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And you were 60 minutes from bottom. As the water goes down the boat heels/lists. Can the boat ever heel to the extent it goes over? I suppose one could toss an anchor and tie off amidship on the high side to hold her somewhat up but is that even necessary? Just wondering... Maybe a stupid question...
 

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Definitely not a stupid question, but the answer is "big" because lots of variables. What are you grounded on? Mud? Sand? Rock? You're an hour from low tide, I think you're asking, and attempts to back off or "heel" off were unavailing?

If soft bottom and not much tide drop left, then yeah, just wait it out. while waiting, put an anchor out in the direction of deeper water so as it rises, you'll stay in place and not be pushed "higher" aground by the current.

If it's a huge tide (Bay of Fundy?? Way down East Maine?), and it's only beginning to fall, your tactics may be different, and you might want to get a powerful tow and risk some keel scrapes to get off *now* before you end up on your "beam's end" at low tide. Especially true if it's rock. If mud or sand, waiting it out may work, but you'll have to close up any deck openings that could ship water as the tide comes back up while you are still laid-over. You need to float up, not fill up, on that finally-rising-again tide ;-)

I've also seen salvors weigh down the masthead with something like a big water bag, then tow her off the sand while heeled over. Different horses for different courses.

I don't think I would try to set an anchor on the high side to limit heel and "hold" the boat up as you describe, it won't be strong enough to take the weight and could cause problems. Let the boat lay over and let the new tide raise her back up.

So lots of variables.
 

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Not a stupid question at all.
drop the dinghy and go to the closest bar for 2 hours.

:)
 

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Closet Powerboater
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And you were 60 minutes from bottom. As the water goes down the boat heels/lists. Can the boat ever heel to the extent it goes over? I suppose one could toss an anchor and tie off amidship on the high side to hold her somewhat up but is that even necessary? Just wondering... Maybe a stupid question...
Been there, done that.

Rowing out a kedge anchor 90deg perpinicular to your boat, tying the rode to your mainmast halyard, and cranking like a ba$tard on the winch worked for me. I was able to tip my boat over completely on it's side. The idea behind this is you reduce draft, can motor (or use the main anchor) to go forward a bit and get off the shallows.

I was only 45min from touchdown when it happened to me, and by the time I tried this trick it was too late. We were at the end of a very long fjord (hence the speed the water ran out). It also meant there would not be any wind, or waves until the next ice age, so I could just dry out and wait for the tide to come back.

Pro Tip: Those through hulls that are waaaay above the waterline, like the bilge pump through hulls.... they're not above the waterline any longer when you're on your side.

Another Pro Tip: When the water is back-siphoning in through said through hulls, it's up against the wall, and is hard to detect until the boat rights itself and the floorboards float away! :eek: Ask me how I know. ;)

MedSailor
 

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Ok I'll ask, how did you know that?? Oh wait, been there done that?! ;)
 

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Ok I'll ask, how did you know that?? Oh wait, been there done that?! ;)
If you're asking how I knew to try it, I had previously bought 2 yachting emergency handbooks at used chandleries. I had read through the books a few times and created a mental list of things to try if TSHTF. There were lots of things to try in there. Hanging jerry cans from the boom which is poled out, didn't do squat for example, but I tried it. One of the very first things I did was turn on all the water taps to empty the 400lbs of water from the boat while I was doing everything else. Full vs. empty water tanks didn't move the waterline to any visible degree on that boat, so don't think that helped either....

Rowing the anchor out and bending a bunch of ropes together worked a treat! Having a lightweight fortress anchor came in really handy for that job. Also, if you can believe it, I bent the winch handle while winching the boat over. Adrenalin can do awesome things I guess.... I'm not a buff guy. ;)

MedSailor
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Well, if your boat happens to be a wing keel like an O'day 272 and the bottom is flat sand you just wait it out. The boat will sit just fine on the wings although it is a bit strange being on a boat that has no water under it, only beach.
You can ask me how I know this. btdt.
 

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If you can position the boat so it's heeling towards the shore. This reduces the possible flooding of water over the side when it comes back up.
 

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Begs the question "what are do doing in shallows on a failing tide? Around here in the land 3 to 6 meter tides and lots of pointy sharp stuff we try not to let that happen . An hour more of ebb is not likely to cause flooding but a set of cedar plugs for outlets could be handy.This from a guy who's hatch boards were propping up the fish boat so the rising tide just came on in.
 

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Crack a beer and and enjoy the view. Get ready to hear from your friends on why you were sitting high and dry for hours and hours...
 

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Sailing on an impoundment lake, we only have this problem in the fall when they drain it down and the spring when they fill it.. this is the chief reason we don't do burials at sea in the lake any more.
 

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You pull up the swingkeel and dump the ballast so you can motor/walk/pole off the sand bar...or pull up the keel, let it settle and grab a good book or a nap.

:D
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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one NEVER grounds in a rising tide. is a murphy law thing...lol
so WHEN you ground your boat in a falling tide, you make sure when the water again rises you do not get pushed farther onto the hard/shoal/beach by placing kedging anchors off into deeper water. you will pull your boat with these when you become impatient with being still aground in 4 more hours(2 hours too early), and after the bottom cleaning you are now able to do is finished.
 

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Happened to me in south Florida when I let a friend take the helm and he paid absolutely no attention to the GPS/Plotter/Depth finder. Two hours prior to dead low and we were tight on a sand bar and the tide was screaming out. I called towboat US and they were there in 45 minutes. The guy said well, if I can't move you, then I'll come back at high tide. He rigged a bridle to the two bow cleats, fired up his pair of 250 HP Yamaha four-strokes, and I fired up my A4. The bottom got scrubbed, a few minutes later we were anchored up in deep water, the paperwork filled out and he was on his way. And he showed us that the REAL channel was nowhere near where the markers were. Just a few stakes in the mud was the REAL channel markers. Can't say enough good things about Towboat US.

Gary :cool:
 

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Well, if your boat happens to be a wing keel like an O'day 272 and the bottom is flat sand you just wait it out. The boat will sit just fine on the wings although it is a bit strange being on a boat that has no water under it, only beach.
You can ask me how I know this. btdt.

You're saying this is NOT photoshopped?? ;)

 

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You're saying this is NOT photoshopped?? ;)
That looks like a Beneteau and I can't tell if it has wings at the bottom of the keel. Fin keel looks a bit too long for wings. Could be photoshopped or strange things can happen.

The keel on the O'day 272 is fairly shallow (shoal draft of maybe 3-4') and the wings stick out at least 1 foot either side. Makes a pretty large foot for the boat to sit on. We grounded the O 272 in the LI Sound which has a tidal range of about 8' so at low tide there was only beach while the boat stood on it's foot. Wish I had a pic of that event.
 

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The keel on the O'day 272 is fairly shallow (shoal draft of maybe 3-4') and the wings stick out at least 1 foot either side. Makes a pretty large foot for the boat to sit on. We grounded the O 272 in the LI Sound which has a tidal range of about 8' so at low tide there was only beach while the boat stood on it's foot. Wish I had a pic of that event.
That sounds terrifying! What if a gust of wind came along, couldn't the boat tip over?
 

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Sailing on an impoundment lake, we only have this problem in the fall when they drain it down and the spring when they fill it.. this is the chief reason we don't do burials at sea in the lake any more.
Can you still call it "burial at sea" when it's in a lake? Burial at lake sounds a lot like destroying evidence. ��
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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That looks like a Beneteau and I can't tell if it has wings at the bottom of the keel. Fin keel looks a bit too long for wings. Could be photoshopped or strange things can happen.
I think I see the wings.

Wings = anchor.
 
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