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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys finish the end of genny/jib sheets? I want to order some new sheets but it occurred to me that I don;t know how to have them finished...
 

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"Nevis Nice"
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Just whip it!

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Whip It, Whip It Good.

Whip both Ends.

To improve the life of your Genny and Main sheets, switch which end is the knot to the sail and which is the free end. So this year, tie one end of the sheet to the sail and the other end is for the winch. Next year, the free end becomes the knot and the knot the free end.

DrB
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Whip both Ends.

To improve the life of your Genny and Main sheets, switch which end is the knot to the sail and which is the free end. So this year, tie one end of the sheet to the sail and the other end is for the winch. Next year, the free end becomes the knot and the knot the free end.

DrB
Great tip thanks! I always tie a stopper knot in the end of the sheet though, just in case.
 

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Did you 2 plan that sequence together?

Whip both Ends.

To improve the life of your Genny and Main sheets, switch which end is the knot to the sail and which is the free end. So this year, tie one end of the sheet to the sail and the other end is for the winch. Next year, the free end becomes the knot and the knot the free end.

DrB
Whip it good.

:D :D
 

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I whip the ends, along with a small middle whip so I can tell easy where to tie the larkshead as Charlie does.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was thinking about the larkshead arrangement actually. It seems it has the advantage of the bowlins net being able to hang up on shrouds and the baby stay. Any down side to that?
 

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Just whip it!

<object width="425" height="344">


<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/YMq9KdOtSJ0&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></object>

This video is a good illustration of what should more accurately be called a temporary whipping. This whipping is fine for most modern lines that can be melted. And what they are calling method two is the one I usually use. However, a proper needle whipping should be performed on line that can't be melted like kevlar or many of the other high tech lines. Or in the rare event that you get your hands on some hemp or sisal. The advantage of a needle whipping is that even if some of the round turns chafe through, the whipping stays in place because of the frapping turns. Usually giving you enough warning and opportunity to attend to a new whipping before it lets the end fray.

The Sailmaker's Whipping
 

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I was thinking about the larkshead arrangement actually. It seems it has the advantage of the bowlins net being able to hang up on shrouds and the baby stay. Any down side to that?

In my opinion, there is no reason, when purchasing a new genoa sheet to cut it into two pieces. Use a larks head in the middle of the line until such a time arises that the sheets are ready to be end-for-ended. Then cut the line at the larkshead, whip the ends, turn the line around and then tie your bowlines.
 

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Also fewer snags with the larks head than 2 bowlines.

In my opinion, there is no reason, when purchasing a new genoa sheet to cut it into two pieces. Use a larks head in the middle of the line until such a time arises that the sheets are ready to be end-for-ended. Then cut the line at the larkshead, whip the ends, turn the line around and then tie your bowlines.
11111
 

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On the stopper knot, I no longer put one in on the jib sheets. We sail a lake and gusts at the wrong time have put us in jeopardy of the shore, so I want to be able to blow the jenny.
 

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Telstar 28
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Another option is the French whipping, which doesn't require a needle, but unlike some of the other whippings shown previously, uses a half-hitch in most of the round turns, and if it frays, the round turns are less likely to break free...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I thought with synthetic line there were ways to seal the ends without wipping, that's not true?
 

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Yes, you can try melting the line, or using liquid line whipping... but you're generally best off with a proper whipping IMHO. Melting the end of the line can come apart.

I thought with synthetic line there were ways to seal the ends without wipping, that's not true?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes, you can try melting the line, or using liquid line whipping... but you're generally best off with a proper whipping IMHO. Melting the end of the line can come apart.
I have melted lines many times and the melted part usually does break... It was the liquid stuff I was thinking of. But I see that for about $5.00 per end most vendors will do the whipping for me. I had planned to get two sheets but i think you folks all saved me $10.00 ;) I'll try using just one long line and seeing how I like that solution.

For a 30 foot boat, one long line would be about 80 feet, yes?
 

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My genoa sheets are about 60-70' IIRC. Asymetric sheets are 90'. My 110/storm jib sheets are about 50'. With a new way of running my 155 sheets, I could probably cut 10' off my current sheet size. I have one of my sheets in the back seat of the truck, when I move it off the street, I'll pull it out and measure via hand to hand arm width and let you know. My boat is 30', simlar to yours with a mini forestay, so you need a bit longer sheet to get around from one side to the other.

Whipping the ends is easy! I have not had too much luck whipping loops, but the ends are easy! Get a stiff needle, even a thicker hand sewing needle works, sometimes better than the proper whipping needles you get at WM or equal. Slightly smaller diam, so they go thru the line easier. You just need something with an eye big enough for the whipping line to go thru. Get a book on knots, and it had different whipping knots and techniques.

marty
 

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The sheet in the back seat of the truck is 60', that is more than ample for my rig!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The sheet in the back seat of the truck is 60', that is more than ample for my rig!
Thanks very much! Thats shorter (read, cheaper) than I expected. As you pointed out, I'll add a bit to account for the baby stay. My biggest head sail is a 155% I believe, what's yours?

UPDATE: never mind, i see that was in your prior post, thanks again!
 
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