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Montgomery 17
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384 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I am boat shopping, how exciting.

My Watkins 29 has been up for sale for about a month and I just recenetly put it on the Sailing Texas website. The day after that, I recieved a call from a local looking for a sailboat and he took a look at mine and liked it. So he came back to the boat last Monday and we went through it and he erally liked what he found. Then we went out sailing for about 3 and a half hours and we both really enjoyed ourselves.

I am hoping that he will purchase the boat so that I can move a little bit.

Anyways, I started looking at boats and my favorite is one I have been eyeing for a while, a Beneteau 265. But my mother and girlfriend say they don't want smaller boat and I understand so we started looking at the "larger" Beneteau 281. Then I started looking at the specs......

The Bene 265 has: LOA: 26'5", LWL: 24'2", Beam: 9'5".

Then, the Bene 281 has: LOA: 28' 6", LWL: 24' 3", Beam: 9' 5".

I found that to be a little odd. (These messurements are from the ads on YachtWorld.com)

The only real difference is the LOA of +1' 11" correct? Well does that just mean that the transom is a little longer? Or that the 281 could have a more pointed bow? What is the difference?

I am mainly interested in the difference of cabin size. Could it be that the beam in the 281 is carried farther forward or aft? Something like that?

Thanks everyone!
 

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According to the beneteau owners.com website, the 265 has considerably less ballast and lower displacement:

265:

ballast: 1450
displacement: 4800

281:
ballast:1676
displacement: 5732

However, interestingly, their respective sail areas are not that different; the 265 has 330 sq. ft, and the 281 has 341.

Someone with more time and knowledge than I could take those numbers and tell you what their respective ratios mean in terms of sailing performance and stability.
 

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Montgomery 17
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384 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks mstern. You are right though, I bet it does effect the sailing characteristics. Also, if you noticed, the 265 has a draft 2" deeper....

I am really wanting to know the difference in the cabin more than the sailing characteristics though. I should have clarified that in the initial post, I think I will do that.....
 

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Looking at YW pictures, the layouts seem pretty similar, esp aft. The V berth/settee arrangements seem a little different, and apparently both models were made into the '90s. So if you can get yourself on board each of them perhaps you'll get a better feel, esp if your primary interest is liveability over sailing performance.

Sometimes the extra couple of feet is all cockpit (that in itself can be a distinct advantage) sometimes it's just a bit more elbow room below.
 

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My understanding is that the 281 is a cruising series boat, whereas the 265 belongs to the First racer/cruiser series. If you are looking for a sportier boat, it might make more sense to compare the First 265 with the First 285. If you are looking for a newer cruising boat with more amenities, then the 281 would likely be the better choice.

I have spent a fair bit of time aboard 285s, and they are a lot of boat for the money. If you get interested in them let me know as there are some variations and problem areas to be aware of.
 

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Montgomery 17
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384 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks John, great information.

I wonder when you say amenities, would that mean that the factory just built the extra amenities into the boat? So the hull and all is really pretty much the same?
 

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<TABLE height=302><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE class=listings cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD><TD>The First 265 was created by naval architect Jean Marie Finot and has established a new benchmark in the sailboat industry. Design criteria included performance, interior volume and ease of handling.

Builder: Beneteau Designer: Groupe Finot
Dimensions
LOA: 26'5 LWL: 24'2 Beam: 9'5
Displacement: 4,800 lbs Draft: 4'2 Ballast: 1,450 lbs
Engines
Engine(s): Volvo Penta Engine(s) HP: 12 Engine Model: 2001R
Hours 235
Fuel: 8.25 gallons Water: 16.25 gallons Holding: Yes


<TABLE style="MARGIN-LEFT: auto; WIDTH: 100%; MARGIN-RIGHT: auto; TEXT-ALIGN: left" cellSpacing=5 cellPadding=0 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: middle; WIDTH: 23%">The Oceanis 281, boasts all the attributes of this larger cousins...Confort, Volume, Stability, and of course, Performance. All Beneteau are built to the highest boat building standards to ensure safety and longevity, and a sound investment for you. The Oceanis 281...your dream has arrived. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE style="WIDTH: 100%; TEXT-ALIGN: left" cellSpacing=2 cellPadding=2 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: top">Specifications</TD><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; WIDTH: 25%"></TD><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; WIDTH: 25%"></TD></TR><TR><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: top" colSpan=2><TABLE style="TEXT-ALIGN: left" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: top">LOA : 28' 6"
LWL : 24' 3"
Beam : 9' 5"
Mast length (over water) : 38' 8"
Draft (standard) : 4' 00"
Ballast (standard) : 1,675 lbs.
Displacement : 5,732 lbs.
Engine : 18 hp.
Fuel Capacity : 8 gal.
Water Capacity : 50 gal.
Hull / Designer : Groupe Finot
Sail Area : 383 sq. ft.
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
 

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Thanks John, great information.

I wonder when you say amenities, would that mean that the factory just built the extra amenities into the boat? So the hull and all is really pretty much the same?
No, I'm pretty sure the hulls of the 285 and 281 are completely different. The 285 was designed very much with club racing in mind. It has a nice, tunable (bendy) rig with plenty of lines to pull. Not to say you couldn't, but I don't think racing was part of the 281 design brief.

The 285 has most everything you need for basic coastal/vacation cruising, but I think you'd find the 281 is better suited with more tankage, storage, etc. It is a more voluminous hull.
 

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228 Posts
<table style="width: 100%; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: left;" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"><tbody><tr><td style="height: 15px; vertical-align: middle; width: 28%; text-align: center;">Oceanis 281 '95 </td> <td colspan="1" rowspan="2" style="vertical-align: middle; text-align: center;"> <table width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody><tr> <td align="center">
</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center">
</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center">
</td> </tr> </tbody></table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="vertical-align: middle; width: 23%;"> The Oceanis 281, boasts all the attributes of this larger cousins...Confort, Volume, Stability, and of course, Performance. All Beneteau are built to the highest boat building standards to ensure safety and longevity, and a sound investment for you. The Oceanis 281...your dream has arrived. </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table style="width: 100%; text-align: left;" border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="2"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="vertical-align: top;"> Specifications</td> <td style="width: 25%; vertical-align: top;"> Rig Dimensions</td> <td style="vertical-align: top; width: 25%;"> Documentation</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" rowspan="1" style="vertical-align: top;"> <table style="text-align: left;" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="vertical-align: top;">LOA : 28' 6"
LWL : 24' 3"
Beam : 9' 5"
Mast length (over water) : 38' 8"
Draft (standard) : 4' 00"
Ballast (standard) : 1,675 lbs.
Displacement : 5,732 lbs.
Engine : 18 hp.
Fuel Capacity : 8 gal.
Water Capacity : 50 gal.
Hull / Designer : Groupe Finot
Sail Area : 383 sq. ft. </td> <td style="vertical-align: top;">
Classic Mast / Furler
I= 33.33 ft / 33.33 ft
J = 10.07 ft / 10.07 ft
P = 29.53 ft / 29.53 ft
E = 11.35 ft / 11.35 ft
</td></tr></tbody></table>
</td> <td style="vertical-align: top; width: 25%;"> » Equip. list (pdf)
» Performance

» Specifications (pdf)

</td></tr></tbody></table>
 

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228 Posts
1992 Beneteau First 265

<!-- End Page Title --> <!-- Start Page Content --> <table height="302"> <tbody><tr> <td valign="top">
</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
<table class="listings" width="100%" cellpadding="4" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td>
</td><td> The First 265 was created by naval architect Jean Marie Finot and has established a new benchmark in the sailboat industry. Design criteria included performance, interior volume and ease of handling.

Builder: Beneteau Designer: Groupe Finot
Dimensions
LOA: 26'5 LWL: 24'2 Beam: 9'5
Displacement: 4,800 lbs Draft: 4'2 Ballast: 1,450 lbs
Engines
Engine(s): Volvo Penta Engine(s) HP: 12 Engine Model: 2001R
Hours 235
Fuel: 8.25 gallons Water: 16.25 gallons Holding: Yes


Accommodations
Standard 1992 Beneteau First 265 interior (see attached drawing)
Green cushions
Dinette table
(6) Opening ports
Opening hatch
Interior is ducted with air conditioning, including the head
Interior woodwork is in excellent condition
Marine head with shower



Galley
Single sink
Icebox
No stove
Storage



Electronics
Speed
Depth
Tiller pilot
Stereo with cockpit speakers



Electrical
12v system
110v system
Battery charger
30amp shore power cord
Batteries



Sails & Rigging
Main Dacron Sobstad
Genoa Dacron Sobstad with green uv cover
155% Genoa Sobstad in very good condition
Cruising Spinnaker w/ATN Snuffer in very good condition
Harken roller furling
Windex
Lazy Jacks
Lewmar #16 self tailing winches
(6) Line clutches
Mainsheet traveler
Manual vang
Manual backstay
Controls lines led aft to the cockpit



Deck & Hull
Hull color is white
Deck color is white
Canvas: is green and in good condition
Bimini, tiller, comp hatch and genoa uv cover
Cockpit locker
Swim platform
Swim ladder
Exterior wood is varnished & in very good condition
Double lifelines with bow & stern pulpits
Deck stepped single spreader mast
Anchor locker
The bottom was painted in 5/2005 and several blisters were repaired.



Mechanical
Mermaid air conditioning with condensation valve (keeps water out of the bilge)
Inboard diesel
Manual bilge pump
Tiller steering
Manual head with both direct overboard & discharge

</td></tr></tbody></table>
 

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Welshwind,

It's curious, but the profile drawing of the 281 in your post #12 does not look anything like any 281 I've ever seen. I think your source may have mixed up some of their drawings!:confused:

P.S. Wow, I now see your source is Beneteau, but I still think there's a mix-up.
 

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Montgomery 17
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384 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I think a big question would be: Are the hull shapes the same? I really am wondering if the interior volume is the same......

If it is, I could cahnge a few things to make the boat more of a cruiser if I chose to get a 265.

Thanks again.
 

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"IF" you want a cruiser, get the oceanus series. If you want a racer that can cruise, then look at the boats in the first series. To my knowledge, a first and an oceanus of the same size, are NOT the same hull.

If you were to look at Jeanneaus on the other hand, the Sun Odysseus and Sun Fast share the same hull and deck, but the SO models have a shorter mast, shallower keels, smaller winches, usually 3 vs 4 even 6 on some of the larger SF versions. SF's are the race version, the SO's are for the cruisers. Also many of the SF's have lead vs iron in the keel.

For me, I personally would not look at an Oceanus Bene. A first series, in a half a heart beat! or less.

For me if I could afford on, a first 36.7 would be the cats meow for size and how it works from Beneteau.

marty
 

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Hey John,

I am replying to an old post but I would like any more info you would like to sheare on the Beneteau 281&285.
I am currently looking to purchase and would like to hear the 'skinny'
 

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Freedom isn't free
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bump... for this thread.

The first 285 looks pretty ripe, the O281 looks to be the same exact boat as the 285 (hull)... didn't look at sail area (am figuring it's less). What I find fascinating is the 285 used in the 80s are going for roughly the same price as the O281 from the 90s... that seems odd (even looking at NADA values)... Perhaps the First series has higher value?

Also the OP from many moons ago, compared the First 265 to the O281, how about a comparison between the First 265 and the First 285?

I'd like to ditch my Capri 25, and get something still decently fast, but with some cruiser-esque amenities (a stand up adult head would be great)... I'm pretty particular, and the 285 is on my hot list... I want something that is trailerable twice a year (don't tell me I can't cause I am doing it now with a 4ft fin keel)... deck stepped mast, wheel steering (not sure why I want it, but I do)... inboard, and prefer a traveler in the cockpit. Finding a 285 with wheel steering and traveler in the cockpit is rare, most are on the coach roof (I've found a few with it on the companionway threshold, which is more common on the tiller model).

Anyway, I want a boat that I can easily single hand, and if the 285 is too much, then maybe the 265 is correct, but it seems like too small a leap from my 25 footer with a 9' 2" beam. If I have to deal with a 9.5' wide boat on a trailer, it seems to me that a 28 footer would be more bang for the $$ than a 26.

I have a 3500 diesel dually tow vehicle, so that's not an issue. Stupid steep ramp for launching on our home lake, and I've proven I can raise a pretty significant deck stepped mast with the rig I've made (used on one of our other 28 footers on the lake).

So if you know of issues with the 265 or 285 I'd like to hear them...
the Steel keel is an obvious one... the poor drainage for the shower floor is also a given. Anything else?
 

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Windseeker
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I can easily singlehand my 36.7 with the roller furler on. Currently working on learning to fly the symmetrical spinnaker as well. Next up double handing. When I bought the boat 18months ago I was unsure how this would work out but so far so good. Obviously not a direct comparison but my general point is I'm no great shakes as a sailor and managed the jump to a more complex boat. I'm also still having a lot of fun learning how to sail her as that ability to tune the rig both at the dock and on the water adds a whole new dimension.
 
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