SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The HR28 has a pretty compact/small cockpit. It seems I am always fighting my way over or around the binnacle/steering wheel. Position of guages would indicate the boat originally equipped with a tiller. At some later point the wheeled steering showed up. I would have to install gear/throttle mechanisms but the old holes are still there.

If I were to do this where would I fineda gear/throttle mechanism that would look right on a 1966 hull?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
325 Posts
My Watkins 29 wheel takes up the intire cockpit. I find myself walking on the seat cushions to get around it. The wheel is nice but I kinda miss being able to just fold the tiller up out of the way and have the cockpit open.
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
Well, it might be easier to do the wheel to tiller conversion than the initial tiller to wheel.
If you have a backup tiller steering arrangement already set up you could fairly simply disengage the wire rope to your binnacle and steer by tiller instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
I have a 1968 HR28; hull 64. It has an outboard in the well and Mercury remote throttle / shift / ignition unit mounted on the starboard foot well wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
My last boat had a wheel, I can still feel the bruises on my calf's from the lock hasps on the cockpit lockers walking around that wheel. I just bought a sailboat with a tiller. I can't wait to try it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Smaller wheel is the best solution I have read of as a solution. They both work, some like
one some another. As a technician, if it is possible it can be done, how much do you want to spend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I too like the wheel once I am at the helm but any movement around the boat quickly encounters the wheel as obstruction. Removal would be pretty straight forward. The rudder head comes through the cockpit floor and is all ready for a tiller. So unfortunately binnacle, remove cable to quadrant and out she comes. Plug holes and fit the gear/throttle mechanism and it would be done deal. Feels like no more than a one day job.

Resistance to the idea comes in terms of the cost for shifter and loss of binnacle as good steadying handhold in middle of cockpit. But I am taking make I only grab it because it is always IN THE WAY!!.
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
The only thing I like about my wheel is that it gives the whole rest of the cockpit to guests/crew when under way and stops them getting in the way of sailing stuff. Other than that, I'd take a tiller any day.
 

·
Super Fuzzy Moderator
Joined
·
17,137 Posts
My first two keel boats had tillers, the second being a 28'er similar to yours. I would not go wheel on a boat of that size, indeed I'm not at all sure that our old 34'er was better served by a wheel that she would have been by a tiller. I guess the deciding factor for me would be can I stand up under the boom when sailing close hauled ? If not, then give me a tiller.
 

·
Chastened
Joined
·
4,861 Posts
I've said this before, and I'll say it again:

Boats of a certain size and design, are far better served by a tiller and tiller pilot, not a wheel.

All these "Master & Commander" types, who think they need a G- D- wheel, so that they can look "yachty" while driving their modest, little boat, should have a wheel strapped to their back, and thrown overboard to try and swim with it. Sort of a nautical crucifixion.

Bob Perry told me a story where a guy sailed with him and said that he loved the boat, but it simply must have a wheel because he "couldn't be seen holding that tacky thing". Grrrrrr....:mad:
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
If my pedestal ever has any sort of mechanical issue I will definitely do away with it in favor of a tiller. The pedestal, as well as taking up too much room, just seems an overly complicated piece of machinery and too prone to breaking at the worst possible moment. For one thing, even the heavy duty Teleflex control cables, are IMO just not durable enough. A solid rod shift control would be much more dependable. I have had to replace two broken shift cables which is a royal PITA. It's especially annoying when they break while maneuvering into a dock! I don't trust that some part in the complex cabling/chain/sheave/quadrant system will not malfunction some day. If I had a rudder post and deck fitting, it would be high on the priority list to yank the whole thing out. If anyone out there has these parts for an old Alberg, please let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
My B32 came with a tiller. At times it was a lot of work to handle when the wind kicked up. As far as there being more room with the tiller, I can remember that no one else was able to sit next to me on the high side and when tacking, everyone would have to move. So I see the converted to wheel gives more room in the cockpit for others. The wheel is a pain to get around, but no more than going to the bow and having to swing around the stays.

Dad converted the tiller to a Edson wheel in 1977. We kept the tiller on board for years so it could be used as a backup. Not so sure it could be used to sail with the wheel in the way. 20 years after the wheel was install, and 20 years of stubbing my toes on the shaft sticking up right where you steer, and with a rudder cutlas replacement, I cut the rudder shaft short to flush with the deck and flipped the quadrant over. It was a great move. In 27 years I have never had an issue with the wheel system.

I think it was the right move for my boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Delta has made an interesting point. In addition to the challenges of going around the wheel, when seated at the helm, I have at my feet in a very small area, the rudder post and base as well as the fitting for auto helm belt tensioner. Both stick up at least 3" above cockpit floor. In addition the starting key and guages are down between my legs which is where one would expect to find them on a tiller setup. As an alternative to yanking the wheel I was considering installing a grate on the floor to give a smooth flat stepping surface... Something quick release to let me get at rudder head in case of steering failure. In fact I may try this to see if it sufficiently cares for my discomfort to tolerate the wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
It is your boat so do what suits you best...

My wheel is back in the cockpit so it is out of the way normally but I can see your point if it is smack dab in the middle.

Personally...I like my wheel;)
 

·
Advanced beginner
Joined
·
599 Posts
When I was boat shopping, I really wanted a tiller. But when I found my boat she had a wheel and I'm slowly adjusting.

I'm surprised you want to get rid of the wheel because it's in the way. To me the chief advantage of the wheel is freeing up the cockpit for passengers and not making them move every time we tack or jibe.

Big advantage of tiller steering is always knowing where you have the rudder without having to look. I particularly miss it when maneuvering in close quarters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Big advantage of tiller steering is always knowing where you have the rudder without having to look. I particularly miss it when maneuvering in close quarters.
I added a rudder position sensor to my Raymarine setup and I can still see the top of the rudder shaft, I marked it so I can tell the position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
I find a tiller can bring non sailing guests into the action. Before tacking, we just tell them they're gonna get the tiller handed to them and to hold it to their waist till we tell them to center it. We're not racing and nothing bad is gonna happen.

Within a couple tacks they are steering and their enjoyment going from passenger to participant is palpable.
 

·
Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
Joined
·
3,217 Posts
Something I find interesting. Aside from Catboats.. you never see "reverse wheels" where it at the back of the cockpit facing forward. You could either sit on the mechanism or sit or stand in front of it to steer.

Like on Silent Maid

 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
The Mariner 31 has a reverse wheel like that, with a worm gear of some sort between the wheel and rudder.



I don't think it's a setup that I'd be excited about, but it does open up the cockpit.
 

·
Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
Joined
·
3,217 Posts
it's an interesting setup.. and with it's geared setup, much more reliable than worrying about cables and pulleys. I can see why not too many people would like it though.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top