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Chastened
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I have not yet attended the ABYC electrical certification class, I am only able to access snippets of the ABYC standards via web searches. I haven't been able to view them in their entirety.

This is sort of directed at Maine Sail, but anyone with knowledge can chime in.

- What is the allowable bend radius for different types of electrical wire?
- What are some of the acceptable and popular styles of cable restraints when attaching wire runs to bulkheads or flat surfaces?
- Are there marinized versions of back-boxes for 110v duplex receptacles? I've seen them for Blue Sea Systems breaker panels, but not for outlets.
- Can anyone share some photos of good examples of 110v AC 15 amp cable runs with multiple cables and 12v DC wire runs terminating at terminal strips?
- What is the standard for drip-loops?

This is to help me tidy up my own electrical system.
 

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Chastened
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Grrr...

My Google-Fu is weak, but apparently I finally hit upon the proper search criteria and was able to download a .pdf of the entire 182 page E-11 ABYC standard. Typically, you have to pay for copies of these standards, so I'm reluctant to just post the link here for legal reasons.

Regarding back-boxes for receptacles- Apparently all they have to do, is comply with existing UL standards (514A and 514C for non-metallic boxes). There appears to be no such thing as a "marinized" back-box to protect the back of a receptacle from water.

I do have 514C compliant back-boxes on my outlets, and the wires are installed in such a manner as to allow water to drip off, rather than run into the conductors.

A quick search failed to key in on terms like "drip loop" or "bend radius" but I may not be searching properly.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Whatever you do create a wiring diagram so that the poor SOB that follows you will be able to figure out what you did.
 
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Learning the HARD way...
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You were not excluded from the population of potential poor SOBs.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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Ah, good point. A wiring diagram will help ME, whenever I add or repair a circuit months or years down the road.
One thing I learned from someone recently is to put large, white shrink wrap around each wire near the panel and before you heat it, write in Sharpie what the wire is connected to. The shrink wrap won't degrade or fall off like tape.
 

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Making a wiring diagram is helpful, but marking the wires several times mid length will really help when you are trying to trace a fault and looking for the proper wire in a bundle that will wind it's way through every nook and cranny in your boat
 
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Wire labeling is critical, IMO. One thing I will give Jeanneau credit for is outstanding wire coding. When you remove any electrical component, the wires on the back have little clips with a code. Back at the bus panel, that code corresponds to a location. It's made a huge difference in debugging and upgrading.
 

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On your wiring diagram, be sure to note any blocks or splicing. When routing antenna wire, I always ran it as far from any other wires but if I had to choose, ran closer to my AC bundles. At sea we do use some AC, but rarely. One thing you, or anyone who has to work on the wiring might appreciate; trim the wire ties flush. Don't leave a nice sharp corner for the next hand that passes by! The shrink wrap suggestion is a good one. They also make clear shrink wrap. I use it over labels. When you bundle, make sure the wires are parallel and not twisting around each other and pull longest runs first. Top ones turn off first. This makes adding or removing a wire much easier. I did wiring on wind turbines for a bit, miles of wire in there!
 

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Chastened
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great point about labeling.

The boat's 12vdc system is in pretty good shape, and with the exception of a few additions, is as the factory installed it.
A Pearson 30 DC wiring diagram is still accurate and useful. All I need to do, is add the additional circuits to it.

Someone mounted an ancient, 20 amp 110v outlet in the galley, and used that as the shore power inlet! No fuses, no breaker panel. Nothing!

I removed that a couple of years ago, and installed a Blue Sea Systems AC panel, with 30 amp mains breaker and reverse polarity indicator. There are 3 110v outlets on the boat. They are each on their own breaker, so each outlet is a GFI. There is a Guest onboard smart battery charger.

2 outlets are pretty short runs to the breaker panel.
1 outlet is pretty far forward, on a 20 foot run, so I increased the gauge.

The run from the breaker panel to the 30 amp inlet is less than 10 feet, so no additional fusing is required. The run is restrained every 18 inches by Ancor wire restraints.

The battery charger is also very close to the breaker panel, and so the cable run is very short. It's also very close to the batteries, so the DC output cables are short.

The AC cable runs have been kept separate from any DC cable runs.

I used the proper type and gauge of wire. I installed back boxes over all of my outlets. The way everything is run, it all splits off to their destinations pretty quickly, making bundling kind of impractical.

I was concerned about sharp bends, so I kept enough slack in my runs to make gentle bends around everything, but this seems to make everything look untidy. This is where experience comes in. I'm sure someone could tell me a better way to group or restrain these cables.

Regarding zip-ties: I have a special zip-tie gun that automatically trims the excess flush with the buckle, eliminating those knuckle-scrapers.
 

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If you can spare the time to sort through it and have the interest this Cable Porn; The Art of Tidy Data Centers while mostly low voltage oriented has massive info and links to more info for all sorts of cable routing for a huge number of different cabling situations, there are about 44,000 subscibers/posters on this subject. This http://www.reddit.com/r/cableporn/search?q=drip+loop&restrict_sr=on is the rather dis-appointing "drip loop" results of a basic search there but there is lots of other info.
 
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