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Smack,
When we did the Pacific Cup last year the boat had to be compliant with the ISAF regulations for Category 1 as well as 36 pages of requirements from the race committee. We had to pass both a survey to get insurance and another comprehensive inspection by the race committee. It took us about a year of boat prep to accomplish compliance and we consulted directly with the boat’s designer, surveyor and sail loft. You can find the requirements on both the USSailing and Pacific Cup websites. We were told that the Hawaii trip would be the equivalent of ten years of hard racing in Northern California without the ability to refit or repair so we were advised to fix/replace anything that showed the slightest sign of degradiation. And they were right; we wore out an amazing amount of gear during those twelve days of racing. <O:p
 

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Smack,
Do you want to keep to check lists or do you want to morph over to "damage control"? From a DC point of view, bolt cutters are practically useless - they will just chew on cable and not make a swift cut. You want cable cutters (they have a notched cutting face) and on the boat you're considering, you want a pair with three foot handles. Cable cutters are much more effective if the cable is under tension (not always the case if the rig is down). You then need to resort to a carbide bladed hacksaw. Better still, pull the clevis pins. A pair of long handled radiator pliers works great as long as you don't bend the ends of your cotter pins into curly "Q"s. A big pair of diagonal cutters is helpful here too. Better still is using a single piece of monel or SS welding wire to "clip" the two turnbuckle bolts together. Much faster to pull a "clip" than a pair of cotters. I personally never have lost a rig (but I have broken a shroud and a stay before) and the above is from a good friend of mine who was on board a Santa Cruz 52 and an old IOR boat when they lost their rigs.
 

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Smack,
O.K., next question: Are you looking for a "test plan" of thinks to do/look out for on the shakedown sail or a check list of equipment/modifications? The later can be quite extensive and specific to your aspirations/risk tolerance/pocket book. The checklist I use is from the NORCAL OYRA and is pretty comprehensive. Is that what you are looking for? If folks are interested, I can try to repost it here.

<O:pThis is the testing we did in preparation for the Pacific Cup: A 400NM and 700NM test of the SSB and also tested the Sailmail connection by downloading GRIB files. We did "hose tests" on all the hatches as well as a "bucket test" on the engine access hatch. We measured all electrical loads and constructed an energy management plan to forecast recharging schedules. We deployed the emergency tiller as well as deploying the emergency rudder in under 5 minutes and executed a 360 turn in under two minutes. We simulated a life raft deployment in under 90 seconds (it was a valise that we carried in the cabin). All helmsmen had to do two successful COB pickups under sail (one from windward and the other from a spinnaker run). Three quarters of us held current safety at sea and first aid certificates. We deployed the Jordan Drogue, storm jib (on a removable inner forestay) and a storm trysail. The boat had sailed down from <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com
Seattle </st1:City>
after a Biron Toss rigging makeover so we knew that the rig design was sound. We did have Hansen rigging recheck everything as well as do a tune and Kame from Pineapple Sails inspected our sail inventory (one main, four spinnakers, four headsails and two storm sails.)<O:p
 
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