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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today I started the BIG job of replacing my teak decks on my 1981 Cheoy Lee ketch. I just did a small section of the cockpit near my port jibsheet winch. I'm using this post as a guide. It took four hours from getting my tools out until the area is mostly clean.

The first step was removing the winch and two cleats from on top of the deck.


Here's the deck before removing the deck hardware.


They're off now. Then it was on to the wrecking bar and mallet to pry up the old teak. The screw heads stayed behind, so I used a flat tip screwdriver and vice grip pliers remove all the screws.

Next I scraped off the black bedding compound that held the teak in place. Most of it came up easily using a Fein Multimaster scraper tool.


Next I used acetone and a rag to remove the residual bedding compound. I wore nitrile gloves, but the acetone ate through them so tomorrow I'll be getting better chemical protective gloves. I switched to using a scotchbrite green scrubber with acetone and that helped the gunk come up quicker.

At the end I wiped down the surface and drilled out the hardware mounting holes, then reamed them out using a dremel tool. I'll rebed all the hardware later using this guide.


Now the deck is clear and is ready for the individual screw holes to be reamed and the holes to be filled with epoxy.

We have guests coming August 10 so my goal is to have the decks done by then. I guess I need to get to work!
 

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Asleep at the wheel
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3,017 Posts
Wow, that's going to be a job! And I really hate to see the teak decks go; I love that look. But I can understand why you're getting rid of them.

So, what are you doing with all the teak? :)
 

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Senior Member
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19,489 Posts
I doubt very much of the decking came up in reusable pieces.

It's a daunting job, looks like you got off to a good start. SNer jrd22 did the same on his new-to-him boat, seems a good way to put that particular worry to rest.
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I got a few long pieces up, but the underside had all the black sticky sealant so it's going in the marina dumpster.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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3,217 Posts
the teak does not look that bad... just tired of cleaning and oiling it?
 

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Asleep at the wheel
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3,017 Posts
N8, I'd bet some resourceful people would love that wood. Teak is expensive, and a trip through a properly set-up bandsaw would take off the sealant and probably still leave most of the wood. If you weren't on the other side of the country from me, I'd be tempted t make a deal. I have several projects that could benefit from long pieces.
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The decks have worn thin with screwheads showing through and getting caught on shoes and toes. The nonskid properties get negated when the decks become a trip hazard.
 

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Irrationally Exuberant
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1,402 Posts
And I suspect the OP was concerned about potential leaks through all those screw holes.
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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3,971 Posts
Goodonya for starting this daunting task! Never having to worry about a rotten core, and the tremendous job/expense that entails, makes the work removing the teak and glassing over seem minor (when you're done with it :)).
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yesterday my wife and I removed more deck hardware and teak. Now we have both sides of the cockpit cleared. Today we're having friends come over and they'll help remove the teak from the seats in the cockpit. Here's my first big challenge. With the teak removed there will be a lip and I'll need to decide if I'll remove that edge and fair it, or fill the space previously occupied by the teak.

Here are a few pictures from yesterday's hard work.


THe holes are all drilled out, vacuumed and filled. Some of the screw holes just kept sucking the epoxy. It's not dripping inside the cabin so there must have been a gap in the hull between the gel coat and the fiberglass, especially on the starboard side outboard.


The starboard side prepped. To remove the old sealant I used a paint scraper attachment with my drill to expedite the process.


Durabak nonskid coating samples. Top to bottom the colors are Tan, Creme and Sand. We're planning on using Sand because it compliments the wood trim the best. The nonskid is UV protected polyurethane so I can use the same primer that I'll use for the edges
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Got most of the cockpit teak and hardware removed today. Tomorrow I'll be cleaning up all the stuff we removed today.


Transom shot


Great help today from Jaime, Natalie and Eric! Tomorrow I hope to fill a lot of new screw holes.
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Got the teak all off the cockpit and lots of screw holes filled with epoxy. Now it's just what to do with the quarterdeck area. The deck feels solid, but my moisture meter says it's wet. I'm letting it dry out and will see if the wood still stays solid.
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks. I'm making a trip to WestMarine to get some more epoxy and fairing filler. Then I'll be working on the deck above the transom and quarterdeck. My next big issue will be working with the coaming that's left around the cockpit from where I removed the teak. I need to make a decision of whether to lay balsa and epoxy it down and glass over, or to cut the coaming down and fair smooth. It looks like I may need to get an angle grinder.
 

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Commodore
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
OK, more pictures and a status update.


My dock neighbor, Jay from JAYGAR is on the right helping scrape off the sticky tar stuff, while I'm on the left with my head down out of the frame removing bedding compound. So far I've used three different methods to remove the sticky stuff and the easiest one was using a paint or varnish scraper. The other less successful methods were using a Scotchbright green scrubbing pad with acetone and using a paint removal wheel.


This is a repost of a picture of the cockpit taken while standing on my dockbox showing how white and nice the cockpit looks after scraping the sticky teak bedding compound off and cleaning the area with acetone.


Here is my next problem. After removing the teak there's a half inch lip or coaming in the cockpit that I need to deal with. My first instinct is to cut it off with my Fein multimaster or a sawzall and then smooth it and fair with epoxy fairing compound, but before I make the fist cut I want to see if anyone out there in sailnet land has experience with this.
 

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Registered
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9 Posts
How about keeping the lip and using it to help retain some cushions? Perhaps, you can file some drainage slots in. Or, keep some strategically placed lips to do the same and grind off the rest...
 

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One of None
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8,045 Posts
You can scupper the lip. (notch it) so water drains and you will have a lip for cushions too!
 
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