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I have a 29 footer and would like some advice on whether to tie up to the slip tightly or loosely to minimize the constant rocking. I expected rocking, of course: I may be new to sailboats, but I was on a Naval vessel long enough to know about rocking. I'm just looking for any little trick -- if their is such a thing -- to minimize it.

Mother Nature always wins.

TonyInNewportOregon
 

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You leave enough slack to ride up and down on the tide - failing to do so can put severe stress on the cleats by literally hanging the boat from the cleat at low tide, or sinking the boat down into the water (and over the scupper holes) at high tide. The boat must be allowed to float with the tide.

One never ties a boat to dock so hard and so tight as to prevent the boat from rocking. You either get used to it or move off. That rocking is the boat dissipating the energy of the water /waves rather than absorbing that energy.
 

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If you're at a floating dock you can tie as tightly as you wish. Some additional ballast might steady her. I once hung a bucket off the boom, below the surface, swung out to limit rolling. It helped some. That was at anchor.
 

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If your boat rocking is too much, go for a higher displacement boat next time. Depending on your location, the displacement needed to prevent an unacceptable amount of rocking will increase to the point where you will find yourself in a special kind of boat equipped with a foundation, and a mailbox. Occasionally even these "BOATS" will rock. Sorry Tony, perhaps you need to get into outer space.
 

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In a week or 2 you wont even realize it. Trust me.
I find keeping your swing line on the tight side helps. Then you only sway side to side instead of all directions.
 

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Wind and pie move my boat.
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I must be an idiot . I love the gentle rocking at the dock . I did have one person get sea sick right at the dock though . It was too funny . I guess I won't see her again . hahahhahahha
 

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Make sure you use something with stretch like three-strand nylon docklines. Sometimes people mistakenly use old dacron sheets, etc... and get jerked about. If your rock is due to waves produced from a long fetch with wind, you may want to have two dock lines at each quarter. One to be left at a looser point and one for a marked tighter point to windward as needed. This photo shows the fetch to the SSE at my current slip, so I must be prepared.

However, If your rocking is wake related I realize you need to be ready for an event at any time. A good set of fenders and fender boards can allow you to position yourself more firmly in the slip too. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
 

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I was thinking something similar. Has anyone tried these?
First; I guessing there been enough said for the question. :eek:

I did want to say I was looking at those rocker stoppers on the inet yesterday and thinking they be cheap enough to try, but, the rocking not bother me.

My boat is not in the slip now. I doing some work and move it down by the parking lot for a few days ......... OK maybe a few weeks! :p Not have to carry stuff more than 100 feet.

This place only have a walk forward and starboard and open to the shore on the port side. :rolleyes:

I can only tie up on my starboard side. I put out some rubber bumpers. Back off the bow from the dock. A line from bow to dock. Line from stern to dock. Then my spring lines. All loose on Starboard side only.

The wind usually keep me off the dock. Bumpers help when wind not agree. spring lines keep from hitting forward dock. Then I "Rock"! :laugher
 

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I like to keep mine snug so she rides in the center of the slip and rides up and down with the tides. Floating docks are easy just snug her up.

Since you have a 29 footer I'm guessing you don't have a midship cleat (my 30 doesn't). I added one that mounts onto the t-track and it allows me to rig a spring line that helps a LOT with the motion at the dock. I also tie her a bit tighter toward the bay, which is usually where the wind is coming from.

As someone else said, check out other boats in your marina, check at high and low tides, check during storms and keep adjusting until you find what is just right for your boat/slip.

Jim McGee
94 C22 Island Time
95 C30 Goin' Coastal
Maple Shade, NJ
 
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