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On my last boat, I had two line slab reefing. It worked fine, but I wanted to "upgrade" to a one line system. It was a relatively small boat (O'day 23), so all of the lines ran outside the boom, making the project an easy one. To my surprise, the system didn't work as smoothly as I thought it would. Because of friction, I often had to give a yank on the reefing line at the clew to bring the aft end of the sail down to the boom. I thought this was probably because of the design and position of the blocks I put in rather than a systemic problem. In short, my own fault. In retrospect, I now think differently.

When I bought my "new" boat, it too had a one line reefing system. On this larger boat (Catalina 28), the reefing line runs through the boom (just like a big-boy boat). I was initially surprised to find that I have to do the same thing at the clew with this boat: the friction in the system requires help for the clew to be tensioned. That means giving the line at the aft reef point a good, hard yank down in order to get enough slack in the line to pull the line through the boom. Just too much friction.

I'm going to see if there is a way to make this easier; if not, I may just revert to a two line system. I'd leave the tack end the way it is, with the line leading back to the cockpit. But I may just install a new cheek block and cleat on the aft end of the boom to handle the clew.
My Catalina 250 had a similar one-line system. I found that putting a block at the aft cringle greatly reduced the friction at the very spot where it was needed. The block had a shackle that reached through to a ring on the other side.

I then tried a similar block at the tack, but it caused more harm than good. In order to get sufficient clew tension, the tack grommet would pull below the boom and ruin sail shape. Jockeying halyard tension to compensate while underway was more hassle than I wanted. Just running reefing line through that cringle forces it down to (not below) the boom, then I can get going without worrying and adjust halyard tension independently.

I’ve been meaning to modify my current Catalina 34 in the same way, but having difficulty finding a big enough block that doesn’t cost a fortune. I stop by the consignment shop periodically.
 
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That has me considering possible scenarios. For example, husband and wife out sailing. Husband is the more experienced sailor, wife, not as much. (A very common situation, at least in my circles). Something happens to husband; he goes overboard,

Another scenario...what if the main rips? Can it still furl? How hard is it to pull a sail out of the furling system at sea when the sail is flogging?
In a MOB situation, I have no plans to take down the sails, and when doing my COI tests with the USCG on an 80' 3 mas6ted schooner, even with crew, you do not have time to do so, or your allotted time has gone to that.
As long as the luff tape doesn't rip, an unlikely scenario as it is inside the mast, an IMRF sail comes down or furls just as any R\F jib would, but in our case the foil is round.
But I wouldn't advise any couple to sail beyond the range of Sea Tow/TowBoatus, if both parties can't handle the sails, and in this case, heave-to the boat, until there is time to bring them down or roll them up, whichever system one has on the boat.
 

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My Catalina 250 had a similar one-line system. I found that putting a block at the aft cringle greatly reduced the friction at the very spot where it was needed. The block had a shackle that reached through to a ring on the other side.

I then tried a similar block at the tack, but it caused more harm than good. In order to get sufficient clew tension, the tack grommet would pull below the boom and ruin sail shape. Jockeying halyard tension to compensate while underway was more hassle than I wanted. Just running reefing line through that cringle forces it down to (not below) the boom, then I can get going without worrying and adjust halyard tension independently.

I’ve been meaning to modify my current Catalina 34 in the same way, but having difficulty finding a big enough block that doesn’t cost a fortune. I stop by the consignment shop periodically.
My Jeanneau 39 has single line reefing built into the Selden boom, and it works beautifully. On my setup the first reef is on one side of the sail, and the 2nd reef on the other. Rather than the lines passing through a grommet in the sail to the other side they go through a cheek block attached to the sail and back down the same side. That seems to have solved the friction problem you guys are talking about.


And before anyone says it, I KNOW the sail looks like crap! That pick was taken before the sail went into the sailmaker for a recut and full battens conversion!
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OK so this one seems a bit contentious and I'm really curious what folks around here think.
I've read that furling mains can be dangerous as if they jam they cannot be dropped. Unless you get furling not in the mast but on the beam, then it can be dropped. Also I've read that sails are quite a bit more expensive and must be replaced more often or else they don't roll up nicely.

On the other hand, some have said they are very reliable and almost never present troubles. On person told he he would not single hand without one as conditions in The Netherlands are quite variable and it allows for such speedy and easy reefing.

Personally I have passed on a number of potentially good boats simply because of the added complexity, fears of maintenance costs, and uncertainty about one jamming up on me.

Really curious to hear people's thoughts on this topic and whether a boat with a furling main would be more or less attractive to them as a buyer, especially if one was single handing.
My boat has in the mast furling and can't imagine sailing without. Very easy to manage the sail and reefing is of course unlimited. I feel the hassle of the sail getting stuck and having to work it free is much easier than going on deck to reef vs sitting in the cockpit. When stuck, I move the boom over to the other side and work the furling line/outhaul back and forth. I am sure it would be a nightmare if it truly got stuck but will take the chance...
 

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I have a Selden IMF on my Hunter 326. Everything is manual, with the outhaul and a continuous furing line. The first time I took the (16-year-old) boat out, the main was stuck in the mast. Rather than fight it outside the harbor I motored back to the slip.

The next calm day I was able to incrementally work the sail to get it fully unfurled. Then I proceeded to furl the sail per Selden's instructions (stbd tack, counter-clockwise), keeping tension on the outhaul. The main furled tightly inside the mast and I haven't had any problems since...

I wasn't shopping fir an IMF boat, but when I found a boat in the condition I wanted it happened to have an IMF so I bought it. The reduced performane wasn't an issue for me and I can handle the boat without leaving the cockpit.
 

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My Catalina 250 had a similar one-line system. I found that putting a block at the aft cringle greatly reduced the friction at the very spot where it was needed. The block had a shackle that reached through to a ring on the other side.

I then tried a similar block at the tack, but it caused more harm than good. In order to get sufficient clew tension, the tack grommet would pull below the boom and ruin sail shape. Jockeying halyard tension to compensate while underway was more hassle than I wanted. Just running reefing line through that cringle forces it down to (not below) the boom, then I can get going without worrying and adjust halyard tension independently.

I’ve been meaning to modify my current Catalina 34 in the same way, but having difficulty finding a big enough block that doesn’t cost a fortune. I stop by the consignment shop periodically.
Sound like a good idea. I'll put a new block on the list of spring projects.
 

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On my single line setup the reefing line terminates at the tack. The only block is at the clew. I think the smooth operation is a credit to the Selden boom. There is some magic going on in there that is not totally clear to me!


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I get the feeling that at least some of the friction in my system is in the boom itself; I'm going to do my best to see if I can figure that out and address it. But I remember how much of a difference it made on my old boat to add a block at the tack reef point, so I'm going to give that a try at the clew and maybe the tack too on this boat before I go the double-line route.
 

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Friction is an enemy. It makes raising and dropping ANY sail more difficult. Anything that moves... a sheave... a car on a track will suffer from friction.
There are some advantages to furling mains... but those advantages come with downsides. In my mind the disadvantages out weigh the advantages... But each sailor will do their own calculus.
2 line slab reefing is almost fail safe
full battens make for better sail shape and little to no flopping of the leach
slides can be changed to those with less friction easily
powered winches can assist in raising the main.
Furling main mechanisms are expensive
 

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OK so this one seems a bit contentious and I'm really curious what folks around here think.
I've read that furling mains can be dangerous as if they jam they cannot be dropped. Unless you get furling not in the mast but on the beam, then it can be dropped. Also I've read that sails are quite a bit more expensive and must be replaced more often or else they don't roll up nicely.

On the other hand, some have said they are very reliable and almost never present troubles. On person told he he would not single hand without one as conditions in The Netherlands are quite variable and it allows for such speedy and easy reefing.

Personally I have passed on a number of potentially good boats simply because of the added complexity, fears of maintenance costs, and uncertainty about one jamming up on me.

Really curious to hear people's thoughts on this topic and whether a boat with a furling main would be more or less attractive to them as a buyer, especially if one was single handing.
It probably depends on which furling main system you have. Also who made the sails. And then there is maintenance but it’s pretty basic on a good system. That said, I’m replacing my 32 year old Hood inmast system with a Southern Spars in boom system. I will end up with more sail area on a shorter mast allowing me to go inside from Chesapeake to SC on delivery. And as a retired racer, the shape of the sail without battens was frustrating.
 

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On a boat less than about 40' I don't see any need for the expense and complication of either in boom or in mast furling and since I believe you are looking at boats in the mid 30's range, I would just go with slab reefing. JeffH mentioned 2 line reefing (one line at leech and one line at luff), I prefer to just have one line at the leech that's led forward to a cleat on the front of the boom, with just a hook or shackle to secure the reefed tack. That requires me to walk forward to the mast but once there allows me to control everything. If you prefer to remain in the cockpit you can add the second line at the luff. But it increases the amount of spaghetti so I prefer to keep it all up at the mast.

As a read through this thread there are a lot of comments regarding in mast or in boom reefing that begin with "once when I chartered" or "I heard from a rigger, etc," and I would urge you to completely ignore all of those comments. It's like someone saying they fell off a bike and skinned their knee the first time they tried to ride one so bikes are obviously unsafe, or a Tour de France competitor dissing a particular derailleur system that would be perfectly fine for any recreational rider. Also, I would take 'some' of JeffH's comments with a pretty big grain of salt because he is primarily a relatively small boat racer and is way more into performance than most cruisers are who sail bigger and heavier boats. For example, he may have concerns about the head of his in mast sail creeping slightly downward as the day goes on and that affecting the draft of his sail, but for you and most other cruisers, though factually correct, that is a completely inconsequential consideration and only serves to clutter up the mind of someone like yourself who is new to this and is trying to figure out what priorities make the most sense to you. So, keep in mind that he's a smart guy with lots of useful information in his head, his perspective is different from yours will be as a cruiser. But I do agree with his overall opinion that nothing beats a hanked on sail when it comes to sail shape and simplicity.

In concept, in boom furlers seem to be a superior solution because they allow you to have roach and better control of sail shape than in mast, but not quite as much control as traditional hanked on sails. But as a cruiser, they certainly offer enough control and shape to do a great job for you. But for me, I can't make the numbers work well enough to convince me to buy one. If I didn't have in mast type, I'd just got with hanked on, particularly on a boat under 40'. Which brings us to in mast systems. Yes, they increase weight aloft and it's something else that could break and sail shape isn't even close to what a hanked on or in boom furling sail allows. But it's a huge convenience and safety factor to be able to reduce or increase sail while underway without having to come up into the wind, all while sitting in the cockpit, and since you're not a racer, the additional weight aloft won't be noticeable at all, even a little bit. In mast furlers almost never jam while furling the sail so lots of the fears some people have are unfounded. Usually, if they jamb, it's because the sail was furled too loosely and as you try to pull it back out, the rolled sail rubs against the inside of the mast and bunches up just inside the slot in the mast. So, worst case, you can't get as much sail unfurled as you would like, not exactly a safety issue, but you probably can furl it back in while making sure you are holding good tension on it and there's a good chance that alone will cure your jammed sail. My current system is sort of an oddball, discontinued by Profurl, behind the mast furler that has five 'C' shaped claws behind the mast that simulates the inside of the mast with the foil running up the middle of them so the foil can't sag to leeward while underway. It's sort of ugly and when I got the boat, always having been a hanked on kind of guy, I intended to remove it and replace with a hanked on main ASAP. But it's grown on me so now I'm keeping it for as long as it lasts. When I first got the boat I managed to get the sail jammed about every other time I tried to unfurl the sail and was quite frustrated, but gradually I've learned the little tricks that make it a very convenient and reliable tool. For example, while furling my main, I need to have the main sheet somewhat loose, but keep at least some tension on the outhaul during furling. When unfurling, because of the shape of the 'claws', I have WAY better luck if on starboard tack than on port tack, and it's also important to keep the main sheet tight so the leach of my sail is held taut as it is pulled out of the claws. That's it. But anytime I did manage to jam it, I just furled it back in, while holding pressure on the outhaul and after a few minutes have always been able to clear the jam without going aloft. If you don't know those few little tricks, my system is a nightmare, but once you know them, it's reliable and easy to operate, and that is why I said to ignore the comments from folks who haven't taken the time to really get to know their furling system. Most riggers have racing oriented backgrounds so have the most experience with and prefer hanked on and tend to subscribe to unfounded fears of furling systems.

This will be heresy to some, but as a cruiser, how much time to you plan to spend beating to windward? I think the answer most honest cruisers would give is "as little as possible." Yes, it's fun to do sometimes and of course sometimes it's necessary to get off a lee shore, but most cruisers don't do a lot of it and since beating to windward is when superior shape really helps, as a cruiser, how much of a liability is the lack of roach in your mainsail? When reaching or running, especially in winds over about 15 knots I don't think there's much disadvantage to having a roachless furling main, and though there's no doubt that a full batten, 'roachy' main will allow better performance while beating, especially in light air, if you pay attention to even an in mast furled main, you can still beat to weather very adequately in most wind conditions. So, how much sense does it make to highly prioritize great sail shape as a cruiser when the only time it makes much difference is at certain wind speeds while beating to weather, which you try to avoid doing anyway? So, while an under 40' boat like you are considering doesn't need any kind of roller furling main, I wouldn't rule out a boat that has it. But just like almost everything else about your boat, plan to take the necessary time to learn about and make friends with whatever furling/reefing system it has.
 

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In fairness, one true nightmare regarding in mast systems I recently heard about was from a couple moored next to my boat last August. Theirs was a beautiful, relatively new 50 footer with in mast furling but they had managed to get one of their wire rope running back stays rapped up in their furled sail and couldn't get it to unfurl at all. Not a safety issue because their sail was fully furled but I can't imagine how to solve that problem other than to cut the runner and pull it out of the furled sail vertically. Not sure how they finally resolved it. I made a mental note to always ensure my lazy runner doesn't have too much slack in it when furling my main.....
 

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In fairness, one true nightmare regarding in mast systems I recently heard about was from a couple moored next to my boat last August. Theirs was a beautiful, relatively new 50 footer with in mast furling but they had managed to get one of their wire rope running back stays rapped up in their furled sail and couldn't get it to unfurl at all. Not a safety issue because their sail was fully furled but I can't imagine how to solve that problem other than to cut the runner and pull it out of the furled sail vertically. Not sure how they finally resolved it. I made a mental note to always ensure my lazy runner doesn't have too much slack in it when furling my main.....
What kind of modern 50 footer has running backstays and an in mast furler?

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On a boat less than about 40' I don't see any need for the expense and complication of either in boom or in mast furling and since I believe you are looking at boats in the mid 30's range, I would just go with slab reefing. JeffH mentioned 2 line reefing (one line at leech and one line at luff), I prefer to just have one line at the leech that's led forward to a cleat on the front of the boom, with just a hook or shackle to secure the reefed tack. That requires me to walk forward to the mast but once there allows me to control everything. If you prefer to remain in the cockpit you can add the second line at the luff. But it increases the amount of spaghetti so I prefer to keep it all up at the mast.

As a read through this thread there are a lot of comments regarding in mast or in boom reefing that begin with "once when I chartered" or "I heard from a rigger, etc," and I would urge you to completely ignore all of those comments. It's like someone saying they fell off a bike and skinned their knee the first time they tried to ride one so bikes are obviously unsafe, or a Tour de France competitor dissing a particular derailleur system that would be perfectly fine for any recreational rider. Also, I would take 'some' of JeffH's comments with a pretty big grain of salt because he is primarily a relatively small boat racer and is way more into performance than most cruisers are who sail bigger and heavier boats. For example, he may have concerns about the head of his in mast sail creeping slightly downward as the day goes on and that affecting the draft of his sail, but for you and most other cruisers, though factually correct, that is a completely inconsequential consideration and only serves to clutter up the mind of someone like yourself who is new to this and is trying to figure out what priorities make the most sense to you. So, keep in mind that he's a smart guy with lots of useful information in his head, his perspective is different from yours will be as a cruiser. But I do agree with his overall opinion that nothing beats a hanked on sail when it comes to sail shape and simplicity.

In concept, in boom furlers seem to be a superior solution because they allow you to have roach and better control of sail shape than in mast, but not quite as much control as traditional hanked on sails. But as a cruiser, they certainly offer enough control and shape to do a great job for you. But for me, I can't make the numbers work well enough to convince me to buy one. If I didn't have in mast type, I'd just got with hanked on, particularly on a boat under 40'. Which brings us to in mast systems. Yes, they increase weight aloft and it's something else that could break and sail shape isn't even close to what a hanked on or in boom furling sail allows. But it's a huge convenience and safety factor to be able to reduce or increase sail while underway without having to come up into the wind, all while sitting in the cockpit, and since you're not a racer, the additional weight aloft won't be noticeable at all, even a little bit. In mast furlers almost never jam while furling the sail so lots of the fears some people have are unfounded. Usually, if they jamb, it's because the sail was furled too loosely and as you try to pull it back out, the rolled sail rubs against the inside of the mast and bunches up just inside the slot in the mast. So, worst case, you can't get as much sail unfurled as you would like, not exactly a safety issue, but you probably can furl it back in while making sure you are holding good tension on it and there's a good chance that alone will cure your jammed sail. My current system is sort of an oddball, discontinued by Profurl, behind the mast furler that has five 'C' shaped claws behind the mast that simulates the inside of the mast with the foil running up the middle of them so the foil can't sag to leeward while underway. It's sort of ugly and when I got the boat, always having been a hanked on kind of guy, I intended to remove it and replace with a hanked on main ASAP. But it's grown on me so now I'm keeping it for as long as it lasts. When I first got the boat I managed to get the sail jammed about every other time I tried to unfurl the sail and was quite frustrated, but gradually I've learned the little tricks that make it a very convenient and reliable tool. For example, while furling my main, I need to have the main sheet somewhat loose, but keep at least some tension on the outhaul during furling. When unfurling, because of the shape of the 'claws', I have WAY better luck if on starboard tack than on port tack, and it's also important to keep the main sheet tight so the leach of my sail is held taut as it is pulled out of the claws. That's it. But anytime I did manage to jam it, I just furled it back in, while holding pressure on the outhaul and after a few minutes have always been able to clear the jam without going aloft. If you don't know those few little tricks, my system is a nightmare, but once you know them, it's reliable and easy to operate, and that is why I said to ignore the comments from folks who haven't taken the time to really get to know their furling system. Most riggers have racing oriented backgrounds so have the most experience with and prefer hanked on and tend to subscribe to unfounded fears of furling systems.

This will be heresy to some, but as a cruiser, how much time to you plan to spend beating to windward? I think the answer most honest cruisers would give is "as little as possible." Yes, it's fun to do sometimes and of course sometimes it's necessary to get off a lee shore, but most cruisers don't do a lot of it and since beating to windward is when superior shape really helps, as a cruiser, how much of a liability is the lack of roach in your mainsail? When reaching or running, especially in winds over about 15 knots I don't think there's much disadvantage to having a roachless furling main, and though there's no doubt that a full batten, 'roachy' main will allow better performance while beating, especially in light air, if you pay attention to even an in mast furled main, you can still beat to weather very adequately in most wind conditions. So, how much sense does it make to highly prioritize great sail shape as a cruiser when the only time it makes much difference is at certain wind speeds while beating to weather, which you try to avoid doing anyway? So, while an under 40' boat like you are considering doesn't need any kind of roller furling main, I wouldn't rule out a boat that has it. But just like almost everything else about your boat, plan to take the necessary time to learn about and make friends with whatever furling/reefing system it has.
Just a couple of points:

Riggers are racing oriented? I would say racers make up a small percentage of a riggers business. Many racers do their own work. Their bread and butter is installing and repairing things like furling systems. They see far more of them than anyone else, so I would be a fool to ignore their advice and warnings.

While it has become abundantly clear to me over the years that many cruisers can't or won't sail upwind, some regions don't have the luxury of choosing not to do it. If you want to get where you are going you either sail upwind or motor, and motoring into wind and waves can be very unpleasant.

The idea that a cruiser won't notice the performance hits that come with the extra lofted weight and poor sail shape and tuneability doesn't mean those issues aren't real. Racers are aware of such things because they know what a big difference they make. Whether someone feels the convenience is worth that trade off is one thing, but they shouldn't be ignored or underestimated.



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What kind of modern 50 footer has running backstays and an in mast furler?

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A boat that has a storm jib or uses it's staysail in heavy winds. The runners oppose the jib stay and keep it taught.

Jeff
 

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A boat that has a storm jib or uses it's staysail in heavy winds. The runners oppose the jib stay and keep it taught.

Jeff
I thought running backstays were an old race boat thing. I have not seen a modern cruising boat with running backstays. It seems to fly in the face of modern thinking around simplifying rigs.

That is why I asked what modern boats use them.

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A boat that has a storm jib or uses it's staysail in heavy winds. The runners oppose the jib stay and keep it taught.

Jeff
I think you meant the running backs oppose the inner staysail forestay, not the jib.

However, on large rigs, the running backs can be used to hold the mast in column, if a big genoa is pumping the mast.
 

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Also, I would take 'some' of JeffH's comments with a pretty big grain of salt because he is primarily a relatively small boat racer and is way more into performance than most cruisers are who sail bigger and heavier boats. For example, he may have concerns about the head of his in mast sail creeping slightly downward as the day goes on and that affecting the draft of his sail, but for you and most other cruisers, though factually correct, that is a completely inconsequential consideration and only serves to clutter up the mind of someone like yourself who is new to this and is trying to figure out what priorities make the most sense to you. So, keep in mind that he's a smart guy with lots of useful information in his head, his perspective is different from yours will be as a cruiser. But I do agree with his overall opinion that nothing beats a hanked on sail when it comes to sail shape and simplicity.
I would take my comments with a big grain of salt if were vaguely true that I am primarily a small boat racer. But the reality is that I am primarily a cruiser on my Farr 38. I have delivered boats as big as the mid-40 foot range and spent lots of time sailing with my Dad's Brewer 12.8 and Mom's Endeavour 41.
So while I do race boats from 16 to 45 feet, I have a lot of time on bigger cruising boats.

As far as my experience, with in-boom furling, Dad's boat had in boom furling. While I understand that they have gotten better, that system worked so badly that the rigger and manufacture's rep went out with him to show him how to use it. They showed him the precise position that boom needed to be in and point of sail. Then they demonstrated how to use the system and proceeded to jambed it. Dad decided he needed a system he could count on and sold the main and boom, and went back to the conventional mainsail with a dutchman.

I helped deliver a 43 footer with an owner who had owned the boat for close to 10 years. The in-mast furler jambed when we went to take a deeper reach in 25 knots of wind. In fairness the Owner said that was only the second time that the furler jambed.

The late great Jon Eisberg had a hair raising story about an in-mast furler jamming on a Trinatella 43 in heavy air that he had over somewhere between 6,000 and 10,000 miles delivering back and forth between New England and the Caribbean.
But more to the point, my opinion is colored by discussions by sail makers and riggers who have had to repair jamb caused damages.

As to the creep of the sail over time adds draft to the sail causing more weather helm and more heeling especially on a heavy cruising boats because distance cruisers can spend days in a row reefed in a heavy air system.

And after a long periods of being partially reefed, the added draft from that creep makes the sail more prone to jamb when a deeper reef is needed. And that is significant because that deeper reef is more likely to be need to be reefed due to that added draft due to creep.

Lastly, once the sail creeps, it greatly point stresses the leech of the sail shortening the life of the sail.

In other words, my concerns are mostly not about performance but reliability and sail life for a cruising boat.

Jeff
 

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This will be heresy to some, but as a cruiser, how much time to you plan to spend beating to windward? I think the answer most honest cruisers would give is "as little as possible."
Here's the thing about cruising: it isn't all passage making. For sure, most cruising routes are off-wind, and most cruisers wait for weather to be favorable on passages. However, once in a cruising area, cruisers do a lot of daysailing or shorter overnight hops around the area. This is the same as any other day/weekend sailing in a place like the Chesapeake or New England, and there will be considerable upwind sailing.

Too much is made about "cruisers never sail to windward", and the only reason this is ever true is because they have bagged out sails or made sail/rigging choices that prevent them from doing so efficiently. Otherwise, one never fully explores an area and just sits in an anchorage waiting for the next down wind passage. Or just motors.

Mark
 

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Here's the thing about cruising: it isn't all passage making. For sure, most cruising routes are off-wind, and most cruisers wait for weather to be favorable on passages. However, once in a cruising area, cruisers do a lot of daysailing or shorter overnight hops around the area. This is the same as any other day/weekend sailing in a place like the Chesapeake or New England, and there will be considerable upwind sailing.

Too much is made about "cruisers never sail to windward", and the only reason this is ever true is because they have bagged out sails or made sail/rigging choices that prevent them from doing so efficiently. Otherwise, one never fully explores an area and just sits in an anchorage waiting for the next down wind passage. Or just motors.

Mark
Of course cruisers sail to weather when they are out having fun day sailing or not in a hurry but most cruisers motor or motor sail when on passage and faced with winds from directly where they’d like to go. My boat with a laminated roller furling main sails just fine going to weather when I want to so the additional half knot or couple degrees of pointing ability I might gain by having a full batten hanked on main isn’t as important to me as the convenience and infinite reefing from the cockpit ability that roller furling provides. Look around whatever harbor you’re currently in at center cockpit boats over 40’ and you’ll see that most have either in mast or in boom systems so I’m not the only one who thinks this way. Also, I’m more inclined to sail rather than motor than I was with my hanked on sails because it’s so easy and fast to press the button on the electric winch to unroll the sail with no sail cover to remove and I know I can so easily reef if the wind kicks up.


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