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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a broken lifeline stanchion that needs to be repaired, but getting to the stanchion is kindof a challenge. I need a temporary fix until we can spend the time to get the whole thing off for replacement.

Any advice? I'm not expecting it to be back to it's original strength, just strong enough to not bend under pressure.
 

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We have a broken lifeline stanchion that needs to be repaired, but getting to the stanchion is kindof a challenge. I need a temporary fix until we can spend the time to get the whole thing off for replacement.

Any advice? I'm not expecting it to be back to it's original strength, just strong enough to not bend under pressure.
Without a picture or description....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Without a picture or description....
Yea, I'm sure that'd help.

I don't have a photo. The stanchion is cracked/broken about halfway up the tubing, between the base and the top of the stanchion. The stanchion base is fine, the crack is about 12-16in off the base of the stanchion and well below the top of the lifeline ring.
 

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How about a length of 5/8 re bar or pipe and a bunch of hose clamps.If it's strong enough to save you ugly doesn't matter. Wrap it with duct tape. If they don't find you handsome at least they'll think you're handy.
 

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Yea, I'm sure that'd help.

I don't have a photo. The stanchion is cracked/broken about halfway up the tubing, between the base and the top of the stanchion. The stanchion base is fine, the crack is about 12-16in off the base of the stanchion and well below the top of the lifeline ring.
Sounds like 'fill and freeze' damage? Hard to imagine any other way that could happen...

If it's a longitudinal crack I'd just tape it up for now.. if it's cracked around and literally broken you might be able to splint it temporarily with another piece of tubing split lengthwise and wrapped in place.
 

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If you can pull the top bracket off, slip a piece of bar down inside of the broken stanchion post. Re-bar or some sort of rod, Might even be able to slip a wooden dowel down inside, possibly a broom handle.
 

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if it is a standard stanchion, then just buy a new one and replace it. I don't see doing a hack repair job and having a family member going overboard. Besides that it sounds like the correct fix would take less time, effort and brain strain than a "quick repair" job. Sometimes it is better to just do it once. I know I have gone the temporary route many times and normally it ends up costing more and way more time, because you end up doing the job twice or more times.
 

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Absolutely agree with Miatapaul. A new stanchion is $35 from Garhauer. It's hard to imagine access to a stanchion as being "kind of challenge".
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The stanchion is split horizontally, not vertically. I think someone ran it into something, but I really have no clue how it was so badly damaged.

I like the idea of trying to get something down the center of it, I'll have to look at it and see if that'll work.

Absolutely agree with Miatapaul. A new stanchion is $35 from Garhauer. It's hard to imagine access to a stanchion as being "kind of challenge".
The interior is built out in such a way that the interior lining covers the back of the stanchion completely, so I'd have to start pulling the interior apart to get to the backing. Saying it's a challenge is an understatement :) It's probably a day or two of work just to get to the back of it.

I completely agree with replacement, I'm just looking for a short term fix to get the boat home.
 

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You say this stanchion has a split, but is not broken in two. So you can't put a sleeve inside it, and you can't put a sleeve on the outside without dropping the lifelines which presumably you don't want to do.

Which leaves...first aid is the same for a stanchion as it is for a boom or a broken leg. Get a couple of 2' long pieces of double-wall black iron pipe, 3/8"-5/8" exterior thick. That should be cheap and simple from any plumbing or hardware store. Fit 2-4 of them alongside the stanchion as best you can, as splints. If you can't get the pipe, get rebar, or threaded rod stock similar size which is usually available in 2-4' lengths. And a hacksaw with metal or carbide blade to cut it. Secure them all in place with an excess of tie wraps, or fiberglass strapping tape, or hose clamps.

And whatever it is, it is. That's a kludge job to get you home again, should cost less than $20, might be half of that.

If your stanchions really extend down inside the hull and they are not just through-bolted to the deck? Doesn't sound standard, might be way more than Garhauer's are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You say this stanchion has a split, but is not broken in two. So you can't put a sleeve inside it, and you can't put a sleeve on the outside without dropping the lifelines which presumably you don't want to do.

Which leaves...first aid is the same for a stanchion as it is for a boom or a broken leg. Get a couple of 2' long pieces of double-wall black iron pipe, 3/8"-5/8" exterior thick. That should be cheap and simple from any plumbing or hardware store. Fit 2-4 of them alongside the stanchion as best you can, as splints. Secure them all in place with an excess of tie wraps, or fiberglass strapping tape, or hose clamps.

And whatever it is, it is. That's a kludge job to get you home again, should cost less than $20, might be half of that.

If your stanchions really extend down inside the hull and they are not just through-bolted to the deck? Doesn't sound standard, might be way more than Garhauer's are.
They are standard stanchions, they come down through the deck and bolt to a backing plate beneath the deck. In most areas of the boat, they are fairly easy to access, it's just this one (of course...) is in a place that's behind some pieces of wood interior.

I could cut the stanchion in half at the point it is broken, then separate the two halfs for a sleeve. I wasn't able to find a sleeve with the correct OD (1in) and that was long enough (it needs to be ~ 3-4in long) to provide support, though.
 

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So the stanchion and the base are one piece?
 

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"They are standard stanchions, they come down through the deck and"
Might be clearer if you could post a URL to a similar stanchion.

I think I'm not the only one who considers the standard stanchion design to be one that does not penetrate the deck in any way, other than the stanchion base being through-bolted. No penetration, just through-bolting on the base.

If you've got something else, it may be standard for some maker, but it doesn't sound like what 90% of the recreational sailboats out there are fitted with. (Which isn't great, but simply is what it is.)

If you want to cut the stanchion in half and insert a pliug inside, then you can get an ash or oak staircase bannister, or 1" dowel, and just whittle it down. For a "standard" stanchion, that would have to be tapered anyhow.
 

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Is your stanchion welded to the base? Sorry for the farkatke design. I had assumed that you could just remove the stanchion from the base.
 

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So the stanchion and the base are one piece?
That is how mine were made. This was pretty common on race boats built ouside the U.S. in the late 1970's and early 1980's Its a bit of PIA, but at least I can get to the bolts on mine. I really don't think that sleeving is a good option but even if it was, the sleeve would need to be a lot more than 4-5".

I would think you would want the sleeve as close to full length of the stanchion. as you could get since the sheer load is close to the same all the way down the stanchion while the moment increases linearly as you get near the base.

Jeff
 
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For a temporary fix...that is what was asked, I would take a pipe cutter or hacksaw and cut the stanchion at the break. Then get a galvanized electrical conduit that will just slide over the stanchion tube. Make the pipe as long as possible, from the base to just under the top cable. You will have to disconnect the life line to do this. Now drill one hole 2" down from the top and 2" up from the bottom and nut and bolt 1/4x20 in each hole. This will be almost as strong as the original unbroken stanchion.

A tube (cylinder) is one of the strongest structures. A solid reinforcing rod will bend easy and wood dowel will break easy.
 

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It would be good a and easy if you had access to a metal shop in area that could cut 1" ID tubing length-wise so you can attach them around the Stantion with hose clamps. Plumbing supply house know of such a shop?

Tod
 

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Seems you have plenty of advice on how to splint the stanchion. The project just reminds me of a common revelation. Many times, when faced with digging into the nooks and crannies of the boat, I look at what will need to be removed in awe of the upcoming job. Seems the whole side of the boat will have to come off. When I get into it, I learn that one little piece or one interior cabinet and I have access to the single bolt back there. Hopefully, it isn't as hard as it looks. I know many manufacturers don't give enough consideration to maintenance access, but tightening stanchions would be pretty basic stuff.

Good luck.

p.s. one part stanchions are a real PITA, for exactly this reason.
 
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