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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With the use of UHMWPE products like pre-strectched Dynex Dux, it is now possible to rig a sailboat completely without the use of steel wire. Synthetic rigging is rigged up using deadeyes and lanyards, like a traditional tall ship. I am a big fan of this, and when it comes time to re-rig, I will be doing it in synthetic.

UPSIDES:
Cheaper than SS rigging
Low mass, far away from boats CG = faster boat
Easy to replace at sea
DIY
Easy to adjust
Corrosion free
Stronger than steel

DOWNSIDES:
UV protection becomes issue
New, not time-tested (in use in commercial fishing for about 6 years)
of course people say this about fiberglass...
Investment in new system (deadeyes are expensive)


I have also heard of Vectran being used as standing rigging, because it creeps less.

Who has done this or knows about this? It seems to be a newish idea.
Also, instead of investing in the precourt deadeyes, can you make your own? What kind of hardwood did old ships use for deadeyes?
 

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I am real interested in hearing what everyone has to say about this as well. I was planning on replacing the standing rigging soon but am not looking forward to it because of the price and having to haul the boat and drop the mast for a period of time.
 

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I was on a Hylas 70 today at the Miami show and their carbon fiber stays where shipped 14" short. the rep said the rig cost the boat owner $270k.
It looks weird to see rope holding up a 80' mast.
 

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All of my standing rigging, except the shrouds (10mm steel cable) is Dyneema.

It's safe, no stretch, light and easy to replace...

Flexible, and easy to carry spares
 

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All of my standing rigging, except the shrouds (10mm steel cable) is Dyneema.

It's safe, no stretch, light and easy to replace...

Flexible, and easy to carry spares
So...this would leave Forestay, Backstay, Runners (if applicable...can't remember if you have these rigged)

I guess the obvious question is what prevented you from choosing Dyneema for the shrouds?

What are the chances of the dyneema blowing up vs steel cable? I suppose if the Dyneema lets go, it's the same as when a rod lets go.

I am trying to find ways, outside of a carbon mast, to save weight aloft...so I'll hope this thread doesn't die quickly.
 

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I see how the rigging attaches to the chainplates, but what about attachment to the mast? Our boat has t-ball fittings which swage to the wire. I haven't seen any such fittings for synthetic. Also, it seems like one would have to keep wire for the forestay if using roller furling. Is that correct?

This is a very intersting and timely topic. Although it has has been addresed here several times in the past, just in the last year it seems like there have been additional advancements and more people actually making the switch.

I've heard that Brian Toss has said he plans to go to synthetic on his own boat (may have already done so). So where is Knothead to chime in on this?
 

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I heard Bruce Schwab say a few years ago that there really was no reason you couldn't use the new synthetic ropes as standing rigging. I guess that is becoming more common now. I used to race on a couple of Capri 30s a and it felt weird when we replaced the backstays with rope on those boats.
 

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There really going to have to ZERO in on the UV lifetime for example the PBO guys are pushing it at 3 years


There is know way its cheeper when you look at the TOTAL cost and shorter life cycle


As far as easy to replace if it fails i have not seen to many masts live through and upper shroud failure without and act of massive good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree about the UV thing, and lifetime cost, that's why I was considering machining my own deadeyes, they are the part that tips the scales on cost. Considering most people have existing turnbuckles. I still think it would be friendlier for emergency fixes, though. If you lose your mast, or almost lose your mast, it seems that rope would be easier to set up a jury rig with in an emergency. Steel cable is a little less friendly when it comes to working with it.

Dyneema Rope: Knife, tape, beeswax, fid.

Steel Wire Rope: Wire Cutters, Swaging tool or swageless fittings, storage space for ungainly coils of wire, and other foreseeable tools.

Rope just seems more serviceable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I guess we won't know the UV life expectancy until there is a definitive test. Or time shows what happens.
 

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I see how the rigging attaches to the chainplates, but what about attachment to the mast? Our boat has t-ball fittings which swage to the wire. I haven't seen any such fittings for synthetic. Also, it seems like one would have to keep wire for the forestay if using roller furling. Is that correct?

This is a very intersting and timely topic. Although it has has been addresed here several times in the past, just in the last year it seems like there have been additional advancements and more people actually making the switch.

I've heard that Brian Toss has said he plans to go to synthetic on his own boat (may have already done so). So where is Knothead to chime in on this?
Right here follow link

Brackets | Colligo Synthetic Systems | Colligo Marine
 

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UV issues turned us off using new synthetic materials to replace our 28 year-old (afaik) rod shrouds and stays. Chafe also rears its ugly head with synthetic fiber standing rigging, as it does in using it for lifelines. When the marketing people are TOUTING the fact that it can last as much as three years, it gives me pause. For me, going traditional should not have to include tarring the rigging to protect it from UV rays and possible sudden, unannounced failure. For an emergency short-term repair line makes some sense. As mentioned by various people in this thread, terminals can become a problem however. It's all a balancing act between what you need, what you want, and what works.
 

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I didn't see anything on the Colligo site for anything that will provide tensioning. Having to use a winch to provide tension on a halyard would be a real pain in terms of balancing my 3 shrouds per side.
 

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There really going to have to ZERO in on the UV lifetime for example the PBO guys are pushing it at 3 years


There is know way its cheeper when you look at the TOTAL cost and shorter life cycle


As far as easy to replace if it fails i have not seen to many masts live through and upper shroud failure without and act of massive good luck

Dynex Dux is made form Dyneema SK-75 material, which is widely known as the best synthetic for UV resistance. Now, quantitatively, we are saying 3-5 years minimum, uncovered, in the sun and it will probably be more than 5 years. Cover it and it will last much longer. At the same time, our researh vessel in the Sea of Cortez, has shrouds on it that we are removing and pull testing every year to develop a characteristic of UV damage (April 09 will be 2 years). This will begin to be published in May or June on the Website. A study of SK-75 (base material of Dynex Dux) was completed by the Univ of Aukland that basically showed the material experiences some UV damage and then becomes relatively opaque to UV and the rate of damage diminishes.

Costs: We have found that initial costs are within about 10% of the cost of 1x19 wire mostly because costly turnbuckles do not have to be replaced when using lashings. Over time it becomes even cheaper because you do not have to replace the hardware, only the line.

We strongly believe Dynex Dux and the other coming heat stretched 12 strand Dyneema alternatives are the value leader in Synthetic standing rigging. Size it for stretch and creep and it will be so overdeisgned for strength, it ussually is more than twice the strength of the wire it replaces. This type of standing rigging is very conducive to the Do it yourselfer and really deserves a look.

We have now rigged boats from Beach cats to 55 foot schooners and catamarans.

Please let me know if you have any other questions

John Franta, Colligo Marine
 

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Dynex Dux is made form Dyneema SK-75 material, which is widely known as the best synthetic for UV resistance. Now, quantitatively, we are saying 3-5 years minimum, uncovered, in the sun and it will probably be more than 5 years. Cover it and it will last much longer. At the same time, our researh vessel in the Sea of Cortez, has shrouds on it that we are removing and pull testing every year to develop a characteristic of UV damage (April 09 will be 2 years). This will begin to be published in May or June on the Website. A study of SK-75 (base material of Dynex Dux) was completed by the Univ of Aukland that basically showed the material experiences some UV damage and then becomes relatively opaque to UV and the rate of damage diminishes.

Costs: We have found that initial costs are within about 10% of the cost of 1x19 wire mostly because costly turnbuckles do not have to be replaced when using lashings. Over time it becomes even cheaper because you do not have to replace the hardware, only the line.

We strongly believe Dynex Dux and the other coming heat stretched 12 strand Dyneema alternatives are the value leader in Synthetic standing rigging. Size it for stretch and creep and it will be so overdeisgned for strength, it ussually is more than twice the strength of the wire it replaces. This type of standing rigging is very conducive to the Do it yourselfer and really deserves a look.

We have now rigged boats from Beach cats to 55 foot schooners and catamarans.

Please let me know if you have any other questions

John Franta, Colligo Marine


1. Can you explain how to safely tension in a little more in detail?

2. Also, a drawing or description of what is necessary for a full shroud replacement identifying part numbers and prices would be an excellent addition. To clarify, A picture showing the distributor, terminal end fittings, brackets and sizes for a particular line size. It would make it easier to order the correct parts and give a fast estimate of total cost.
 

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I do rigging often and usually the only part that is not recycled is the actual wire. We reuse the Sta-loks and turnbuckles. The average life span of a recreational sailboats rigging is 20 years. I fail to see where there is any significant savings. I do see however a larger probibility of failure due to chaff and UV damage, both which are absent with wire rigging.
 
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