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I recently switched from varnishing the teak toerails to oiling them.

Unfortunately, I didn't notice that some of the teak oil splashed onto the fiberglass, and a couple of days of baking sun later I've got a very stained deck.

Any thoughts on a good product that might whiten up the decking again, or am I in for a round of sanding and re-gelcoating?

Thanks!
 

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I am going with oxalic acid, test in an area that is less obvious first. Be sure to rinse very well, be sure to re-wax after. I have heard that "Barkeepers Friend" is a possibility as well?

I think I am deciding to go from oiling to varnishing the toe rail, just the opposite from your decision. I seem to be unable to find an oil that just seems to collect dirt, jet exhaust (near PDX), mold (Pac NW), and it just gets gummed up and I don't like the look or maintenance. I would have to clean, brighten, and re oil almost 4-6 weeks to really keep it up...
Greg
 

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One of the ingredients in "Barkeepers Friend" is oxalic acid. You can confirm this by reading their MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). Make sure the entire deck is kept wet and rinse well. Per its design, its good at removing oil and wax. I used it to brighten my teak after a thorough soaking and washing with Oxyclean. The Oxyclean did a great job killing the mold on the teak. I chose these products because they had good recommendations on the web, and I had them in the house.

I used Watco teak oil finish with good results. I followed the instructions closely and didn't have any problem with it collecting dirt. It's held up well on the Chesapeake Bay near the Patuxent River Naval Air Station, but after four months, it looks like its time to clean and reapply.

If you're cleaning the teak on the boat, make sure to keep everything around the teak wet while cleaning, rinse well, and allow it to dry well before applying the finish of you choice.
 

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Don Radcliffe
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If the deck is gelcoat, first wash with boat soap, then try the 3M fiberglass cleaner/wax. It works quite well with oily deposits such as diesel exhaust stains.
 

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I am going with oxalic acid, test in an area that is less obvious first. Be sure to rinse very well, be sure to re-wax after. I have heard that "Barkeepers Friend" is a possibility as well?
I would stay away from Oxalic Acid. Oxalic Acid will degrade anodized aluminum's resistance to corrosion and dull both gelcoat and paint.

You can try mineral spirits, but teak oil stains are very hard to remove. I'd be ready to touch-up paint
 

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To remove teak oil from gelcoat ... use a strong caustic detergent such as TriSodiumPhosphate (TSP) or any caustic teak cleaner (dont get it on any teak unless you want to re-oil). Buy TSP in a paint or hardware store


BTW - to make teak oil last entire year/season mix 3 parts oil and 1 part oil based varnish, apply thick, dont wipe, let cure. Several coats are required. You can also buy this as "resinated teak oil" - "Nuteak by MaryKate". Such also removes easily by 'soaking' with TSP, etc.
 

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I would stay away from Oxalic Acid. Oxalic Acid will degrade anodized aluminum's resistance to corrosion and dull both gelcoat and paint.

You can try mineral spirits, but teak oil stains are very hard to remove. I'd be ready to touch-up paint
Good to point out the acid eating away at the alumimium for sure be cautious about that. Again, copious rinsing is critical. Also, do not get Oxalic Acid in your eyes!

As for just painting, I am ready to use Soft Scrub and Oxalic Acid in a precision approach followed by waxing and suffer the dulling effect before painting. Save that for later.

I think you can get some elbow grease involved with compound and get the wax on and be in good shape.
Greg
 
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