SailNet Community banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a soft spot on my cabin roof, got it cut out and almost cleaned out. If I brace it up from the underside and epoxy a sheet of heavy biaxial cloth, would that keep the ceiling from sagging when I remove braces? Or do I need to replace core and epoxy outer laminate skin back on before removing braces?
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,616 Posts
How are you planning to maintain the camber of the cabintop when you replace it? What happened to the cross-pieces which, based on the lighter bands crossing the boards visible in the photo, seem to have been removed? Are the boards visible in the photo the overhead in the cabin? (Ceiling on a boat is the lining - usually wooden slats - along the insides of the hull.) Supporting the new cabintop so that it curves properly is going to be a major hurdle without the proper support underneath, and leaving the overhead in place would seem to make it really difficult to support the new cabintop so that it comes out looking fair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
There was no support for the camber in the ceiling. I going to temporarily support it up while I make repairs. The other boards were strip planking, they had to be removed because of water intrusion causing them to warp. No the boards are not visible from underneath in the cabin it’s just bare fiberglass. Yeah it’s a bear of a job to tackle but I’m ready, just need some advice on how to’s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
they are some kind of strip planking that is embedded in the fiberglass looks to be cedar but then I am no wood expert, the wood on top of it was the same just laid in a different orientation.
 

·
Registered
‘77 Pearson 10m
Joined
·
466 Posts
As far as you know, does that planking still adhere to the bare fiberglass ceiling in the cabin? And does that whole two layer sandwich flex a lot when you compress it, is it fairly bouncy? If so, you can reproduce the lateral curve with strips of plywood against the ceiling and propped up from underneath by one to three vertical struts of something like 2x2s. The pressure will bow the plywood strips into a fairly smooth curve. Adjusting the length of the struts and the thickness and width of the plywood should result in a satisfactory curve.
Replacing the core with endgrain balsa which is easier to creat compound curved than planks or plywood would be my recommendation. Embed all that in epoxy and replace replace the skin, weigh it all down for good adhesion.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top