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1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
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could also have a combination of fitting a 3/4 inches piece of starboard (hardware will have it) as wide as you can fit and use those fender washers, might help to spread the load and will be easier to trim to size and avoid the cave in as you have now.
Am afraid the aluminum will have trouble with the stainless fasteners.
Just an idea.
 

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1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
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583 Posts
you are right, have used starboard in the past as well as marine plywood, because so easy to work with and easy to find, the following is a very nice and complete write-up on backing plates.
thanks
 

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1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
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Thank ya'll for the good advise. I think I will go with the fiberglassing - I have never done that, so this could be a good starter project? I realize that the pictures make the pedestal inside appear flatter than it actually is. I wanted to extend the backing/support outside of the walls of the pedestal and I think I'd never get a proper flat surface for a big G10 plate...

I will report how it went, now I need to find out about glassing...
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was thinking about the backing plate thing and I do agree with pdqaltair.
forget about the backing plate, has not use!!!
wow, heresy!!!
I start to hear the results of my post, well will run for cover but.
The forces acting on a mounted winch are basically shear forces applied and resisted by the few screws holding the winch, there is no vertical upwards force!
No way the winch will be pulled out of the base by grinding the handle!
This will be different to a mooring cleat where the forces are not only sideways but vertically.
The resistance and counterforce opposed to the grinding of the handle resides on those screws, the only logical way to reinforce it is by building a solid layer of very resistant wall, that should be accomplished by layers of fiberglass either epoxied or preferable vinyl resin plus cloth, in my installation 5200 for permanent bonding a piece of marine plywood, that is that, after 4 years of use no movement.
Because your surface is uneven, will need to build some layers only to provide that flat surface.
Even

"Shear stress, often denoted by τ (Greek: tau), is the component of stress coplanar with a material cross section. It arises from the shear force, the component of force vector parallel to the material cross section. Normal stress, on the other hand, arises from the force vector component perpendicular to the material cross section on which it acts."
 
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