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Usually I swell when I drink water...


But swell is more less the over normal influence of water.. due to storms , tidal fluctuations etc...swell is above and beyond the normal rise of water in an average condition...
 

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Swells are the effects of weather systems that are a good distance away and have traveled to where you are. Seas are the effects of local weather systems. The two combined give you the local sea state. :)
 

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Cam is a swell guy with no boat...and no RV... he's currently wearing a kilt and saddlebacking sheep in the backwoods of NC. :)
 

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FOUL! Valiente did not use "SWELL" in his thread!

should been.......

"It's always the livestock molesting with you SWELL guys. Why is that?"

I have nothing to do with livestock other than hauling the shift off!
 

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blt2ski
This looks like another swell thread to ignore!

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Valiente
It's always the livestock molesting with you guys. Why is that?


Maybe it's time to add another forum title!?!?
 

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blt2ski
This looks like another swell thread to ignore!

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Valiente
It's always the livestock molesting with you guys. Why is that?


Maybe it's time to add another forum title!?!?
A swell forum about livestock? That'll put them in their place!
 

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Swells are discribed by their height, direction and time sequence from crest of the swell to the next one. Average time is seven to nine seconds.

The other Swell is a well dress person of high social position and not as gay, as some of you want them to be...
 

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How can one describe swell?

Thanks in advance
Come on guys, it's his first post and he's asked an honest question!! :mad:

Pmusu,

Boasun and some of the other less snarky people who hang out here have provided good definitions -- to which I'll add the following: think of swells as a wave form on the surface of the water running parallel to other waves in the series. While swells are often called waves, they usually aren't breaking waves as you'll find on a beach. Height is measured crest to trough and the distance between them, the wave period, is measured in units of time or distance. All things being equal, waves would take the form of a sine wave, but in reality wind, current and and other wave trains will effect their size and shape. That's probably more than you wanted to know. But, wait there's more....
.... they are a primary cause of :puke
 

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Come on guys, it's his first post and he's asked an honest question!! :mad:

.... they are a primary cause of :puke
Now we need to go to the Scopolamine thread for fighting the Mal de Mer. :puke
 

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Billy-

You're missing the main distinction. Swells are formed by a weather system some distance away and travel to where you experience them. Seas are formed by the weather you're experiencing locally.

Both swell and seas have wavelength, period, and wave height. Together, swell and seas for the sea state for any given location. If the local seas oppose the swell, bad things start to happen, as the period shortens and the height increases dramatically.
 

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Swells are the big, slow, rounded waves. they come from far away

On top (and bottom, and middle) of them is the "chop". It comes from the wind you're in now. Both can add, or subtract, from each other. Ultimately, it's all the same ocean...

hope this helped, though not sure...
 

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You're missing the main distinction. Swells are formed by a weather system some distance away and travel to where you experience them. Seas are formed by the weather you're experiencing locally.
That's a little over simplified. One can have tranquil weather locally and two different "wave trains" (a common misnomer) coming by. That will give you a sea-state to remember but has nothing to do with local weather. A "sea" is a swell, local or not. A wave? Well that's something else.

The important distinction between a swell and a wave is not about the source.

The important difference is that a swell has no forward motion and a wave does. When a swell passes under your boat, the boat will rise and fall but will not move in the direction of the swell. When your boat encounters a wave, it will generate directional movement.

A huge sea (swell) will pass under your boat without any danger to you. Right up until the top is formed into a wave by the wind and the wave breaks, then there is serious danger.

Witness the fact that the Boxing Day tsunami passed under vessels moored/anchored just offshore and they were unharmed. Why? Well, the tsunami was still a swell when it passed under the vessels. The vessels just rose and fell. When it hit shallow water, it became a wave and we all know what happened next.

The other primary distinction is that a swell will continue on it's way for hundreds and even thousands of miles whereas a wave has a relatively short lifespan (and I suppose this supports SD's original thought). That same tsunami as a swell travelled all the way across the Indian Ocean and became a very destructive wave on the African coast. Look at movies of storms and note that a large swell will have a wave break on it's top, the wave will peter out after a short while - the swell will continue on it's way.

"Seas" that are local to you are swells in the making. Unless they're heading for shore then they will stay waves and quickly dissapate.

This is getting chicken & eggish.
 

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Um, I think all waves (round swells, choppy seas, whatever) will generate lateral motion. Any time the sea is has hills on it, and you're on a slopey part of a hill, you're going to slide down. As a swell passes under you, you'll first slide downhill one way and then back the other way as the crest passes.

Gravity. It's the law.

Furthermore, swells themselves definitely have forward motion in the sense that they generally have a nonzero phase velocity, thought I suppose if swells are refracted into a bay whose diameter is an integer multiple of their wavelength, they'll become standing waves (i.e. have zero phase velocity).

A non-breaking wave is dangerous to the degree that its sides are steep. Swells are generally not dangerous because their height is small compared to their length... you can't help get pushed around a bit, but I agree not in a dangerous way.

Being generated a large distance away is an important quality of swell. Wind is what causes waves to become "pointy", but a recognizable characteristic of swell is the roundness. So imagine windy conditions a thousand miles away generating pointy waves: as the waves travel away from the wind, the points can't be mechanically supported and fall quickly down until all that's left is a round wave.
 

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That's a little over simplified. One can have tranquil weather locally and two different "wave trains" (a common misnomer) coming by. That will give you a sea-state to remember but has nothing to do with local weather. A "sea" is a swell, local or not. A wave? Well that's something else.

The important distinction between a swell and a wave is not about the source.
Actually, by definition, that is the primary difference. "Seas" are the locally generated component of sea state, and if the location you're in has no wind, this would be ZERO. "Swells" and "seas" combine to give you the local "sea state".

The important difference is that a swell has no forward motion and a wave does. When a swell passes under your boat, the boat will rise and fall but will not move in the direction of the swell. When your boat encounters a wave, it will generate directional movement.

A huge sea (swell) will pass under your boat without any danger to you. Right up until the top is formed into a wave by the wind and the wave breaks, then there is serious danger.
Actually, the danger doesn't have to do with whether the wave is swell from a distance weather system or seas generated by local winds, since either can be a danger in the right conditions. Take the swell generated by a hurricane 600 miles away.... if you're at the beach—it turns into some really nasty and tall breakers without any need for localized winds. You're actually not only oversimplifying the situation, but defining things incorrectly.

Witness the fact that the Boxing Day tsunami passed under vessels moored/anchored just offshore and they were unharmed. Why? Well, the tsunami was still a swell when it passed under the vessels. The vessels just rose and fell. When it hit shallow water, it became a wave and we all know what happened next.
This is exactly my point.... no wind was necessary to convert the swell caused by the earthquake into breaking waves. That was merely a function of water depth.

The other primary distinction is that a swell will continue on it's way for hundreds and even thousands of miles whereas a wave has a relatively short lifespan (and I suppose this supports SD's original thought). That same tsunami as a swell travelled all the way across the Indian Ocean and became a very destructive wave on the African coast. Look at movies of storms and note that a large swell will have a wave break on it's top, the wave will peter out after a short while - the swell will continue on it's way.
Waves and swell are simply the same thing, but which it is at a given location is mainly determined by the water depth. Seas are localized phenomenon that add to the total sea state when combined with the effects of swell.

"Seas" that are local to you are swells in the making. Unless they're heading for shore then they will stay waves and quickly dissapate.

This is getting chicken & eggish.
Exactly my point. However, they're not considered swell until they've left the area where the wind that generated them is located.
 

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Actually, by definition, that is the primary difference. "Seas" are the locally generated component of sea state, and if the location you're in has no wind, this would be ZERO. "Swells" and "seas" combine to give you the local "sea state".



And your source for this definition is . . . .

Take the swell generated by a hurricane 600 miles away.... if you're at the beach—it turns into some really nasty and tall breakers without any need for localized winds. You're actually not only oversimplifying the situation, but defining things incorrectly.
As I said, a swell becomes dangerous when it turns into a wave.

When I referred to tops of swells turning into waves by the wind I was not talking about the local beach, I was talking about deep ocean, something you possibly still need to experience. Oh, and I'm not "defining" anything, I'm talking from experience.

This is exactly my point.... no wind was necessary to convert the swell caused by the earthquake into breaking waves. That was merely a function of water depth.**/quote]

As I said, the swell becomes dangerous when it turns into a wave.

Waves and swell are simply the same thing, but which it is at a given location is mainly determined by the water depth. Seas are localized phenomenon that add to the total sea state when combined with the effects of swell.
So when I was in 75 knots of wind with 30 foot thingies lifting my boat up and setting it down, these were seas not swells? Yeah right. And the swells that were doing that to us looked pretty local, they hadn't come hundreds of miles.

Exactly my point. However, they're not considered swell until they've left the area where the wind that generated them is located.
Maybe not by you!!

Adamlein, a boat that is already in motion and at a speed that is conducive, will start to surf. But if it is standing still (heaved to) it will go up and it will come down. It will not generate directional movement.

Your second pragraph tells me your a wannabe scientist (or maybe a real scientist). WTF is all that stuff about??
 
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