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The jam cleats in photo are mounted backwards. The non jam side if the cleat should take the load. If the jam side takes the load, the line can JAM in the cleat and will be hard to release under tension.
 

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they are mounted right . there is a separate cleat for each winch. the forward winch has a cleat but they are using the cleat for the aft winch.
 

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I'd say use clams. mount them as you wish, but they would work well in this instance. Given this is a small(er) boat, clam is fine. I used jams on my Capri 22, clams on my Capri 25, and cams on my S2 7.9, I liked the clams so much I replaced my cams on the 7.9 with clams. They aren't perfect of course but they are easy to throw a line into and have grab. You must pull back to release, but on a lighter boat that is OK.

Oh and cross sheet if you are sailing solo, it make everything easier.
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I'll be the contrarian. The installation is fine the way it is.

Self-tailing winches are slower to unload than plain winches; no race boat this size would have them. They still need a cam cleat on tender boats; you can't release the line without going over to the winch and unwinding it. Same with jam cleats, only worse if there are not enough turns on the winch (less than 2, or perhaps 3)

I always mount a cam cleat down stream of self-tailing winches.

IMO, you don't need to do anything, and many of the suggestions will make the boat a lesser sailing machine. I'd sit somewhere else. Possibly, you could put the cam cleat farther aft on the coaming. But I would leave it as it is, unless I felt I was smarter than the designer....

cam cleat for winch
 

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Correct. Technically the forward cleat is for the jib sheet and the rear clear is for Spinnaker control lines that come off the rear winch.

But I regularly use the rear clear for jib sheet too when I'm solo (or when someone is sitting/sleeping in the way). Even though it's 'backwards' it works just fine and in 12 years I've not had a sheet jam, so it isn't something I worry about.

In the photo, it's obviously a light wind day (notice just one wrap on the drum), but even when it's honking, I've not had any issues with using the cleat 'backwards''.

Ymmv, this is just my experience.

~fortunat

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I would discourage the use of turning blocks or clutches on the jib sheets. Both add friction to the jibsheet when you release it under load, and they snag hockles, preventing the line from running free. I crewed on a boat recently with turning blocks aft of the winches, and the jib sheets were stopped by hockles repeatedly. The turning block pictured on the Catalina 36 is only used because, without it, the jib sheet would rub against the gunwale and the dodger frame. As long as the sheet can run straight from the genoa car to the winch without rubbing anything, there's no reason to use turning blocks.
 

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We had the Schaefer jam cleats on our J/36. Quick and easy. As others have said, jam end points back at the winch so you can unclear it even under load. Though flat on the same level as the winch bases, make sure they're angled properly towards the line as it comes off the winch. If they're too much in line with the sheet they are harder to cleat off because the line from the winch interferes. If they're too much out of line the sheets will pull the cleats sideways instead of lengthwise, and they won't be as strong.
 

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Have had two boats that came with clam cleats for the jib sheets. They are easy to cleat a line but just as easy, if not easier, to accidentally release them. Switched out the sheet jam cleats after too many accidental releases.

Sheeting direct to the wrong side of a jamb cleat may work fine on a smaller boat but it's not the best way especially on larger boats. Jam cleats are designed to quickly release/cleat a line with just one turn around the cleat. As the name implies a heavy load on a line can make pulling the line out of a mis- aligned cleat or an improperly used jam cleat a challenge. The usual set up is pad-eyes at the stern with snatch or other blocks to sheet a spinnaker and then led to the properly installed cleat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thanks for all the replies, seems like there are a lot of opinions and several different ways to fix this. I will have to see what I can find, finding the jam cleat like I wanted has not proven easy. I will figure out something over the winter as I feel this current setup is dangerous to have in the cockpit with me and any one on the boat with me. it is just a matter of time before someone gets cut on that thing.
 

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I have this cam cleat that is for the jib sheet and I want to do something else with it. As you can see, it is in a really perfect spot for the winch, but that is also the cockpit of the boat and it hits you right in the back all the time. Anyone have any suggestions?
My Mirage 24 has a clam cleat mounted aft of the winch on the same plane as the winch. A two-horned cleat is on the coaming aft of the clam cleat at a slight angle. When single-handing I usually use the clam cleat when tacking, then adjust the main. If I want to I may secure the sheet on the horns.
-CH
 
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