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Closet Powerboater
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Details of the events surrounding these pictures are intentionally vague (for now) but it appears there may be good news on the horizon and soon I may be less vague about what's going on. Oh, and why I'm calling it the WTF challenge should be fairly self explanatory when you see the photos below....

SO! How would YOU go about removing these gnadgered-up studs? What they appear to be (or were) is 316 stainless machine screws with a phillips head. I can access the back side of some, perhaps all of them, and they appear to be threaded into stainless sleeves which are epoxied into the solid fiberglass deck. Oh, how I wish this was addressed correctly in the beginning before the bolts were all gnadgered up, but it wasn't, so this is what I have.

I haven't really tried to remove them yet. All I've tried so far is applying Kroll penetrating oil once, and I put a vice grip on them and was unable to get them to budge. The yard says they tried to budge them (not so sure about how hard they tried) and say they can not be easily removed.

A prize will go to the person who has the idea/technique that will successfully remove these bolts!





MedSailor
 

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Med,

My symphaties!

You should use a knocking machine :) Not sure what the name is in english, but a machine that knocks at the same time as it turns the screw.
Such are sometimes used when chaning tyres, something I do twice a year.

Prior to attacing you should apply copious amounts of oil or whatever. It always helps, at least somewhat.
If you can, try to apply some heat (you can) and some cold (ice, frozen Nitrogen) in order to get the metall to expand and contract. This should be repeated many times. And oil, did I say that?

With this, I succeeded to remove stainless screws in Alu, that had been out-door for 25 years.

Worth a try.


Best of luck

J
 

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with the exception of one(the upper left one in most of the pics) those are all pretty easy

the one that is broken might not have enough strength to vise grip it

my advice is to heat cool treat them

heat them up then mix up a half and half solution of atf and acetone

when the bolt is heated it will wick into the threads let sit...tap tap to jarr them a but

then use the vise grips and they will pop out easily

cheers
 
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Med,

My symphaties!

You should use a knocking machine :) Not sure what the name is in english, but a machine that knocks at the same time as it turns the screw.
Such are sometimes used when chaning tyres, something I do twice a year.

Prior to attacing you should apply copious amounts of oil or whatever. It always helps, at least somewhat.
If you can, try to apply some heat (you can) and some cold (ice, frozen Nitrogen) in order to get the metall to expand and contract. This should be repeated many times. And oil, did I say that?

With this, I succeeded to remove stainless screws in Alu, that had been out-door for 25 years.

Worth a try.

Best of luck

J
they call those tools iimpact driver down here
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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You should use a knocking machine :) Not sure what the name is in english, but a machine that knocks at the same time as it turns the screw.
Such are sometimes used when chaning tyres, something I do twice a year.
It's called an Impact Driver, and I agree.

Personally, I have used this with great success;


Step 1 - heat the screw with a butane torch;


Step 2 - spray with penetrating oil

Step 3 - key the remnants of the stud into the chuck of the above reversible drill/driver, and set to hammer drill, very high (but not infinite) torque. Switch drill/driver to reverse, and pull the trigger.
 

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Closet Powerboater
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Am impact driver used in the first place sure would have helped avoid this situation. <sigh>

Any thoughts on how to apply said impact driver to the gnadgered studs? Only one of them has anything left of a slot on the head.

MedSailor
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Am impact driver used in the first place sure would have helped avoid this situation. <sigh>

Any thoughts on how to apply said impact driver to the gnadgered studs? Only one of them has anything left of a slot on the head.

MedSailor
The ones that you have drilled pilot holes into may be a problem. However, you MAY be able to key them directly into the chuck of the above pictured drill/driver.

If you cannot use the drill, then vice grips and a hammer are your friends. Heat and oil as above, then crank the vicegrips down tight, and have a friend give the stud a stout whack, as you try to back the stud out with the vicegrips.
 
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They look pretty messed up, but I thought I'd throw another idea at you. It might be too late for this if you've already gone the "vice-grip smash" route.

Penetrating oil for a day or two (PBblaster or SeaFoam... not Liquid Doesn'tWrench).

If you can renew the threads with a die and if there's room enough to get two nuts on, tighten the two nuts together firmly, then use the appropriate size wrench on the bottom nut to get leverage on the stuff. If necessary, use heat at that point, too. That's how I get out stubbornly rusted exhaust manifold studs in my cars. Your threads may be too far gone, but I can't tell for certain from the pics.

Best of luck... this stuff isn't fun, and I'm sorry you're faced with this dilemma.

Barry
 

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Am impact driver used in the first place sure would have helped avoid this situation. <sigh>

Any thoughts on how to apply said impact driver to the gnadgered studs? Only one of them has anything left of a slot on the head.

MedSailor
in my opinion I dont think you have enough stud for the use(correctly of the impact driver) by placing it in the chuck, some very sharp vise grips after doing the heat treatment works better in this particular case

if you care to use the method I described
 

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Any thoughts on how to apply said impact driver to the gnadgered studs? Only one of them has anything left of a slot on the head.

MedSailor
Fairly easy, but not a high probability of success:

Use a dremel and cut a new slot

More difficult, but more likelihood of success:

Grind a flat surface to the top of the stud, then weld on a bolt head to the top of the stud.
 

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Heat will expand the metal, not what you want.

Freeze it instead so it contracts, then penetrating oil; cut a X slot with a dremel or a hack saw and back them right out.
 

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well the issue you have some techniques that counter others

heat is in fact what you want if what you want is to wick in PENETRATING oil or the 50 50 mix I mentioned

heat also will crack and or melt any sort of epoxy or sealant or varnish or liquid that has migrated in the threads or not

heat and therefore the later CONTRACTION of the metal is what in reality releases the threads

if you do this more than a few times the heat thaw heat thaw is usually enough with combination of penetrating oil and some sharp vise grips to remove

last bit of advice

for those saying to cut a slot...if you do so on the stub only and especially on the ones that already had a drill hole in them you are setting yourself for the easiest crack ever

that part of stainless is extremely soft...plus you have already on most of those stubs bent and or expanded or softened the metal

the grip method compress the shaft as a whole and has a much much likelier chance of not snapping on you than the other methods provided you have used the heat method, wicking in the penetrant and most importantly

USE A COOL HEAD AND PATIENCE

peace

ps. med if you havent rebuilt any old engines before youll see that this is a walk in the park...jajajaja
 
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Fairly easy, but not a high probability of success:

Use a dremel and cut a new slot

More difficult, but more likelihood of success:

Grind a flat surface to the top of the stud, then weld on a bolt head to the top of the stud.
last ditch(cause you need a welder) but 100 percent success rate...:D

a nice hex NUT(that goes over the stud) is the tried and true method
 
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Mermaid Hunter
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Good luck.

Heating up the remnants and letting them cool will help break the connection which is likely corrosion welded.

Someone (Popular Mechanics magazine perhaps?) did a comparison of penetrating oils. As I recall PB Blaster was the best commercial product but the 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone Christian suggested was better yet.

Hitting the stud with a hammer also helps to break the corrosion bond. Since you said you have access to the bottom you might try also beating the screws from that side with a hammer and a brass drift.

After all that ViseGrips (tm) might get them out. If not you choose between welding on a bolt head (as suggested above) or EZ-Outs (which aren't easy).
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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Maybe it's me but the pictures look like they're hollow. I'm sure they're not though.

My idea is to cut the bolts flush to the surface, as close as you can get then find a hole saw and cut it out off-center from those bolts so you won't be drilling the studs themselves. Then, the same size hole saw to make a plug to fill the hole (mostly) then use fiberglass and epoxy to fill/fair it and then you can retap and place new studs, if you still need them.
 
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