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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Our club is less money than a membership next door at the local boat yard. About 2k per year.

States own the submerged land to the 3nm line (since 1953 or so) and each State decides how to manage their own submerged lands. Each State will have different management approaches.

Maine is a bit different than other States in that riparian owners own to mean low water (0.0' tide mark) or to 1650', from mean high water, if your property is on extensive mud flats. These laws go all the way back to the mid 1600's and have been upheld more than once by the ME Supreme Court..

Our neighborhood has been through these legal battles before. One such incident was when the town demanded we allow them to put a dock on our property. The town lost as they would have had to prove eminent domain need (which they could not) and if they could have, they would have had to pay for all that land and the depreciation for every home in the neighborhood, a cost which would have paid off every mortgage in the neighborhood, and was way to much money for the small gain to the town. These laws/ME history are how we have a "deeded" mooring and a private beach. Other States have different laws. Our rules come from hundreds of years ago being one of the oldest settled places in the country, the Province of ME, in the early 1600's. Some of these laws occurred well before we were even part of MA and have been part of Maine's history since the 1600's...

In Maine, the State leaves submerged land management to the towns. This is typically through what is called submerged land lease for docks, mooring fields etc... Our mooring field is controlled by the town of Falmouth, legally, under ME State law. Most towns have a submerged lands lease from the State, a waterfront ordinance, harbor master, waterfront committee, mooring fees and mooring regulations to further manage their submerged lands lease. So, in short, it is not always "public land" in the way most assume it is. The town, at least here in most of Maine, manages the submerged lands and makes the rules for their submerged lands. Even though the State technically owns the land, to 3nm, the State allows the towns to fully manage these submerged waters, by law.
I do realize this is a byzantine maze of local, country, state and federal agencies to navigate through.

I think we need a poll about this with questions such as:

How far is your boat moored or docked from where you live?
5-10 minutes​
30 minutes​
1 hour​
2 hrs​
other​
Does the location where your boat is moored have adequate parking
free​
paid​
permit only​

Do you rent a
slip​
mooring​
private dock​

Do you own a
mooring​
slip (condo)​
private dock?​

Are you a member of a yacht club which provides a
mooring w/ launch services​
slip​
dinghy dock​
launching slip​

If you own a dinghy where do you store it?
on deck​
in water tied to boat​
on davits​
dinghy dock​
at home and launch for use​
How much to do pay for each sailing season for:
getting to and from your boat per trip (gas & tolls)​
less than $10​
$10 - $25​
$25 - $50​
parking​
$0 - $25​
$25 - $100​
$100 - $500​
mooring​
$0 - $25​
$25 - $100​
$100 - $500​
$500 - $1,000​
$1,000 - $2,000​
docking​
$0 - $25​
$25 - $100​
$100 - $500​
$500 - $1,000​
$1,000 - $2,000​
$2,000 - $3,000​
launch services including tips​
$0 - $25​
$25 - $100​
$100 - $500​
$500 - $1,000​
$1,000 - $2,000​
yacht club membership dues and required restaurant spending including tips​
$0 - $100​
$100 - $500​
$500 - $1,000​
$1,000 - $2,000​

 

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.....

5. Getting to shore from the harbor aside from the launch means you use your own dinghy or motor the mother ship to the town or fuel dock if a spot is available. Your boat won't be welcomed at a fuel dock unless you are buying fuel. You may be able to take on water when the dock is not busy with paying customers or in the evening when the fuel dock is closed, but the water spigot is not shut. Town dock tie ups are often occupied by boats arriving for a weekend stay... and you'd be lucky to find an available spot. The dinghy option means there must be a public/town dinghy dock - tie up. These can get massively over crowded (Newport, BI) and it's almost impossible to land your dink. Some places charge for dinghy tie up. There may be a beaching option but a something to tie / lock the dink too is a problem. And there is the tide range which can leave you stranded or wading through mud if you are ashore for a long time. Getting supplies to a beached dink is no picnic either.

6. Even getting a seasonal mooring can be a problem as moorings are only available to "town residents"... and you have to own, set, maintain and retrieve the mooring. You might find a mooring service who will sell all these services on a seasonal basis. Don't expect them to provide launch services

...
FWIW in Massachusetts towns manage the mooring areas but the moorings are available to anyone, not just to town residents. Most towns run a waiting list for moorings, and those lists can be quite long, but many are not. For example the waiting list in Marblehead Harbor may be 20 plus years, whereas the waiting list for the Marblehead side of Salem Harbor ( termed locally as the "westside" is perhaps four years.

Joining a club can be a means around the local harbor waiting lists, if the club is located in a residential area where there are no public marine businesses. Unless you own a backyard dock, the club launch may be the only means to access the adjoining mooring areas, so mooring spots are generally available to new members, because the general public otherwise cannot get to those moorings.

So if you were to today join Winthrop YC (where I expect there is no waiting list), tomorrow you would have a sheltered mooring in Boston Harbor, with parking and launch service, for something in the ballpark of $1,000. You pay for and own the mooring gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
I paid $2,100 for a seasonal mooring (anyone can rent) w/ launch service in Northport a few years ago. Park is first come, first serve and it literally impossible to find parking in Northport, let alone close to the docks. Dinghy docks for residents only and they have a wait list for that too. Drive was 50+ mi each way in LI traffic w w/ tolls... YUK
This year I have a 30 minute drive.. little traffic, no tolls... close, free parking, a great lip costing $3,800 for the season
 

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Wow, y’all are making me even happier to be a country boy. Up here in upstate NY we pay a whopping $100 a year for a town mooring on Lake Ontario. There is a waiting list but I know there’s at least one mooring near us that only needs a diver to retrieve the chain (or the tackle replaced) that’s been empty for 6 years.

We drive 1 hour to get to the boat, plenty of parking. We pay $150/year for dinghy dockage and $900 a year for winter storage. Pretty sweet deal that allows for a bigger boat budget, plus we’re only a few hours sail from the 1000 islands so that not too shabby.

Plus there’s this whole other country across the lake you can sail too. Their money is weird colors and the say ‘A’ a lot, they put gravy on their french fries and pineapple on pizza, but overall it’s pretty nice.

The downside is the season is really only 5 months long in a good year, and the beginning and end of the season can be pretty cold.


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