SailNet Community banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1971 Tartan 30. The spinnaker pole so mounted on deck and right next to it is a short pole barely 1/4 length of the spinnaker pole. Does anyone know what it is used for?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
Never use mine, but it attaches to the mast and holds the guy out when using the spinnaker on a reach.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,485 Posts
Thanks for your reply! I am not sure how I would use a reaching strut. Any light you can ahead on the subject is appreciated!
When "reaching" with a spinnaker, the pole must be so far forward that the after-guy is nearly straight back, nearly parallel to the axis of the pole and so rendered nearly worthless. The reaching strut is attached to the mast and laid against the guy and pushed aft, perpendicular to the guy, forcing the guy out and away from the pole and making it more effective, in the same manner that a spreader holds a shroud away from a mast increasing the angle between the mast and shroud at the mast head.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
Like so:

 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,242 Posts
I've never seen a reaching strut used with a spin but it makes sense.
Not that I do a lot of spinnaker class racing.

I find it interesting that Harken's website showing how to set up a "cruising spinnaker" does not include a reaching strut. Harken
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
I find it interesting that Harken's website showing how to set up a "cruising spinnaker" does not include a reaching strut. Harken
A cruising chute will not have a loaded guy like a symmetrical, so there's no issue with a bad angle, nor the chafe on the shroud that is the other major item addressed by the strut.

That said, my Asymm tack line chafed badly when I used it through and under a spare bow roller so I'll have to rethink that plan...

But no need for a strut or pole of any kind with an Asymm unless you want to try to improve your DW angles with a regular Spinn pole. The strut wasn't necessary until the pole was approaching the forestay.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,485 Posts
Note that in this photo, the reaching strut is up-side down. The long side of the outboard jaw, with the parrots beak end, should be on top of the guy, to hold the pole in place on the guy if the guy comes free of the sheave.

Note also the crewman/woman securing the strut to the shroud. This is a good idea provided there is chafe protection on the pole to protect both the pole and the shroud, and, provided the material used for the restraint can "break away". For that we use a length of Velcro one-wrap.

FWIW...
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,242 Posts
Note that in this photo, the reaching strut is up-side down. The long side of the outboard jaw, with the parrots beak end, should be on top of the guy, to hold the pole in place on the guy if the guy comes free of the sheave.

FWIW...
I guess the upside down strut has the fellow in the yellow foulies upset as he seems to be doing a bit of a frustration dance (or perhaps he has to pee)!

I get that a cruising chute or Asym sail of any kind would not need a reaching strut, which is only useful with a symmetrical spinnaker.

I still find it interesting that Harken does not show a reaching strut. I guess they assume that all cruising spinnakers are asymmetrical.

My faith in the marine sailing hardware companies remains undaunted though as I find that Forespar carries all the parts you could want for a reaching strut for nearly a boat buck: Sail Reaching Struts
It wouldn't be worthy of the label "marine grade" if the $1000 price tag wasn't for < $500 worth of parts.
Since I rarely fly the symmetrical spin on our boat I may just try to make one out of recycled parts from h'cane Sandy.
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,096 Posts
You dont see many reaching struts nowadays. First the symmetric spinnaker has fallen out of popularity, most racing is done with asyms. Secondly use a set to tweakers provide the same benefit as the reaching strut without the hardware and hassle. When set, the tweaker pulls the aftguy out and down to the rail and is a commonly used solution. http://www.harken.com/content.aspx?id=3913

Put the strut on Ebay.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,485 Posts
You dont see many reaching struts nowadays. First the symmetric spinnaker has fallen out of popularity, most racing is done with asyms. Secondly use a set to tweakers provide the same benefit as the reaching strut without the hardware and hassle. When set, the tweaker pulls the aftguy out and down to the rail and is a commonly used solution. Harken

Put the strut on Ebay.
Ah... Not quite. The reaching strut changes/increases the angle of the guy at the outboard end of the pole which reduces the amount of load needed to provide the transverse (or lateral) force vector at the pole end to control the pole's horizontal position. That dramatically reduces the imposed compression load on the spinnaker pole and mast at the point of connection of the pole. Again--the strut functions just like a spreader. To reduce compression loads. A "tweaker" merely changes the angle between the pole end and the guy turning block which is normally at or just aft of the beam max.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
Ah... Not quite. The reaching strut changes/increases the angle of the guy at the outboard end of the pole which reduces the amount of load needed to provide the transverse (or lateral) force vector at the pole end to control the pole's horizontal position. That dramatically reduces the imposed compression load on the spinnaker pole and mast at the point of connection of the pole. Again--the strut functions just like a spreader. To reduce compression loads. A "tweaker" merely changes the angle between the pole end and the guy turning block which is normally at or just aft of the beam max.
Agree that a strut acts like a spreader.. and overall is better than a twinger from a mechanical advantage point of view.. but the twings accomplish a strut's other function, which is to avoid the guy 'sawing' across the upper shroud on a high reach. Also, the 'downward' pull of the twinged guy should relieve some of the load on the pole downhaul at the same time.

If you have a strut and you're looking at a long run it's probably worth setting up.. for shorter legs a twinger may be more practical.

If you have a pole downhaul that is rooted at the mast base (fewer adjustments when the pole moves fore or aft) then twingers are near necessary to stabilize the pole end without the 'forward' pull of a deck mounted downhaul.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top