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dadio917
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - We've downsizing from our wonderful valiant 39 (just up on yachtworld) and thinking about another lake boat for Tahoe where we live. I started a thread on trailorables which has focused on small mono hulls but in the process started looking at small multi hulls like Dragonfly 25, F22, Corsair 760. I don't know anything about multihulls so though I'd start this thread.

Our goal is to keep the boat partially rigged on trailor and drop it in the water at the ramp just down our street (two power lines to go under, maybe 1/8 mile) ideally for day sails but also for cruising the lake from 3-5 days. We're accomplished sailors but not racers so safety, comfort (sleeping, small galley and somewhat private potty), ease of splashing are top priorities.

I'd be interested in plusses and minuses compared to monos and mainly what models to consider.

thanks!
 

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Go look at all the Corsairs, farriers, and Dragonfly. They are indeed a blast to sail. They are also so much faster than a comparable length monohull, so you can go further in a day’s time. My little 24 ft Corsair is as fast as a 40 foot monohull.

But folding trimarans have less volume inside than a comparable monohull.
They take a little more time to set up and break down compared to a similarly equipped monohull due to the folding Floats which tuck in under the main hull for trailering.
Trimarans command a premium price, used and new.

I have owned both a Potter 19 and I now own a Corsair F24. The Corsair is definitely more work to rig than the Potter. I surely wouldn’t want to raise the mast every time I wanted to go sailing.

Come on down to San Francisco Bay for a event thrown by The BayArea Multihull Association. You’ll see mostly folding Corsairs from 22 to 31 feet, and a few bigger ones.

Sfbama.org
Judy B
 

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If you do not mind a little "road trip" to PDX, a friend of mine is selling his mint condition ODay 26, on a two axle trailer, with factory diesel shaft-drive inboard. He is now refurbishing a nice 38 foot sailboat, and needs to sell the ODay.

You folks are sort of... passing each other on the sail boat size escalator, one headed up in boat size and the other down in size! :)
Click on my name to send a private inquiry, and I can give you his email addy.
Cheers!
 

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dadio917
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Discussion Starter #7
Don't see any potty or spaces for one on the smaller models (760, F22, Dragonfly 25). Am I missing something?


If you do not mind a little "road trip" to PDX, a friend of mine is selling his mint condition ODay 26, on a two axle trailer, with factory diesel shaft-drive inboard. He is now refurbishing a nice 38 foot sailboat, and needs to sell the ODay.
Thanks....but....boat before last was an O'day 25. Had it on the sound, pdx and Tahoe. Great boat but hard to rig and heavy. So been there done that on the O'Day.
 

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For context, that "expensive" dragonfly 25 will hit speeds that an X-Yachts XP-44 can only hit when surfing down the face of a wave. XP-44 is over $300k new. So, if you value thrills above accommodation, you're not going to do better than a tri. You probably wouldn't even consider a Valiant 40.
 

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is there some justification for the prices besides thrill? Lots of carbon?
Not really. They have two models of the D25 one is a cruising model the other is race oriented, maybe that is the $130k model and the basic cruiser is $78k. I usually don't price new boats. I am sure anything with that new boat smell would give me sticker shock.
 

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For context, that "expensive" dragonfly 25 will hit speeds that an X-Yachts XP-44 can only hit when surfing down the face of a wave. XP-44 is over $300k new. So, if you value thrills above accommodation, you're not going to do better than a tri. You probably wouldn't even consider a Valiant 40.
But if you want comfort the extra couple of 100k is money well spent. I think this is an apple to oranges comparison.
 

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All the Farriers and Corsairs have room for a Portapotty. Small ones have a curtain for privacy if you want.

Yes, They are expensive, but They sail amazingly well in light, medium, and heavy winds. Would you like to do 5 kts in 5 knots of wind, on both a reach and on a run? How about 12 kts of boat speed in 12 kts of wind ? Effortlessly, without drama, and without heeling. every puff turns into instant acceleration, without heeling.

Walking around the Corsairs and Farriers is very easy, especially compared to a small trailerable under 25 feet, especially since they don’t heel past 10-15 degrees. They are huge on the outside, cockpit and tramps, so you can take guests sailing and it feels like a big boat.

You should sail one to experience the difference.

Come on down if you’d like a ride. I’d be Happy to take you out for a day sail.
 

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Life long multihull sailor here. You can read about this in my blog (in signature).

I recently downsized from a cruising cat to an F-24. I was done with cruising and always enjoyed nimble boats. A few thoughts.

* Size depends on what you really want to do. The bigger the boat, the more hastle it is to rig each time if trailered. I really would not go much bigger than 24 feet. if trailering. Not worth the work.
* Porta-potty. In fact, we use WAG bags and have not used one in several years, since we day sail. That said, there is room to fit a holding tank and some have.
* Expensive, but they hold value and are EASY to sell. I've owned 4 multis and have sold each for what I paid. All I lost was up keep and the time value of money.

You'll be hard pressed to find another sort of boat that combines the seaworthyness, speed, quick handling, and cabin in a trailerable package. 9-10 knots is so common you'll just consider it "nice," while to other 24-footers poke along at 5-6 knots. Mid-teens is easy. Above that, yeah, you need to bring your A game. And yet it points and tacks like a mono, thanks to a deep centerboard (board down it draws considerably more than my 34' cat did!).

It is going to be a lot different from a 39' mono. The motion is quick. The cabin is just a place to sit and keep some things. It's about the sailing, not about cruising. But short trips would be fine and Tahoe is not big.
 

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how do these things do in 25knt winds and 4-5 ft chop? Just reef and take it easy?
They do fine just fine in those conditions. I sail on San Francisco Bay, in the slot, in my Corsair F24 MK1. That means there frequently is 25-30 kts TWS, and tall square chop. All the Corsairs and Farrier trimarans on SF Bay sail in those condiditons on a regular basis.

You will want to wear foulies in those conditions, because you will get wet going upwind against 25 kts of true wind and 5 foot chop!

I use a reefed mainsail and a smaller jib during our season. I'd recommend a small jib for high winds. Otherwise, you'll be reefing the class jib (actually a small genoa) down to 2/3 the size all the time. That's tough on the sail and less than ideal shape. When the true wind speed is under 10 kts, use the class Screecher.

Judy B
Sailing windy San Francisco Bay
 

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A friend of mine built and sails a Farrier 22.
I wish I had one .As has already been stated - a joy to sail and fine for weekend trips.
He is 70 + years young, often sails single handed and is always first across the line.
I would buy one in a heartbeat !
 

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Once upon a time I thought about building a Strike 18 using Nacra 5.2 hulls..... but I have a tendency to take on too many projects and this project would have required completing 3 projects that I still haven't completed before I could have started the build.
 

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dadio917
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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all your comments. I'm definitely interested and will be shopping, hopefully having one by next (late) spring. My next question is one brand/model "better" than another. Again, our use would be at Tahoe and we'd want some creature comforts for camping. My wife would really like a potty with some privacy. Past trailor-sailors we've had we've kept in our side yard with frame tarps for snow protection. The sweep back floats on the Dragonfly might be more conducive for that versus the corsair that sticks up in the air. But i can also truck to a less snowy storage. We're not racers so don't need (or want) a big rig. They all look well built but maybe a difference? And then there is price. So any comments would be appreciated.
 

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Thanks for all your comments. I'm definitely interested and will be shopping, hopefully having one by next (late) spring. My next question is one brand/model "better" than another. Again, our use would be at Tahoe and we'd want some creature comforts for camping. My wife would really like a potty with some privacy. Past trailor-sailors we've had we've kept in our side yard with frame tarps for snow protection. The sweep back floats on the Dragonfly might be more conducive for that versus the corsair that sticks up in the air. But i can also truck to a less snowy storage. We're not racers so don't need (or want) a big rig. They all look well built but maybe a difference? And then there is price. So any comments would be appreciated.
Do you want new or used? There are many, many more used Corsairs available than Dragonflies.
 
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