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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier this year we took on the delivery of a 1948 wooden fishing vessel from Menorca to Brighton.

As I am sure you can imagine, yacht deliveries can often be challenging. This particular delivery was certainly exceptional!

Please watch the video to see the full extent of the difficulties encountered along the way:


Editing this one was almost as emotional as it must have been for the guys and girls on board!

I hope you enjoy it...

Pete
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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5,238 Posts
Nice video Pete.
Wow, lots of stops for repairs on that delivery.
So, re-caulking the bottom in Portugal with some welding and a stop for an engine fire near the Solent? Also, hand pumping the bilge? Doesn't that old boat have an electric bilge pump?
I like old boats but they often come with myriad problems.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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7,667 Posts
Nice editing.... I can fully understand your gratitude to be home! That was a long slog..
 

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Banned
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Earlier this year we took on the delivery of a 1948 wooden fishing vessel from Menorca to Brighton.

As I am sure you can imagine, yacht deliveries can often be challenging. This particular delivery was certainly exceptional!

Please watch the video to see the full extent of the difficulties encountered along the way:

Editing this one was almost as emotional as it must have been for the guys and girls on board!

I hope you enjoy it...

Pete
Enjoy it, I did, GREAT video. Brought back some memories of old wooden boats we had:

The Flirt:

http://www.mastermariners.org/PDF's/Mar 2003.pdf Page 8

My Dad & his partner, Mike Klak, sold it in 1945, when I was 10 years old. I remember many a day on San Francisco Bay in it.

The Two Brothers, shown below. Built in 1949 at Nunes Brothers shipyard in Sausalito, California, a commercial salmon/albacore/crab boat. Had a Detroit 3-71 diesel & Twin Disc transmission, both out of a surplus Navy Landing craft, according to papers on board. Navigation equipment consisted of two compasses & one radio direction finder. However, it had a killer 150 watt single sideband radio that you could talk to God on.

There are still many older wooden boats actively commercial fishing on the Pacific coast. Thanks again for your video.

Paul T
 

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