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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I forgot what size boat you got was it a 22? When we had a 21 foot trailer sailer, we could not go out on 15 to 20 days either. We had limited sail options and the boat was just too tender. It could almost blow along with no sails, like a leaf. It was not fun at all and almost ruined my wife for sailing.
25ft, the Data sheet says it a comparatively more stable than others its size... but I am not very expierenced
 

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Go out and sail on days when you feel ready to do it. You've nothing to prove by attempting 20 knot gusts. Docking in those conditions can be difficult and extremely difficult if you are alone. I just watched a boat neighbor taking her boat out a few hours ago, with a guest, and a little kid! She could tell by the look on my face I was not impressed with this decision. It sounds like you you have a healthy respect for what you are undertaking, which is good. You'll get there! We've had a few scares in our previous boat, where we tried to get out of tiny little dockages down in Annapolis where I guess they figure everyone has a bow-thruster and can turn on a dime. Thankfully, because my awesome better half takes care of steering when it comes to docking, I am free to push, fend, deploy fenders, and so on as needed.
 

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Yesterday, I remarked to my wife how I really miss living aboard when the wind's up. I miss the boat moving on the anchor or mooring, and even in the slip. I miss the connection to the outdoors that you just don't get in a dirt dwelling.
I know, some of us are just nuts.....
 

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I've got a double spreader rig with lots of shrouds lined up like guitar strings and the boat faces into the wind at the slip. I warned a neighbor who lived abroad that when the wind hits 25 kts it starts to "moan" like a freakin' haunted house. He shrugged it off until one really windy night when he said it scared his dog.
 

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I've got a double spreader rig with lots of shrouds lined up like guitar strings and the boat faces into the wind at the slip. I warned a neighbor who lived abroad that when the wind hits 25 kts it starts to "moan" like a freakin' haunted house. He shrugged it off until one really windy night when he said it scared his dog.
We're a double spreader rig, too. But when the wind gets up in a slip or on the hard, she sings like a banshee! Fortunately, the former owner had a RFIM slot cover, so I can stop it if I wish.
 

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If you get back to your marina and the conditions make you doubt that you can get into your slip safely, you don't have to even try. You can simply anchor outside somewhere and wait for the wind to abate. When a common summer storm passes over, you might only have to wait an hour. It's better than damaging your boat, or your neighbor's.

Sail within your own limitations. Don't forget that, with a sailboat you have lots of options. If you feel uncomfortable sailing, take the sails down and motor, or anchor. If you get caught in a severe storm on the Chesapeake, for example, get into the lee of land anywhere and anchor, If the wind is out of the west, anyplace near the western shore will provide some shelter from the wind and much smaller waves, especially if the shore has high bluffs or tall trees. If you have adequate ground tackle, it'll hold the boat. If your ground tackle is doubtful, upgrade it. It might be your last resort to get you out of a bad situation.
 

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If you get back to your marina and the conditions make you doubt that you can get into your slip safely, you don't have to even try. You can simply anchor outside somewhere and wait for the wind to abate. When a common summer storm passes over, you might only have to wait an hour. It's better than damaging your boat, or your neighbor's.

Sail within your own limitations. Don't forget that, with a sailboat you have lots of options. If you feel uncomfortable sailing, take the sails down and motor, or anchor. If you get caught in a severe storm on the Chesapeake, for example, get into the lee of land anywhere and anchor, If the wind is out of the west, anyplace near the western shore will provide some shelter from the wind and much smaller waves, especially if the shore has high bluffs or tall trees. If you have adequate ground tackle, it'll hold the boat. If your ground tackle is doubtful, upgrade it. It might be your last resort to get you out of a bad situation.
As it implies in my signature below, and IMO, a boat's ground tackle is the most important ancillary equipment on a boat. Even more so than an engine. It is also the best insurance policy one can have.
However, anchor tackle is not a bunch of individual parts, but a matched set designed to work together with no weak links. A 125# anchor is not a match with 3/8" chain and shackles. A 35# anchor does match with 1/2" chain. A 1" nylon snub line will not have enough stretch to work well on a 35 footer, but should be perfect for a vessel using a 70 to 90# anchor and 1/2" BBB chain.
At no time will any chain we can carry be strong enough to hold your boat on it's own, on anything heavier than a day sailer, so I see little point in buying the more expensive high test chains. Once the anchor chain is pulling straight from the anchor to the bow, nothing will save you except a good snub line, or pulling it up, which may be impractical in those conditions. I always use a length of line attached where the chain normally would in the chain locker, long enough to easily reach beyond the windlass, which I can cut (buoying the end of the chain) and cast free and be gone in seconds, just for situations where being here is more dangerous than being out there, away from the bricks.
So, buy the best anchor for where you intend to anchor, match it up with the proper chain and you should sleep much better, if no idiots have anchored upwind from you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Got out this morning, was a window between 9 and 2, and apparently everyone else had the same idea... very busy, but the 15 minutes out of the two hours I was not motoring, floundering, running on a sandbar,, figuring out how I tangled my lines, or how i screwed up my headsail, somehow, those 15 minutes were perfect
139222
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
great!
what were the conditions (wind, sea state., etc) looks like 10-15 1 ft chop?
It was like 9 to 10 knts there were some gusts up to 15, and yeah about a foot of chop i guess..never got my main up, but 4kts never seemed so fast, also I docked pretty well..didn't hit a soul, even with the gusts
 

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As a suggestion,.you really don't want to put up your jib before you put up your mainsail in gusty conditions., When you only have your jib, gusts tend to make the boat turn away from the wind, making you heel over more, rather the stand up. The mainsail will make the boat want to turn towards the wind in a gust and stand up. Much safer!
 

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Got out this morning, was a window between 9 and 2, and apparently everyone else had the same idea... very busy, but the 15 minutes out of the two hours I was not motoring, floundering, running on a sandbar,, figuring out how I tangled my lines, or how i screwed up my headsail, somehow, those 15 minutes were perfect
Great! We wanted to go out, but chores needed doing. Glad you made it out there, each time should get a little easier for you.

Also, I second what Jeff H said, mailsail first, reefed too if you're seeing puffs that make you uncomfortable. Then the jib, reef that too if you need to. Your comfort levels will increase along with your experience with the lines and so on.
 

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I assume you just unfurled the jib because it was the easiest thing to do solo. How are you getting the main up and down by yourself without an autopilot? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I assume you just unfurled the jib because it was the easiest thing to do solo. How are you getting the main up and down by yourself without an autopilot? Just curious.
I was not solo, my wife was there,the main line ended up tangled and we could not get it up and she was scared to take the helm so I could get up and untangle it, So it is very simuliar to being solo as she thought I was worrying to much and "lecturing her" when I try to explain what we need to do and going out with a plan on raising etc. , the good part is now she does not think I worry too much, and has agreed to take a class

Also I do have an autopilot- but i don't trust I know enough to use it yet
 

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Key, I took my wife and friend out on sunday. both complete newbs. I was the worker bee, and I was able to coach them on how to keep the boat headed into the wind while I raised and lowered the main, and anchor. I let them sail and while we zigged and zagged across the bay, for many its not intuitive how the boat reacts. they are use to cars which reacty pretty quickly, but a sailboat. tends to take longer, and then the overcorrection begins,

I felt my self getting frustrated and started barking a bit. But it takes baby steps. She'll slowly get acclimated to manning the helm while you go forward to raise the main. key is do as much work as you can before you leave the slips. pull the cover off, attache the halyard to the main, and then bungie the halwyard to the mast so it not whipping around. if you can reduce the number of sail ties. or make them easier to remove. so youre out of the cockpit for less time.

let her sail the boat as much as possible to get comfortable and learn how quickly the boat responds to inputs.

key here is don't yell and always be supportive. if you can, wait until th end of the day to have a "post action report" with some cheese and wine and discuss how things went.. figure out where she comfortable and not...and work to alleviate the discomfort.

Other wise you'll be spending nights on the boat alone while she home... :)
 

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One has to be motivated to learn.... If they are not they will never really "get it". My wife is not interested in anything mechanical.... driving and sailing included. The boat is a place for her to relax and enjoy a new environment... but the work aspect does not thrill her. She was never motivated to drive... takes public transport or I drive her. She is not motivated to drive or to sail. Part of that is fear of an accident or situation she could not control.
 
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