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I am considering a sailboat re-powered with a Timray 58 HP engine. I can't for the life of me find anyone who has parts for these. Does anyone know anything about them?
 

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Heed the red flag.
Timray is a German company who uses Perkin's engines blocks.
Timray will purchase short blocks from Perkin's and then use grey market components, ie; alternators, water pumps, fuel pumps and who knows what else, to complete the engine and make it run.
You will have a difficult time finding parts for these engines as the components can be very different from similar engine to similar engine.
Timray, bless their hearts, are building Perkin's engines by sourcing parts from wherever they can find the cheapest parts and are passing those savings onto you.
I say good freaking luck trying to find a part for these grey market engines.
 

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why oh why would you volunteer to do this...

consider instead a boat with a mainstream engine..

any perceived savings on this boat, will quickly evaporate in searching for or fabricating a needed part.
 

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Just make sure you don't get too close to Volvo.
They will supply you with parts for a while, then savage you for the cost of them when you need them later.
Been there, done that, won't volunteer for that again.
 

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Parts are available on the Timray website: Timray Scheepsdiesel motoren - scheepsdiesels - scheepsmotoren - scheepsmotor

They are also available through Joe's Boat Worx out of Curacao: https://sites.google.com/site/joesboatworx/
Mr Joe's Boat Worx installed 2 Timray TMD#@di engines in our boat, both packed in due to an marinisation construction error, with proof of 4 survey reports from different surveyors he refuses guarantee and excuses me a professional marine engineer of mis handling those engines. When these engines where opened the surveyors found loads of problems questioning if they would ever have made 200 hours, so be careful. An other boat had the same problems but due to be informed by me they could save the engine from a total disaster. :devil
L.J.Criens.
 

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Be careful when renewing your engine, you pay peanuts you get peanuts even with the most beautiful sale stories.
Early 2014 we purchased through a Timray dealer installer 2 TMD32 di engines and where informed these where Perkins blocks which they are not , they are Quanchai.
During their running in period both engines packed in after running 11/2 hours variable rpm's with only 28 hours on the clock.
As the installer asked Timray to replace the engines under guarantee Timray refused, due to this I contacted a reputed engine surveyor who concluded that both engines had the same marinisation construction error .
As they looked for any possible cause of failure they disassembled one engine completely and the other partly , only to discover these engine would probably never made the 200 hours due to bad construction and declared economical total loss.
By checking Chinees made engines this appeared to be a general problem when built without European supervision.
When it comes to guarantee take into account that they refuses despite your prove, I had proof of 4 independent surveyors.
With all proof I have from a Big firm surveyor in Curacao in Holland and a Dutch surveyor who worked for a big international company in China, Joe's Boat Worx and Timray excuses me now of Slander however slander is telling untruth to damage some one, as such Timray tried to scare me although all proof of being right is on my side and as I am a professional yacht marine surveyor they slander me.
l.J.Criens.
 

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I feel compelled to offer a contrary view about Timray engines. I had one installed in 2013 and have covered many miles since then. Not a sign of a problem.

As for spare parts, consider what spare parts marine engines need until they reach high engines hours. Stock standard filters, belts and so forth which can be purchased globally. In many years when you need work done on valves and other major components, you can order them from Timray.

I think this is all a storm in a teacup. Timray offers a sound engine at an economical price. I would make the same decision in a heartbeat.
 

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they state on their website that they are Chinese made copies. So just make sure you understand what you are signing up for. For all I know, they could be stout little machines.
 

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My advice to you is the same I would give to any DIY capable person out there, and I will do this very thing if I ever need to repower.

Get a kubota engine.

Find the right size, used, and buy it. Rebuild the fuel system.
Use a dry exhaust, and a keel cooler. You now have the most reliable, maintenance free, marine diesel in the world.

You have eliminated the biggest problems with marine engines, that is cooling and exhaust. The exhaust will need a ceramic coating, inside and out, and then wrapped with thick heat proof insulation.

The keel cooler will keep the cooling water flow issues away. It will also remove a thruhull from the equation.

Using this combo, with a keel cooler for the air conditioning, you could have 0 thru hulls on the boat, and have nothing to worry about beyond the packing gland.
 

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My advice to you is the same I would give to any DIY capable person out there, and I will do this very thing if I ever need to repower.

Get a kubota engine.

Find the right size, used, and buy it. Rebuild the fuel system.
Use a dry exhaust, and a keel cooler. You now have the most reliable, maintenance free, marine diesel in the world.

You have eliminated the biggest problems with marine engines, that is cooling and exhaust. The exhaust will need a ceramic coating, inside and out, and then wrapped with thick heat proof insulation.

The keel cooler will keep the cooling water flow issues away. It will also remove a thruhull from the equation.

Using this combo, with a keel cooler for the air conditioning, you could have 0 thru hulls on the boat, and have nothing to worry about beyond the packing gland.
That sounds fantastic.

Not sure lead is much of a heat conductor. And I doubt hull coatings help much either. You are talking about an internal loop, right?
 

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Keel coolers on sailboats probably deserves its own thread.
 
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:winkI also feel compelled to offer a contrary view about Timray engines because it is always easy for people to shout out your woes but you never hear about the good things. I have one installed in 2010 with many hours used now. Not a sign of a problem.
The parts for maintenance I buy local. Engine base is industrial so parts are also easy to find worldwide.
I know know 3 other owners of a TMD engine, and all have the same experience as I do.
BR
Andy
 

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Keel coolers are exterior below water loops of pipe with cooling fins, a little like a car radiator. Actually has nothing to do with the keel. A lot of commercial boats use them, the advantages are there is no raw water loop and the coolant pump on the engine is the only pump needed. There still are two hull penetrations where the coolant lines exit and re enter the hull, but on a metal boat those are welded fittings. We find that when working on the boats during winter haul out we can run the engines on the hard if the weather is cold enough. They're not commonly found in sailboats because they do add drag.
 
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