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Hi folks - I have a few questions regarding sailboat repair for a 19' Cape Dory Typhoon weekender. See photo attached.

First issue: Can anyone suggest a somewhat simple fix for this split teak in the cockpit ? I'll have to fix it at the slip, in the water, and don't have much in the way of wood working tools. I'm thinking some adhesive to seal the crack and then a brass screw drilled at the 90 where the two pieces connect, but I wonder if this would be enough to prevent future splitting and was thinking of reinforcing the backside with a corner brace of some sort, although I'm not keen on putting any more holes in the deck so I'm thinking maybe I could attach the brace using epoxy?

Second issue: The previous owner repaired a hole in the corner of the cockpit using some grey epoxy of sorts...not sure what it is. I'd like to sand it out and apply some primer/white gelcoat just to make it look a little better than a big gray patch. Any suggestions on the feasibility of this? Suggestions on paint products to use?

It may be obvious from my proposed solutions here that I'm a complete novice so pardon any naive suggestions I've posed here. Ive looked at youtube to try and find some solutions but can't find anything specific to these issues...maybe I'm not searching under right terms? Also, I've stripped the varnish and am going to apply teak oil.

Thanks for any suggestions!
 

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Senior Member
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Looks like you could get some clamps on each edge of the teak piece so it could be glued and clamped while it sets... however the crack looks well weathered and the repair may not end up lasting long. That's a long break -had it been fresh you could certainly successfully have glued it. Still is worth a try.

The grey patch needs smoothing and refinishing and it will be tough to get a true match - but anything close will look better than now.

Good luck.
 

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Master Mariner
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If you take that piece of wood off the boat, clean up the mating surfaces of the crack and get some clamps, using Resorcinol Glue, you should have a joint that, if not nearly invisible, at least not very noticeable once you have varnished the piece. I would not try repairing it in place as I doubt you could do the job properly.
 

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I would get a sanding block to smooth the gray blob. It appears to be regular epoxy to me. As for the board, I would simply make a new one but I have some experience at woodworking as well as the necessary tools and equipment. You could try repairing but since it is a longitudinal break at a point where it could receive a lot of shearing pressure I do not think the repair would hold. A proper glue joint can be stronger than the base material but given the restrictions I think finding a cabinet shop to make a replacement is a better value.
 

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scuff up the two sides of that crack with a 60 grit hand sanded
if you have a biscut joiner heres where it comes in handy, if you dont then
grab a drill bit and some small bore stainless rod and cut pieces to say 4-6 inches and drill out and place a spin every 8 -12 inches the length.
epoxy the joint and clamp across with atleast 4 clamps to maintain even pressure across the repair
once dry sand and finish , while your at it might as well pull the other side and sand and refinish so they match.
 

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.....Also, I've stripped the varnish and am going to apply teak oil. .....
I don't think you're going to like this path. Teak oil attracts dirt and it wouldn't be my first choice for something I was leaning against. Natural weathered bare teak is fine, just wash it will boat soap and a soft scotch brite (never use a bristle brush on it). If you insist on a coating, that is a much longer discussion.

I'm not sure what repair standard you're looking for. If you're just trying to make these more presentable, I would block sand the grey patch and try to get as close a paint match as I could. Gel coat takes some real skill to blend. If it was the right color, the eye wouldn't notice it much at all.

As for the coaming, to do it right, you have to replace that board. I'm sure it could be repaired by removing it, cleaning it up, re-gluing and clamping. You can still do it on the boat, just not while installed. I bet you could search around for someone that could make you a new one, if you brought the old one to them. This would be the best repair, but may mismatch the age/wear of the other side and you could find yourself doing both.
 

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Hi folks - I have a few questions regarding sailboat repair for a 19' Cape Dory Typhoon weekender. See photo attached.

First issue: Can anyone suggest a somewhat simple fix for this split teak in the cockpit ? I'll have to fix it at the slip, in the water, and don't have much in the way of wood working tools. I'm thinking some adhesive to seal the crack and then a brass screw drilled at the 90 where the two pieces connect, but I wonder if this would be enough to prevent future splitting and was thinking of reinforcing the backside with a corner brace of some sort, although I'm not keen on putting any more holes in the deck so I'm thinking maybe I could attach the brace using epoxy?

Second issue: The previous owner repaired a hole in the corner of the cockpit using some grey epoxy of sorts...not sure what it is. I'd like to sand it out and apply some primer/white gelcoat just to make it look a little better than a big gray patch. Any suggestions on the feasibility of this? Suggestions on paint products to use?

It may be obvious from my proposed solutions here that I'm a complete novice so pardon any naive suggestions I've posed here. Ive looked at youtube to try and find some solutions but can't find anything specific to these issues...maybe I'm not searching under right terms? Also, I've stripped the varnish and am going to apply teak oil.

Thanks for any suggestions!
Note that the split combing partially supports the small bronze sheet winch on the port side of the cockpit which may, in fact, account for the split if the winch base support has weakened at the deck, which I suspect, allowing the winch to rotate outward and "twist" the combing across the grain, causing the split.

Considering the condition of the wood, both the combing and the trim board across the transom (and I suspect the starboard combing as well), the appropriate "fix" would be to remove all three pieces. As for the split board, with that off the boat one could apply West Systems epoxy along the face of the split and then, using some clamps, hold it together while the epoxy sets up. With that, one could drill vertical holes, perhaps 3/16" dia into the combing from the top, across the split, and countersink bronze lag screws across the split to act as drift pins. I'd likely do that at, perhaps, 8" intervals. The holes can then be "plugged" with teak plugs, set with varnish. If I were doing it, I'd add a 1/4" facing to the inside surface of the combing, at least between the aft trim board and the aft end of the dog-house, forward. If you can't find teak--depending upon your locale--one could use light Mahogany which would be close enough. Then refinish all three pieces.

While the combings and trim are off the boat, check the port winch base at the deck and make any necessary repairs there and take a palm sander to the "gray" patch, which I suspect is gray Marine-tex. (Check the inside of the aft bulkhead through the bustle to see what the conditions there are like, as that looks to be a sizable hole.) The best fix would be a "patch" of glass cloth laid over the damage--a small West System repair kit would do--sanded smooth and then painted with gel-coat tinted to match the the surrounding glass. Or simply paint the entire aft bulkhead with tinted white EZPoxy. The color match might not be perfect with respect to the rest of the cockpit but it would be consistent across the bulkhead below the aft trim and likely wouldn't be noticeable.

All of the foregoing really wouldn't be difficult nor terribly time consuming and could easily be done in a day or two. The Typhoon is a handsome boat and worthy of a good fix.

FWIW...
 
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The folks who suggested taking the coaming off and gluing it beat me to the punch; you can't fix that thing in place. If the crack hasn't weathered the wood past the point where the two sides still mate, then Gorilla Glue will make that fix stronger than the surrounding wood. If you can't match the halves anymore, then you can fill with thickened epoxy, but that might be beyond what you can do or at least do on board. Ditto the advice about getting a new coaming made (maybe two to match) as the cleanest and easiest (and most expensive) fix.

As for the epoxy fix in the corner, sand it and paint it. The color match will be the toughest part. You will find that marine fiberglass paint is expensive, and it ain't worth the price you will pay for a quart of even the cheapest stuff to paint over that small spot. For a spot that small, you may want to consider going to the local hardware store and getting a "sample" size of an off-white outdoor house paint. Give it a try before you spend big bucks for something so minor.

Oh, and the Typhoon Weekender is a great boat! Congratulations. A little tender for my wife's taste, but a rock-solid, forgiving and beautiful craft.
 

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The folks who suggested taking the coaming off and gluing it beat me to the punch; you can't fix that thing in place. If the crack hasn't weathered the wood past the point where the two sides still mate, then Gorilla Glue will make that fix stronger than the surrounding wood. ...
I would second this recommendation, I have always been pleased with the results of Gorilla glue. Definitely remove the piece and do the repair at home on a bench. Get four or five furniture clamps, clean, dampen, glue and clamp. If you have any difficulty lining up the two sections for clamping, then take them to a woodworker and have notches routed for "biscuits" which will serve to align the edges for joining.
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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Hi folks - I have a few questions regarding sailboat repair for a 19' Cape Dory Typhoon weekender. See photo attached.

First issue: Can anyone suggest a somewhat simple fix for this split teak in the cockpit ? I'll have to fix it at the slip, in the water, and don't have much in the way of wood working tools. I'm thinking some adhesive to seal the crack and then a brass screw drilled at the 90 where the two pieces connect, but I wonder if this would be enough to prevent future splitting and was thinking of reinforcing the backside with a corner brace of some sort, although I'm not keen on putting any more holes in the deck so I'm thinking maybe I could attach the brace using epoxy?

Second issue: The previous owner repaired a hole in the corner of the cockpit using some grey epoxy of sorts...not sure what it is. I'd like to sand it out and apply some primer/white gelcoat just to make it look a little better than a big gray patch. Any suggestions on the feasibility of this? Suggestions on paint products to use?

It may be obvious from my proposed solutions here that I'm a complete novice so pardon any naive suggestions I've posed here. Ive looked at youtube to try and find some solutions but can't find anything specific to these issues...maybe I'm not searching under right terms? Also, I've stripped the varnish and am going to apply teak oil.

Thanks for any suggestions!
off season you can remove the teak boards and glue it up with west system or another epoxy it would have to be gently clamped to stabilize the glue joint without compressing the glue too much. After it sets you can use 80 grit orbital to remove excess and all that shot varnish..shift to 180 to fair it all out Then if desired revarnish 5 coats before you bed it and reinstall. The dark patch is a bummer. tape off surrounding area sand smooth. That looks like marineTex and its too dark for white gel coat to cover and match convincingly.You might be able to sand most of it off and then do a build up with white epoxy filler till it is smooth again. I make some and use pigment so it can blend into the broader area. etc If the old patch is thin different approach use whitened epoxy to layer small glass cloth patches. Sand. fill sand
This can also be done with polyester resin with pigment with the advantage if it does begin to blend you dont need to worry about u.v. protection. Some local glass suppliers have ballpark mixes for hatteras white etc ask around

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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off season you can remove the teak boards and glue it up with west system or another epoxy it would have to be gently clamped to stabilize the glue joint without compressing the glue too much. After it sets you can use 80 grit orbital to remove excess and all that shot varnish..shift to 180 to fair it all out Then if desired revarnish 5 coats before you bed it and reinstall. The dark patch is a bummer. tape off surrounding area sand smooth. That looks like marineTex and its too dark for white gel coat to cover and match convincingly.You might be able to sand most of it off and then do a build up with white epoxy filler till it is smooth again. I make some and use pigment so it can blend into the broader area. etc If the old patch is thin different approach use whitened epoxy to layer small glass cloth patches. Sand. fill sand
This can also be done with polyester resin with pigment with the advantage if it does begin to blend you dont need to worry about u.v. protection. Some local glass suppliers have ballpark mixes for hatteras white etc ask around

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
apologies other replies did not come up before I posted. Forgive the redundency! Enjoy the boat its a sweet one.


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

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If you are going to glue the pieces back together, you'll need to gently clean the mating surface. I'd use a toothbrush and a gentle scrub with 409 or Simple Green for an initial clean up and then with acetone. Dirt and crud that's accumulated in the break will hinder glue adhesion and the natural oil in the teak needs to be cleaned away for the same reason. If you get too rambunctious with your scrubbing/cleaning, any material that you remove will make the repair that much more obvious.

Some kind of mechanical support will really help the survivability of the repair. Doubt a repair would last without putting some kind of additional support in the pieces. Dowels inserted using a dowelling jig would be the easiest and neatest way to do this. A basic dowelling jig is pretty cheap and about the only way you'd be able to get the drill holes for the dowels to line up. Another way would be to glue some 1/2" or so thick by 1"-2" wide teak strips on the face of the board. If you spaced them out the width of a person seated they wouldn't be too much of a comfort issue.

I'd use epoxy. Don't clamp the pieces too tight as the epoxy is stronger than the wood. If you apply too much pressure with the clamps, you'll squeeze out most of the epoxy which makes for a weak joint.

As others have said, the pieces have to come off the boat to make a repair.
 

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..... using Resorcinol Glue......
Capta's suggestion for resorcinol is a good one. Not as easy to find as epoxy, but superior in many ways. As miraculous as epoxy is, it will degrade with exposure to sunlight, heat and moisture. Sounds like a sailboat cockpit to me. The big downside to resorcinol is the mating surfaces need to be pretty exact and clamped tight to bond. It won't fill a missing splinter or an imperfection. Given all the glue that must be removed, mating the surfaces perfectly could take a bit of work. Depends on how easily it comes off.

If the OP isn't going to coat the teak with varnish or other UV inhibitor, I think epoxy is out.

The more I think about it, the more likely the OP should make this a binary decision. Leave it alone (if it's functional), or fully replace the board.
 

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If you take that piece of wood off the boat, clean up the mating surfaces of the crack and get some clamps, using Resorcinol Glue, you should have a joint that, if not nearly invisible, at least not very noticeable once you have varnished the piece. I would not try repairing it in place as I doubt you could do the job properly.
Captain Andy is right ! Take your time, do it like Capt A said you will find it better than it is now an it will last for you , . one jus cant GOOBER on boat repairs, they should be done with lovin tenderness or not at all. eh mate?
 
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