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Discussion Starter #1
I am installing a windlass and other major electrical renovation on my CS 36T. I have come across Tinned Marine Wire as a potential cable supplier. Their prices seem very good, particularly with shippping north of the 49th.

Has anyone used their wire?

Thanks
 

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I haven't used their wire but it looks fine. Genuinedealz.com has very good prices as well and ships to Canada. They also do excellent crimps for $1.00 each which is hard to beat unless you have a good crimper. Make sure you use a heavy enough cable. Many windlass manufacturers recommend too small a cable for good performance - Lewmar being one. Here's a good link for the calcs. Just fill in the blanks a to get the answer. Best to go with 3% or less voltage drop. AWG by wire length/amps calculator

Also check out this site - Maine sail also has a CS36T
Compass Marine Project Articles Photo Gallery by Compass Marine at pbase.com
 

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I would call them to ascertain the brand of wire. Of the four big ones I prefer them in the order below (not including cost here, just workability and construction quality). I really dislike Cobra wire. It is stiff and becomes very difficult to work with in cold temps. The Berkshire is flexible and easy to work even in sub freezing temps. The Cobra jacketing also seems to get brittle quickly? Top quality builders like Morris Yachts & Lyman Morse use Berkshire.

Battery World in Portland, ME will ship it but you need to buy 100 ft min spools.

Genuine Dealz is very good and sells Pacer.

Sailors Solutions sells Berkshire too..

My preference order

Berkshire Wire
Ancor
Pacer
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Cobra
 

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I'd second using Berkshire wire, though I buy from a different source than Maine Sail. The stuff is very flexible, and very high quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am planning to go with AWG 2 for the windlass based on a reportedly fine (by some)10% voltage drop. I may install a battery in the bow as well but am undecided. I am thinking the windlass will run at about 85 amps under normal load?

130 amp, 50’. @ 10%
10.75x130x50/1.2=58229 AWG2
CM=K x l x L / E

CM = Circular Mil area of Conductors
K = 10.75 (Constant representing the mil-foot resistance of copper)
I = Current - amps
L = Length - feet
E = Voltage drop at load (in volts)
 

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I'd go heavier and aim for 3% drop. Better performance as well as longer life for the windlass motor. That translates to 4/0. The area of 4/0 is over 3 times the area of awg 2. I'd at least go to 2/0.
I'd skip putting a battery forward as this would complicate your charging and better in my opinion to put the money into larger wire than charging devices. Besides a battery under the V-berth isn't a great idea I don't think.

Maine sail - opinion please.
 

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For a windlass, you really don't want a 10% voltage drop. It would probably make far more sense to install a battery forward and use a duocharge unit to keep it charged or to go with much heavier wire to provide a 3% voltage drop at a maximum. Providing low voltage to a windlass motor will shorten its lifespan.

BTW, from the lewmar windlass instructions:

Check the voltage across the motor leads with the windlass on. (Proper voltage is 13.5 V. Constant low voltage will destroy the motor)

I am planning to go with AWG 2 for the windlass based on a reportedly fine (by some)10% voltage drop. I may install a battery in the bow as well but am undecided. I am thinking the windlass will run at about 85 amps under normal load?

130 amp, 50’. @ 10%
10.75x130x50/1.2=58229 AWG2
CM=K x l x L / E

CM = Circular Mil area of Conductors
K = 10.75 (Constant representing the mil-foot resistance of copper)
I = Current - amps
L = Length - feet
E = Voltage drop at load (in volts)
 

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I disagree. In addition to the battery placement forward you won't save on cable. If you use an ACR the forward and main batteries will be paralled during charging therefore requiring a large cable as well. The Duo charge maxes out at 30 amps so you will still need 2 awg wire to maintain a 3% drop if you use one of these. If you were to use an Echocharge it would charge the forward battery with a maximum of 15 amps of current so the cable can be 6 awg for 3% drop. But by the time you buy the ACR, Duocharge, or Echocharge and glass in a tray for the battery with hold down straps as you should you might as well buy the heavier cable. It's easier and all you have to buy is the cable and a fuse to install in the line near the battery. And no battery to maintain and fit forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
All the responses are greatly appreciated. It is an interesting topic and one with what seems no clear answer. Antaries tech support the mfg of the windlass recommend 2 awg with or without quote: "you can choose to wire a 50 feet (go and back) line from the house bank or install a new battery bank, with a 35mm2 (AWG2) you won’t have problems of voltage lowering in both systems." then there is this link, How to add a remote battery bank on a boat. who responding with this
"With this setup you are virtually just running the windlass from the local battery and the current from the charging source is essentially only used for recharging the battery. With the length of 10 gauge wire at say 60 feet the resistance is 0.06 ohms. If the windlass battery is down to 12 volts under 250 amp load and the starting battery is at 13.6, then the maximum current you can draw is 1.36/0.06 = 25 amps.
The 25 amps will help a little while winching but this is typically much smaller than the heavy current a winch can draw.

So long as the winch battery is oversized somewhat to have enough capacity for any job, this will work better than running a 2/0 cable 60 feet because all the energy at the battery is getting to the winch.

The resistance of a 2/0 cable would be .005 ohms so a winch drawing 250 amps would lose 1.2 volts. Under load in the same conditions as above would only get 12 - 1.2 = 10.8 volts to the winch."

Does anyone have the a windlass installation, if so what set uo do you have for wiring and what kind of amp draw?? The Antaries manual claims 130 amp "current absorbtion"
 

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As I said in my previous post the cable you use to go forward is dependant on the type of charging device you are using. And on the type of batteries you have. An ACR will parallel the main bank and the forward battery so requires a heavy gauge cable. With flooded batteries the acceptance is about 25% so a 100 AH battery forward would only accept 25 amps. If you were to use an AGM battery forward, which can make sense as it would be maintenance free, the inrush current is very large. With a 100 AH AGM battery forward it will accept very large inrush current. Upto 5 x capacity. No doubt your house bank is fairly large. Because of this if using an ACR, when it closes to parallel the batteries your house bank would dump anywhere up to 500 amps through the wire forward. 10 awg wouldn't cut it for long. So for most cases the wire forward has to be of a large gauge. About the only way to effectively use a small wire forward is with a Duocharge (30 amps) or Echocharge (15 amps) to charge the forward battery. Of course you then have to purchase and install either of these adding to the expense. And regardless of what the winch manufacturer says any motor has a shorter life with a lower voltage than it is designed for. And the quote in your previous post doesn't take into account newer (AGM) battery technology with their huge inrush currents. When they suggested 10 awg for the wire to the forward battery they were not considering AGM batteries. Also your example of 10.8 volts getting to the winch is incorrect. The 12 volts you state as a starting voltage is a battery bank that is less than 50% SOC. The starting voltage for a fully charged bank is about 12.9 volts or close to it and if running the engine as most would when running a windlass the voltage would be even higher. The simplest most maintenance free way to install a windlass is to bite the bullet and use a heavy gauge wire to go forward. For a 3% drop at 50' return distance and 130 amps draw that would be 4/0 cable. No battery to install, no additional charging device to buy, no extra maintenance and long life for the windlass.
 
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