mislead anyone. But we did sail well on the trip, even surfing at one point at 11.9 knots over the ground (under single reefed main and about 2/3 of the genoa)!
-J
 

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Telstar 28
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Makes sense to me... ;)
The question about the route is a good one. I know it seems a little odd, but it worked well for us. There are a couple things you should know.

1) My crew would not have been able to take enough time off work to accomodate a trip all the way from CT to MD in our slip, so it was likely we were looking at 2 legs--either CT to Cape May-ish, or CT or Norfolk, then a second leg where my wife and I complete the delivery home to MD.

2) My entire crew (three others besides me) for Leg 1 live in the Hampton Roads area, so having this "stop over" in Norfolk eliminated a lot of logistical issues.

We decided to shoot for Norfolk with Cape May as a back-up in case of bad weather. This allowed us to a) deliver my entire crew to their home base, b) borrow a crewmember's car to drive home to MD (which my wife and I bring back to them a few days later), and c) have someone to check in on the boat where it sits now (very close to a crewmember's home).

I'm also more familiar with the Chesapeake Bay, so the sail up the Bay is more comfortable territory for me, so I don't need experienced crew. I wouldn't need that crew for the Delaware route either, but there I'd have transportation/logistical problems with a Cape May stop-over.

So basically, we added 100 miles of ocean passage--about 16 hours at our speed--to bring in a lot of benefit in terms of logistics.

To be clear, we would never have done that if the weather forecast was looking bad for continuing past Cape May. It was just our goal, and we were lucky enough to get a weather window that allowed it.

One thing to note about our average speed. We were motorsailing for a good portion, because of light winds right on the stern. Just didn't want to mislead anyone. But we did sail well on the trip, even surfing at one point at 11.9 knots over the ground (under single reefed main and about 2/3 of the genoa)!
-J
 

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Congratulations (with a touch of still-on-the-hard envy).

Can you say what device had you pulling in XM weather? Sounds like a good thing to have along!!
 

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Telstar 28
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A lot of the semi-portable garmin units have this as an optional feature... IIRC, the 478 and 378 both do...
Congratulations (with a touch of still-on-the-hard envy).

Can you say what device had you pulling in XM weather? Sounds like a good thing to have along!!
 

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Congratulations on your new vessel and a safe trip. You did go a little out of your way but guess the logistics required it. We did a similar trip in reverse. We sailed from Bodkin Pt just north of Annapolis up to Chesapeake City in the C&D on Wednesday April 22nd. Then left the docks at the Inn there at 7 am Thursday morning. By 5 pm the next day we were tied up at a marina in Tarrytown NY.

We were in Catskill with the mast down and safely stored by 12 noon on Sunday. Sean at the marina with the gin pole there is great. (Not to forget about the lovely ladies in the bar) We had current pushing us the whole trip expect for about 6 hours going through NYC.

It went so well we were sorry the Erie Canal was not open so we could get started through it.

The weather was great except rather cool over night up the Jersey coast. The only excitement was the VHF antenna scraping across the beams at the second bridge in the Cape May canal. Our mast is only 53 feet above the water so we thought we were fine at half tide. However there was a strong westerly wind that must have been trying to push the Delaware to the Atlantic though the canal ?

Thanks to the folks on here that provided us with some local info.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Congratulations (with a touch of still-on-the-hard envy).

Can you say what device had you pulling in XM weather? Sounds like a good thing to have along!!
As sailingdog guessed, it was a Garmin 478c with the XM option. I can't remember which service package my crewmember had, but it's one of the marine-specific options, so it showed not only the storm cells, but the predicted vectors, sort of like hurricane tracking. I don't have the device or XM service, but it is a very useful tool. I would consider it down the line, but can't justify it now. Great to have for the passage.
-J
 

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Telstar 28
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:D I've installed enough of them... :)

As sailingdog guessed, it was a Garmin 478c with the XM option. I can't remember which service package my crewmember had, but it's one of the marine-specific options, so it showed not only the storm cells, but the predicted vectors, sort of like hurricane tracking. I don't have the device or XM service, but it is a very useful tool. I would consider it down the line, but can't justify it now. Great to have for the passage.
-J
 

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Unpaid Intern
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For anyone following along, we made it home yesterday, all the way to our boat's new slip! It's been a long journey just to get her here, now the new one starts, just owning and maintaining a boat, and sailing. :)
 
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