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I'd rather be sailing....
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124 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been boat shopping, found two that speak to me- an 84 Tayana Vancouver 42 and a 87 PS 37. Yes, I know they're totally different boats, but I'm looking for an off shore capable cruiser that the admiral can be comfortable in.

What can you tell me about how these boats sail and handle? (Mostly sailing short handed)

Order of magnitude difference in maintenance between a 42 and 37? (Tayanna has teak decks that need to be replaced within the next 5 years or so, but it is about 15k less)

What about exterior vs interior chain plates? (Pros and cons)

Both boats have Perkins engines with about 1200 hours on them, otherwise similarly equipped.

Thanks
 

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794 Posts
Old teak decks can be a big problem if water has entered the core through the fittings. Out Tayana 55 is 30 years old and 5 years ago we took up the teak and relaid it as the original teak was 10mm and there was still 6mm left. We used a 2 inch hole saw to core the outer skin of the deck in several places and the balsa was pristine!

The job was done in Cartagena Columbia, took 5 weeks and the total bill including labor and 100 tubes of Silaflex was $3,800 but if you wanted new teak you would need a new mortgage.

It speaks highly for the workmanship of the Tayana Yard but I would want reassurance that the balsa core, if that is how the 42 was built, is sound.

Our chain plates are internal and the internal turnbuckles were originally 'home made' in Taiwan and had to be replaced. The were very under engineered!

Good luck Phil
 

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Friends of mine had a teak deck replaced on a Tayana 42 for 8K in Thailand a year or so ago. There is a you tube video on it. Google it as I can't remember the title.
 

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Crealock 37
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676 Posts
I have a Crealock 37 that my wife and I cruise in. I generally single-hand while the Admiral enjoys the view. The boat is easy to handle and performs quite well. On the last sail of this season a friend and I were tacking out of the bay with 12-16 knots true wind, boat speed was 6.5 to 7.5 knots and about 50 degrees off the true wind.

Good tankage (mine has the 2nd fuel tank) and storage. There is space that can be used for water makers, etc if desired.

The quarter berth is really only a single, we use it for storage. With guests aboard we use the settee which makes into a double and were comfortable with 4 adults aboard.

Getting around on deck is okay, port side is a bit tight foot room wise due to the furler line blocks along the stanchions and it is a bit tight getting around the running backstays if used.

I like the cutter sail plan. With our usual 18-20 knots I use a reefed main with staysail only to tack out of the bay getting about 5 knots boat speed while keeping heel angle down around 10 degrees (spelled that happy Admiral).

Build quality is excellent. The longer I have Elnora and the more I explore/work on her the better I like the design. The boat was obviously designed and built by people who have experience with boats both building them and sailing on them.

Here's a video of some single-handed tacking.
 
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