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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two boats on my shortlist a Tayana 37 and a Corbin 39 both have about the same engine hours and electronics and age of standing rigging. The Corbin has a quality interior. Any thought would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Was the Corbin factory or owner finished? Many of them were sold as hull & deck kits. Even if a master joiner bought a kit some of the non-woodwork aspects of the rest of the boat should be carefully inspected.

No real basis for what follows, but I'm betting the Tayana sails better....
 
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I looked at both in my search that ended with our Rafiki. Both are great sea boats. But what Faster says is true. Many Corbin's were finished by owners. This can be good, or not so good.

If you're looking for comparative differences, the Corbin is a modified fin with skeg hung rudder while the Tayana is a very traditional full keel. This would give the Corbin an edge in maneuverability, while the Tayana will track better. The Corbin is slightly larger in LOA and beam. I assume this would give it more storage space. I've never sailed either, but they appear to have similar SA/Disp. Sailing characteristics would likely be similar, but sailing them would be important.

I'd also compare deck layout, side-deck size, and tankage. What about rigs; are they both cutters? Are the engines in equal condition. You mention hours, but what about state of maintenance? I assume they are both quality diesels.

Ignore electronics. I'd be more focused on other basic equipment. What do the galleys look like? Heads? Winches and windlass? Anchoring system (anchors, rode, rollers, storage, etc.). Do either have self-steering fitted?

The nice thing is that either boat would likely be fine (assuming they are in equally good condition).
 

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Loved my Inlaws Ty. Sailed easily (if somewhat slow). Actually not that hard with reduced crew if set up with correctly. Would go for this if similar in other ways for reasons already stated.
 

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If I had to choose I think I would go with the Corbin, assuming the interior was well done (factory or skilled amateur). Seems like a bigger boat that would be better at most things related to extended cruising. Why is your short list down to these two. Seems like there are better choices out there in this size range. What about a Hood 38?
 
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Between the two, the Corbin is the 'better performer' with a PHRF @ 150; the Ty37 @ 174. This would translate, on paper, to a 15% better elapsed time for the Corbin. Both boats have symmetric hulls, thus you can sail one over onto its beam ends and not feel any change in helm (I race ILYA scows, so that's what I want a boat to do). My Ty37 regularly beat Corbins in PHRF club racing.
"numbers comparisons": http://tomdove.com/sailcalc/sailcalc.html

I agree with Killarney, as both these designs are now nearing 40 years of age. If not impeccably maintained (leaks, etc.) both will probably have severe ROT in bulkheads, deck, and other interior structure.

Ty-37:
The chainplate knees are vulnerable to rot. The interior wood work of the Ty is mostly solid teak straking so if there was a bad leak and the softwood underlayment has rotted, it is possible to rebuild/restore to original exceptionally high original quality; ditto with screwed down teak decks. Look for a Ty with an OEM varnished interior, most oiled interiors by now have gone over to the 'dark side' and would be a gigantic and long term heartache to restore. The Ty has LOTS of built-in stowage and LOTS of interior handholds for safety.
The OEM rigging of the Ty could be characterized as 'dangerous' - screwed together toggle bolt ends instead of forged; but, should have been entirely replaced by this time.
The Ty is quite 'top heavy' and prone to have quite large roll period (my preference). I would think a lighter weight multi-spreader mast would make such a boat become a much better performer. There seems to be a yard execution error in that the mast is probably set 18-20" too far aft - a problem that can easily cause a heavy helm if the sailmaker isnt aware of this design fault and then 'correctly' designs the point of maximum draft well forward and with a less full draft and a flatter 'luff entry' shape in the mainsail (so that the main halyard doesnt have to be overstressed to accomplish good helm balance); once achieved the helm will be VERY light.
Ive had a Ty for 15 years (approx. 60-70K miles). I used to race it PHRF, and if the hull is faired and the bottom paint is babies-ass smooth, the leading edges are 'corrected', a feathering prop applied, the sails set/'shaped' correctly (+ the staysail flying from a clubfoot!!!) .... it will sail MUCH MUCH better than its PHRF ... probably closer to an actual 160-165 PHRF (a real 'sleeper' for PHRF club racing - got the pewter to prove it.).

If I had to replace my Ty, Id search out another impeccably maintained one; but, there's many many Ty37 'beaters' out there. Ive sailed quite a few Corbins; but, my preference/bias would still lead me towards another well kept Ty ........ but, there's a LOT of better more modern boats out there. I'd also tend to favor a 'Perry design' for a replacement.

http://i1086.photobucket.com/albums/j449/svAquila/HT1.jpg
http://i1086.photobucket.com/albums/j449/svAquila/Aquila300DPI-corrected2.jpg
http://i1086.photobucket.com/albums/j449/svAquila/Aquila3.jpg

Hope this helps.
 

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Between the two, the Corbin is the 'better performer' with a PHRF @ 150; the Ty37 @ 174. This would translate, on paper, to a 15% better elapsed time for the Corbin.
Something looks funny with the math here. My understanding of PHRF is that a rating difference of 24 equates to a difference in elapsed time over a 1 nautical mile course of 24 seconds.

The typical sailboat travels a nautical mile in, very roughly, 10 minutes. A 15% change in elapsed time would equate to approximately 90 seconds.

That's a pretty big difference. Getting 15% equal to a rating difference of 24 would require typical boat speed to be closer to 22 knots (!). Am I missing something?
 

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.. how does 15% faster than six knots get you to 22??
 

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I believe hotdogs point was this:

For a 24 second difference per mile to equal a 15% increase in speed, assume the following equation (SPM = seconds per mile):

SPM + 24 = 1.15*SPM

Or, more similar to Rich's equation: ((SPM + 24) / SPM) - 1 = 0.15

Solve for SPM and you get 160, or 22.5knts.

(to get to rich's 16%, it would be 150: the rating of the faster boat. i.e. Rich's equation makes the false assumption that the faster boat's rating is the speed at which it travels 1 mile. Either that or he meant that the one boat has a rating that is 16% better than the other boat... not that it is 16% faster - not that its elapsed time would be 16% lower).

Rich's equation, using just the 174 and 150 numbers, does not take into account that a boat rated 0 does not do 1 miles in 0 seconds (and boats with negative ratings do not arrive before they left), so the speed increase should be calculated as such (where SPM_0 is the seconds per mile of a zero rated boat):

((SPM_0 + 174) / (SPM_0 + 150)) - 1

If you were to assume, as hotdog did, that the 0 rated boat goes 6 kts (and thus takes 10 minutes, or 600 seconds to travel 1 nautical mile), the increase in speed should be:

(600 + 174) / (600 + 150) - 1 = 0.032 = 3.2%

I have no idea what the appropriate 0 rated speed is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If I had to choose I think I would go with the Corbin, assuming the interior was well done (factory or skilled amateur). Seems like a bigger boat that would be better at most things related to extended cruising. Why is your short list down to these two. Seems like there are better choices out there in this size range. What about a Hood 38?
Thanks,

These two are on my short list due to location and my budget. I am looking a poor man blue water boat in SE Asia. I live in Asia.

Todd
 
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